Saturday Schadenfreude: Kamala Harris's staff quits and tells media her campaign is a disaster

While the field of Democrats running for the party's presidential nomination contains some seriously scorn-worthy politicians, Kamala Harris is the worst of the lot when it comes to dishonesty, hypocrisy, and a willingness to say or do anything to advance her career.  When she launched her campaign with a rally in Oakland, I was worried about the organizational capabilities that brought a claimed 20,000 people to downtown Oakland to cheer her on toward the White House.  A woman who began her political career by sexually servicing a decades-older powerful male politician who bestowed public office on her should not get anywhere near the Oval Office as its tenant.


Photo credit: Mark Warner.

Fortunately for the Republic, it's been all downhill for her since then.  She's been called out by rivals for her hypocrisies, such as laughing about smoking pot after sending many people to prison for the same acts as a D.A.  And she has been a terrible manager of her campaign.

Now, as she languishes in the low single digits despite her twofer racial status and cis-female identity politics appeal to Democrats, and as the moneybags donors who call the shots abandon her, her staff is leaping from the sinking ship and dissing her to the media.

Politico:

Kelly Mehlenbacher, who worked on operations for Kamala Harris' presidential bid and recently informed colleagues of her plans to resign over frustrations with the organization, has accepted a job with Michael Bloomberg, sources said Wednesday.

Mehlenbacher, who served as the treasury manager for Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, will become deputy chief operating officer for Bloomberg, according to two Democratic officials familiar with the move.

Harris' campaign has experienced significant turbulence as she fell far behind in polls. That includes layoffs and redeployments to Iowa, where she's banking on a come-from-behind, top-three finish to jumpstart her spiraling chances in South Carolina.

Mehlenbacher was among a group of staffers who tendered their resignations amid the latest round of layoffs, which hit the operations team hard. The staff reductions and subsequent shifts have focused renewed attention on deep and long-standing dysfunction among the campaign's top leaders.

If Kamala can't manage a campaign staff, running the federal government is obviously beyond her capabilities.

The New York Times yesterday did almost a postmortem in the campaign, as if it has already ended, in an article titled, "How Kamala Harris's Campaign Unraveled."

In early November, a few days after Senator Kamala Harris's presidential campaign announced widespread layoffs and an intensified focus on Iowa, her senior aides gathered for a staff meeting at their Baltimore headquarters and pelted the campaign manager, Juan Rodriguez, with questions.

What exactly was Ms. Harris's new strategy? How much money and manpower could they put into Iowa? What would their presence be like in other early voting states?

Mr. Rodriguez offered general, tentative answers that didn't satisfy the room, according to two campaign officials directly familiar with the conversation. Some Harris aides sitting at the table could barely suppress their fury about what they saw as the undoing of a once-promising campaign.

Somebody gave the Times Mehlenbacher's "blistering" resignation letter.  Somebody wants to make sure that Kamala's reputation suffers as much damage as possible.  Notably, the letter is addressed not to Harris, but rather "To Whom it may concern" (see below).

Their feelings were reflected days later by Kelly Mehlenbacher, the state operations director, in a blistering resignation letter obtained by The Times.

"This is my third presidential campaign and I have never seen an organization treat its staff so poorly," Ms. Mehlenbacher wrote, assailing Mr. Rodriguez and Ms. Harris's sister, Maya, the campaign chairwoman, for laying off aides with no notice. "With less than 90 days until Iowa we still do not have a real plan to win."


Source.

Until she ran for president and put herself in a harsh spotlight, Harris had coasted along with the somnolent California media content to play P.R. agents for a female of color. Now that her shallowness and hypocrisy have been exposed, perhaps she will face an actual opponent with a chance of taking away her Senate seat in 2022.

A guy can hope...

While the field of Democrats running for the party's presidential nomination contains some seriously scorn-worthy politicians, Kamala Harris is the worst of the lot when it comes to dishonesty, hypocrisy, and a willingness to say or do anything to advance her career.  When she launched her campaign with a rally in Oakland, I was worried about the organizational capabilities that brought a claimed 20,000 people to downtown Oakland to cheer her on toward the White House.  A woman who began her political career by sexually servicing a decades-older powerful male politician who bestowed public office on her should not get anywhere near the Oval Office as its tenant.


Photo credit: Mark Warner.

Fortunately for the Republic, it's been all downhill for her since then.  She's been called out by rivals for her hypocrisies, such as laughing about smoking pot after sending many people to prison for the same acts as a D.A.  And she has been a terrible manager of her campaign.

Now, as she languishes in the low single digits despite her twofer racial status and cis-female identity politics appeal to Democrats, and as the moneybags donors who call the shots abandon her, her staff is leaping from the sinking ship and dissing her to the media.

Politico:

Kelly Mehlenbacher, who worked on operations for Kamala Harris' presidential bid and recently informed colleagues of her plans to resign over frustrations with the organization, has accepted a job with Michael Bloomberg, sources said Wednesday.

Mehlenbacher, who served as the treasury manager for Hillary Clinton's 2016 campaign, will become deputy chief operating officer for Bloomberg, according to two Democratic officials familiar with the move.

Harris' campaign has experienced significant turbulence as she fell far behind in polls. That includes layoffs and redeployments to Iowa, where she's banking on a come-from-behind, top-three finish to jumpstart her spiraling chances in South Carolina.

Mehlenbacher was among a group of staffers who tendered their resignations amid the latest round of layoffs, which hit the operations team hard. The staff reductions and subsequent shifts have focused renewed attention on deep and long-standing dysfunction among the campaign's top leaders.

If Kamala can't manage a campaign staff, running the federal government is obviously beyond her capabilities.

The New York Times yesterday did almost a postmortem in the campaign, as if it has already ended, in an article titled, "How Kamala Harris's Campaign Unraveled."

In early November, a few days after Senator Kamala Harris's presidential campaign announced widespread layoffs and an intensified focus on Iowa, her senior aides gathered for a staff meeting at their Baltimore headquarters and pelted the campaign manager, Juan Rodriguez, with questions.

What exactly was Ms. Harris's new strategy? How much money and manpower could they put into Iowa? What would their presence be like in other early voting states?

Mr. Rodriguez offered general, tentative answers that didn't satisfy the room, according to two campaign officials directly familiar with the conversation. Some Harris aides sitting at the table could barely suppress their fury about what they saw as the undoing of a once-promising campaign.

Somebody gave the Times Mehlenbacher's "blistering" resignation letter.  Somebody wants to make sure that Kamala's reputation suffers as much damage as possible.  Notably, the letter is addressed not to Harris, but rather "To Whom it may concern" (see below).

Their feelings were reflected days later by Kelly Mehlenbacher, the state operations director, in a blistering resignation letter obtained by The Times.

"This is my third presidential campaign and I have never seen an organization treat its staff so poorly," Ms. Mehlenbacher wrote, assailing Mr. Rodriguez and Ms. Harris's sister, Maya, the campaign chairwoman, for laying off aides with no notice. "With less than 90 days until Iowa we still do not have a real plan to win."


Source.

Until she ran for president and put herself in a harsh spotlight, Harris had coasted along with the somnolent California media content to play P.R. agents for a female of color. Now that her shallowness and hypocrisy have been exposed, perhaps she will face an actual opponent with a chance of taking away her Senate seat in 2022.

A guy can hope...