How can liberals of such high stature stoop to such catty high school girl insults?

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) has been a real fighter in the charade of an impeachment hearing going on in the House.  He shredded the anti-Trump lib law profs who came before the hearing, getting all three to admit donating to Democrat candidates, and one to writing snarky columns about the president.  When Pamela Karlan tried to interrupt, he cut her off at the knees: "Excuse me, you don't get to interrupt me during this time" (the limited time he was allowed to question witnesses).

Gaetz may be the next Trump.  He fights back against liberal condescension and snottiness.  He rebuked Karlan, noting that her remarks about the president's son Barron just come across as mean.  To me, the telling thing about those remarks was their juvenility; they're the sort of thing I heard regularly from the teenagers I once taught in high school.

Karlan can't seem to help herself, though, and seems to think it's all a game of who can say the cattiest thing.  "Liberals tend to cluster more.  Conservatives, especially very conservative people, tend to spread out more, perhaps because they don't even want to be around themselves."

Or perhaps because liberals cluster like scared little girls seeking safety in numbers, while conservatives move boldly ahead on their own.  Trepidation herds the fearful together; courage moves the confident alone down roads less traveled.

Karlan has company in the endless liberal snarkfest against ordinary Joes.  AT's M. Catharine Evans recounts that Molly Jong-Fast, daughter of feminist misanthropist Erica Jong, had just taken possession of a $5-million apartment overlooking Central Park and was asked if she would be "a neighborhood shopper."

Jong-Fast replied, "I'm just not like that.  I mean, I'm happy for those people.  Quite frankly, they have to exist.  It's important for the ecosystem; it's like plankton."

Got that?  You are plankton.  Guess that makes Adam Schiff planktonite.

Yeah, our side can do snark, too.

Image: stanfordlawschool via YouTube.

Rep. Matt Gaetz (R-Fla.) has been a real fighter in the charade of an impeachment hearing going on in the House.  He shredded the anti-Trump lib law profs who came before the hearing, getting all three to admit donating to Democrat candidates, and one to writing snarky columns about the president.  When Pamela Karlan tried to interrupt, he cut her off at the knees: "Excuse me, you don't get to interrupt me during this time" (the limited time he was allowed to question witnesses).

Gaetz may be the next Trump.  He fights back against liberal condescension and snottiness.  He rebuked Karlan, noting that her remarks about the president's son Barron just come across as mean.  To me, the telling thing about those remarks was their juvenility; they're the sort of thing I heard regularly from the teenagers I once taught in high school.

Karlan can't seem to help herself, though, and seems to think it's all a game of who can say the cattiest thing.  "Liberals tend to cluster more.  Conservatives, especially very conservative people, tend to spread out more, perhaps because they don't even want to be around themselves."

Or perhaps because liberals cluster like scared little girls seeking safety in numbers, while conservatives move boldly ahead on their own.  Trepidation herds the fearful together; courage moves the confident alone down roads less traveled.

Karlan has company in the endless liberal snarkfest against ordinary Joes.  AT's M. Catharine Evans recounts that Molly Jong-Fast, daughter of feminist misanthropist Erica Jong, had just taken possession of a $5-million apartment overlooking Central Park and was asked if she would be "a neighborhood shopper."

Jong-Fast replied, "I'm just not like that.  I mean, I'm happy for those people.  Quite frankly, they have to exist.  It's important for the ecosystem; it's like plankton."

Got that?  You are plankton.  Guess that makes Adam Schiff planktonite.

Yeah, our side can do snark, too.

Image: stanfordlawschool via YouTube.