Trump moves to declare Mexican cartels 'foreign terrorist organizations'

While Democrats are busy fiddling with impeachment, Mexico next door is burning, and President Trump is showing all signs of serious focus on that important threat to us.

Trump says he's going to declare Mexico's organized crime cartels "foreign terrorist organizations," and he's already well along in the process of getting that done.  Sara Carter has some good reporting on what Trump means:

In an interview with Bill O'Reilly that aired on Tuesday the President said "they will be designated … I have been working on that for the last 90 days."

"You know, designation is not that easy, you have to go through a process, and we are well into that process," said Trump.

And it comes at a good time.  Mexico is in such bad shape, what with its leftist president's hug-a-drug-dealer policy, that the country is falling apart.  There are scores of bad stories going on now, from the fall of the country's safest fortress, Guanajuato state, to the miserable situation in Sinaloa, where drug dealers actually forced Mexico's armed forces in Culiacán to retreat in battle.  There was the unprecedented attack on the American family in Mexico's north, something the surviving family members say was a targeted attack.

So yes, what's going on in Mexico has the same characteristics as the acts of ISIS, which took over parts of Iraq and Syria, unleashed a flood of refugees, killed innocent Americans quite deliberately, amassed huge amounts of money (from oil and illegal drugs), and went for a political takeover, attracting thousands of gullible losers worldwide to act as cannon fodder.

The cartels kill Americans, and not just the Mormon family in the Mexican north.  They amass money from sales — such as Mexican oil, which they have shown signs of getting the hooks in same as ISIS, but also avocados, illegal alien smuggling fees, illegal drug sales, any dirty business.  They challenge the Mexican state for power and expropriate land, same as ISIS challenged and took over territory in several weak Middle Eastern states.  They encourage and benefit from refugee floods, given the human smuggling fees they collect and the potential for sending in infiltrators among the huddled masses.  They corrupt business, and they make free trade impossible.

It actually makes a lot of sense.  And for Mexico, given Trump's recent stellar record on crushing terror, it ought to be good news, the arrival of the cavalry they could actually use.

But Mexico is complicating things, and its officials are stating that they don't want to sell out their country (President Andrés Manuel López-Obrador says he won't be a "vendepatrias"), and they don't want foreign troops on Mexican soil.

According to Agence France-Presse:

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has rejected "interventionism" after US President Donald Trump said he was working to designate the Latin American country's drug cartels as terrorist organisations.

Earlier this month Mr Trump called for a "war" on the cartels when nine women and children from a Mormon community in northern Mexico were killed in an ambush.

The victims were dual US-Mexican citizens.

"Cooperation, yes, intervention, no" Mr Lopez Obrador said in a morning news conference when asked about Mr Trump's comments.

Mr Lopez Obrador said Mexico would take up the issue after the US Thanksgiving holiday tomorrow and that he had asked his foreign minister to lead talks.

It just shows how far behind the times they are, given that the U.S.-Mexican War was in 1848, and they've got a cartel problem threatening their state now.  It's an unusually bad placement of priorities, as if AMLO thinks the problem isn't a mortal threat to the country but something they can handle with hugs if they ignore it long enough and let it become someone else's problem.  The other thing is, states face terrorists threats very commonly by stepping into other states' territory.  Colombia decimated its FARC terrorist problem through a very smart bombing on the Ecuador side of its border of a top terrorist named Raúl Reyes, who was taking safe haven in Ecuador at the time.  Colombia, for a time, put its terrorists on the defensive with that one and said oops, sorry to the leftists running Ecuador and yelling about their territory.

Still, it's optimistic to see that AMLO wants to talk about it with his ministers after Thanksgiving, hopefully to see if they can't package the idea to the public as something other than yanqui interventions.  Trump of course is reluctant to put U.S. boots on the ground in foreign countries, so the likelihood rises that he can do what needs to be done with drones, interrogating "asylum-seekers" who pay cartels to be smuggled illegally into the U.S. for intelligence, and other measures.

Rejecting the aid from the most successful terrorism-fighter except maybe the Israelis is beyond stupid.  Someone's there who wants to get rid of a bad problem that none of his predecessors were able to stop, and AMLO hesitates?

