We're all supposed to shed tears over Marie Yovanovitch and mean old Trump

Mark Twain once said, "When red-headed people are above a certain social grade their hair is auburn."  The author of "Huck Finn" was right.  While there is nothing wrong with having money or status, a lot of people who're in that position believe themselves to be superior and act condescendingly to others.  What Walter Cronkite said rings true: "It's a little hard not to be an elitist when you're making millions of dollars a year."

Arrogant condescension was rampant on day two of the impeachment hearings. Former  U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch was the star witness.  Though she couldn't identify a time when President Trump took a bribe or broke a law, she testified for hours about how awful it was that she was recalled from Ukraine.  She was "shocked and devastated" by the news that Trump had disparaged her in a phone call with Ukraine's president.

 A fact that has gone underreported is that President Zelensky didn't respect Ambassador Yovanovitch.  He said,  "Her attitude towards me was far from the best as she admired the previous president and she was on his side." 

Was it, then, appropriate for President Trump to reassign her?  Of course.  No one disputes that ambassadors serve at the will of the president.  So if she has no knowledge of wrongdoing on the part of the president and wasn't unjustly fired, why was she there?

She was there to create drama and elicit sympathy.  She was there to make Trump look mean, harsh, and anti-woman.  At the hearing, she described her reaction to being mentioned by both presidents, saying, "A person who saw me reading the transcript said that the color drained from my face.  I think I even had a physical reaction.  Even now words kind of fail me."

The complicit media obliged and began to make the case of how noble she is and wronged she'd been.  CNN's Richard Sokolsky bemoaned how wrongly she'd been treated, calling it a "travesty."

Former Meet the Press host David Gregory, now a CNN contributor, opined, "I'm genuinely shocked by his behavior with regard to this foreign service officer of three decades.  To disparage her and to demean her in sexist overtones saying, 'the woman over there.' To threaten her, to say to a foreign leader that she's bad news?"

Fox News joined in.  During the testimony of former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, Fox News anchor Chris Wallace said, "I think that if you are not moved, and we'll see what happens in the cross-examination, but if you are not moved by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don't have a pulse."

Here we have elites bemoaning an elite who was recalled from being an ambassador and had to continue to work at the State Department and teach at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

What they don't get is that real people have faced and some still face real issues.  No one bemoaned their plight.  There were no stinging editorials written for them.  These were the forgotten people.  These were the ones who found President Trump a champion.

While the impeachment circus still plays in the capital, real people are working to feed families, save money, send kids to college, and sometimes manage two jobs.  Congress could help by passing some of the Trump administration's policies, like USMCA, but instead, these people waste time and money appeasing a hate-filled, angry leftist base.  Elites caring for elites — not a surprise.

Mark Twain once said, "When red-headed people are above a certain social grade their hair is auburn."  The author of "Huck Finn" was right.  While there is nothing wrong with having money or status, a lot of people who're in that position believe themselves to be superior and act condescendingly to others.  What Walter Cronkite said rings true: "It's a little hard not to be an elitist when you're making millions of dollars a year."

Arrogant condescension was rampant on day two of the impeachment hearings. Former  U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch was the star witness.  Though she couldn't identify a time when President Trump took a bribe or broke a law, she testified for hours about how awful it was that she was recalled from Ukraine.  She was "shocked and devastated" by the news that Trump had disparaged her in a phone call with Ukraine's president.

 A fact that has gone underreported is that President Zelensky didn't respect Ambassador Yovanovitch.  He said,  "Her attitude towards me was far from the best as she admired the previous president and she was on his side." 

Was it, then, appropriate for President Trump to reassign her?  Of course.  No one disputes that ambassadors serve at the will of the president.  So if she has no knowledge of wrongdoing on the part of the president and wasn't unjustly fired, why was she there?

She was there to create drama and elicit sympathy.  She was there to make Trump look mean, harsh, and anti-woman.  At the hearing, she described her reaction to being mentioned by both presidents, saying, "A person who saw me reading the transcript said that the color drained from my face.  I think I even had a physical reaction.  Even now words kind of fail me."

The complicit media obliged and began to make the case of how noble she is and wronged she'd been.  CNN's Richard Sokolsky bemoaned how wrongly she'd been treated, calling it a "travesty."

Former Meet the Press host David Gregory, now a CNN contributor, opined, "I'm genuinely shocked by his behavior with regard to this foreign service officer of three decades.  To disparage her and to demean her in sexist overtones saying, 'the woman over there.' To threaten her, to say to a foreign leader that she's bad news?"

Fox News joined in.  During the testimony of former U.S. ambassador to Ukraine Marie Yovanovitch, Fox News anchor Chris Wallace said, "I think that if you are not moved, and we'll see what happens in the cross-examination, but if you are not moved by the testimony of Marie Yovanovitch today, you don't have a pulse."

Here we have elites bemoaning an elite who was recalled from being an ambassador and had to continue to work at the State Department and teach at Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.

What they don't get is that real people have faced and some still face real issues.  No one bemoaned their plight.  There were no stinging editorials written for them.  These were the forgotten people.  These were the ones who found President Trump a champion.

While the impeachment circus still plays in the capital, real people are working to feed families, save money, send kids to college, and sometimes manage two jobs.  Congress could help by passing some of the Trump administration's policies, like USMCA, but instead, these people waste time and money appeasing a hate-filled, angry leftist base.  Elites caring for elites — not a surprise.