Mike Bloomberg spending $31.5 million in one week to show this ad nationwide

We now have a preview of the way Michael Bloomberg plans to buy the Democrats' nomination and the presidency.  A big part of his massive spending program will be focused on trashing President Donald Trump while touting himself as a self-made man.  The budget for this ad alone is at a saturation level in targeted markets.

Advertising Analytics confirmed with The Hill on Saturday that Bloomberg's multimillion-dollar ad campaign would air in 98 local markets and on some national cable channels in the most expensive ad purchase from any candidate in one week of political advertising. The former mayor's ad filmed by Kantar/CMAG is expected to run through the holiday weekend until Dec. 2.

CMAG told ABC News that the candidate is spending at least $37 million in ad buys in states such as California, New York, Florida, Texas and Illinois, including $29.3 million in local broadcasts.

Watch for yourself:

There is some danger of overkill if Bloomberg commercials become ubiquitous.  People could become angry or bored with him.

The ad tries to take credit for New York City's recovery from 9/11, when his predecessor, Mayor Giuliani, a close Trump aide, is solidly identified by the national public as the man who spurred that recovery.  There is danger for Bloomberg in that sort of claim.

The ad also features pictures of Bloomberg with most of the identity groups to which Democrats pander.


(Grabien screen grabs.)

We now have a preview of the way Michael Bloomberg plans to buy the Democrats' nomination and the presidency.  A big part of his massive spending program will be focused on trashing President Donald Trump while touting himself as a self-made man.  The budget for this ad alone is at a saturation level in targeted markets.

Advertising Analytics confirmed with The Hill on Saturday that Bloomberg's multimillion-dollar ad campaign would air in 98 local markets and on some national cable channels in the most expensive ad purchase from any candidate in one week of political advertising. The former mayor's ad filmed by Kantar/CMAG is expected to run through the holiday weekend until Dec. 2.

CMAG told ABC News that the candidate is spending at least $37 million in ad buys in states such as California, New York, Florida, Texas and Illinois, including $29.3 million in local broadcasts.

Watch for yourself:

There is some danger of overkill if Bloomberg commercials become ubiquitous.  People could become angry or bored with him.

The ad tries to take credit for New York City's recovery from 9/11, when his predecessor, Mayor Giuliani, a close Trump aide, is solidly identified by the national public as the man who spurred that recovery.  There is danger for Bloomberg in that sort of claim.

The ad also features pictures of Bloomberg with most of the identity groups to which Democrats pander.


(Grabien screen grabs.)