While Democrats are busy fiddling with impeachment, Mexico next door is burning, and President Trump is showing all signs of serious focus on that important threat to us.

Trump says he's going to declare Mexico's organized crime cartels "foreign terrorist organizations," and he's already well along in the process of getting that done.  Sara Carter has some good reporting on what Trump means:

In an interview with Bill O'Reilly that aired on Tuesday the President said "they will be designated … I have been working on that for the last 90 days."

"You know, designation is not that easy, you have to go through a process, and we are well into that process," said Trump.

And it comes at a good time.  Mexico is in such bad shape, what with its leftist president's hug-a-drug-dealer policy, that the country is falling apart.  There are scores of bad stories going on now, from the fall of the country's safest fortress, Guanajuato state, to the miserable situation in Sinaloa, where drug dealers actually forced Mexico's armed forces in Culiacán to retreat in battle.  There was the unprecedented attack on the American family in Mexico's north, something the surviving family members say was a targeted attack.

So yes, what's going on in Mexico has the same characteristics as the acts of ISIS, which took over parts of Iraq and Syria, unleashed a flood of refugees, killed innocent Americans quite deliberately, amassed huge amounts of money (from oil and illegal drugs), and went for a political takeover, attracting thousands of gullible losers worldwide to act as cannon fodder.

The cartels kill Americans, and not just the Mormon family in the Mexican north.  They amass money from sales — such as Mexican oil, which they have shown signs of getting the hooks in same as ISIS, but also avocados, illegal alien smuggling fees, illegal drug sales, any dirty business.  They challenge the Mexican state for power and expropriate land, same as ISIS challenged and took over territory in several weak Middle Eastern states.  They encourage and benefit from refugee floods, given the human smuggling fees they collect and the potential for sending in infiltrators among the huddled masses.  They corrupt business, and they make free trade impossible.

It actually makes a lot of sense.  And for Mexico, given Trump's recent stellar record on crushing terror, it ought to be good news, the arrival of the cavalry they could actually use.

But Mexico is complicating things, and its officials are stating that they don't want to sell out their country (President Andrés Manuel López-Obrador says he won't be a "vendepatrias"), and they don't want foreign troops on Mexican soil.

According to Agence France-Presse:

Mexican President Andres Manuel Lopez Obrador has rejected "interventionism" after US President Donald Trump said he was working to designate the Latin American country's drug cartels as terrorist organisations.

Earlier this month Mr Trump called for a "war" on the cartels when nine women and children from a Mormon community in northern Mexico were killed in an ambush.

The victims were dual US-Mexican citizens.

"Cooperation, yes, intervention, no" Mr Lopez Obrador said in a morning news conference when asked about Mr Trump's comments.

Mr Lopez Obrador said Mexico would take up the issue after the US Thanksgiving holiday tomorrow and that he had asked his foreign minister to lead talks.

It just shows how far behind the times they are, given that the U.S.-Mexican War was in 1848, and they've got a cartel problem threatening their state now.  It's an unusually bad placement of priorities, as if AMLO thinks the problem isn't a mortal threat to the country but something they can handle with hugs if they ignore it long enough and let it become someone else's problem.  The other thing is, states face terrorists threats very commonly by stepping into other states' territory.  Colombia decimated its FARC terrorist problem through a very smart bombing on the Ecuador side of its border of a top terrorist named Raúl Reyes, who was taking safe haven in Ecuador at the time.  Colombia, for a time, put its terrorists on the defensive with that one and said oops, sorry to the leftists running Ecuador and yelling about their territory.

Still, it's optimistic to see that AMLO wants to talk about it with his ministers after Thanksgiving, hopefully to see if they can't package the idea to the public as something other than yanqui interventions.  Trump of course is reluctant to put U.S. boots on the ground in foreign countries, so the likelihood rises that he can do what needs to be done with drones, interrogating "asylum-seekers" who pay cartels to be smuggled illegally into the U.S. for intelligence, and other measures.

Rejecting the aid from the most successful terrorism-fighter except maybe the Israelis is beyond stupid.  Someone's there who wants to get rid of a bad problem that none of his predecessors were able to stop, and AMLO hesitates?