The Economist, baseball, and Donald Trump

Much ado has been made about the reception President Trump received the other week at the fifth game of the World Series in National Park in Washington, D.C., but none has exaggerated as much as the Economist.

In the November 2 issue, the title of the magazine's Lexington column was "Take me out of this ball game: Donald Trump's embarrassing reception at the World Series was a defining moment of his presidency."  So, despite all the major actions Trump has taken, The Economist thinks Trump getting booed at a baseball game, a game played in the belly of the beast, no less, is "a defining moment."  As Karol Markowicz writes in the New York Post, booing presidents at sporting events is something Americans typically do.

It would have been interesting to see how Lexington would spin its "defining moment" narrative if the article was written after the president received sustained cheers from among the 100,000-plus fans at the Alabama-LSU game.  But what happened in Tuscaloosa will be flushed down the memory hole by the mainstream media.

If a column like Lexington's appeared in a high school or college newspaper, one could shrug his shoulders and smile at how juvenile it was.  But the Economist is taken as gospel by many of the world's "movers and shakers."  What makes the whole thing so humorous is that many of the world's muckety-mucks who read the Economist think they actually know America because of it.  In fact, they remain clueless.  As a result, they will always be blindsided by events in the United States.  Trump's election in 2016 is an example; they never saw him coming.

This shows the danger of having a flawed paradigm on viewing Donald Trump and even America itself.  Everything the media see is skewed to the negative.  Unfortunately for the likes of the Economist, if it doesn't adjust its paradigm to fit reality, it will be left looking foolish time and time again.  This holds for the entire mainstream media as well.

Much ado has been made about the reception President Trump received the other week at the fifth game of the World Series in National Park in Washington, D.C., but none has exaggerated as much as the Economist.

In the November 2 issue, the title of the magazine's Lexington column was "Take me out of this ball game: Donald Trump's embarrassing reception at the World Series was a defining moment of his presidency."  So, despite all the major actions Trump has taken, The Economist thinks Trump getting booed at a baseball game, a game played in the belly of the beast, no less, is "a defining moment."  As Karol Markowicz writes in the New York Post, booing presidents at sporting events is something Americans typically do.

It would have been interesting to see how Lexington would spin its "defining moment" narrative if the article was written after the president received sustained cheers from among the 100,000-plus fans at the Alabama-LSU game.  But what happened in Tuscaloosa will be flushed down the memory hole by the mainstream media.

If a column like Lexington's appeared in a high school or college newspaper, one could shrug his shoulders and smile at how juvenile it was.  But the Economist is taken as gospel by many of the world's "movers and shakers."  What makes the whole thing so humorous is that many of the world's muckety-mucks who read the Economist think they actually know America because of it.  In fact, they remain clueless.  As a result, they will always be blindsided by events in the United States.  Trump's election in 2016 is an example; they never saw him coming.

This shows the danger of having a flawed paradigm on viewing Donald Trump and even America itself.  Everything the media see is skewed to the negative.  Unfortunately for the likes of the Economist, if it doesn't adjust its paradigm to fit reality, it will be left looking foolish time and time again.  This holds for the entire mainstream media as well.