Buttigieg campaign has just made his problems with black support much worse

The mainstream media have done their best to paper over Pete Buttigieg's problems with attracting black support.  They hate to admit that there could ever be conflict among members of "intersectional" grievance groups.  Blacks, in particular, are to be shielded from any criticism of collective behavior, which must always be supported, or at least "understood" in "context."

But African-Americans have more negative attitudes toward homosexual behavior than other major demographic segments of the population, based at least in part on attendance at churches that have played a major role in the civil rights revolutions of the past 60 years, and are therefore somewhat sanctified and immune from criticism.  So we see almost nothing in the media addressing black opposition to Buttigieg based on his sexual practices.


Photo credit: Gage Skidmore.

The Buttigieg campaign, which is all about appearing warm, fuzzy, and safe, is not about denounce "homophobia" among blacks.  Instead, it tried to use endorsements from leading black figures in South Carolina for Buttigieg's "Douglass Plan," a scheme to address problems facing blacks.  Unfortunately, the campaign used a trick that has blown up in its face and is alienating blacks in South Carolina and elsewhere.  Ryan Grim of The Intercept checked out the endorsements and found out that the endorsees claimed they had not heard of their endorsements.  Chrissy Clark explains at The Federalist:

On October 24, Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg released an op-ed claiming more than 400 South Carolinians have endorsed his "Douglass Plan for Black America." It turns out that the three black politicians listed at the top of his press release never endorsed the plan and 40 percent of the endorsement names listed are of white people.

According to The Intercept, Buttigieg sent out a press release with the op-ed, citing three prominent South Carolinians including: Columbia City Councilwoman Tameika Devine, Baptist pastor and state Rep. Ivory Thigpen, and Johnnie Cordero, chair of the South Carolina Black Caucus. (snip)

But The Intercept found none of these politicians endorsed Buttigieg or his plan, which includes financial reparations for slavery more than a century after the fact and decriminalizing drugs.

Devine told The Intercept she has yet to endorse a presidential candidate and did not intend her support of Buttigieg's plan to be read as an endorsement for his candidacy at large. (snip)

Thigpen says he told the Buttigieg campaign he was a strong Bernie Sanders supporter and was not interested in endorsing Buttigieg or the Douglass plan.

Johnnie Cordero, the third politician listed in the press release, is no longer listed as a supporter. Cordero told The Intercept he never endorsed the plan or Buttigieg.

The campaign used a highly questionable "opt-out" formula to garner the "endorsements":

Writing in Slate, Ben Mathis-Lilley comments:

The ethics of such a Big Tech–style opt-out approach aside, Cordero and Thigpen's quotes indicate that the Buttigieg campaign and its "endorsers" may not have agreed on whether they were in fact "endorsers" at all.

And while you'll note that the Buttigieg release above merely implies that the people endorsing the plan are black, a sharp-eyed Twitter user noticed that the email the campaign sent about the article to its signees claims that the 400 supporters involved are "black South Carolinians." When the Intercept matched the names of the alleged supporters with publicly available information about South Carolina voters, though, it found that at least 184 of them are white.

And on top of all this, the campaign used a stock photo from Kenya to promote its Douglass Plan:

None of these moves connotes respects for American blacks.  It all carries a whiff of condescension.

Iowans may be flocking to Buttigieg right now, but we'll see how his campaign does in South Carolina.  No Democrat can win the presidency without enthusiastic black support.

The mainstream media have done their best to paper over Pete Buttigieg's problems with attracting black support.  They hate to admit that there could ever be conflict among members of "intersectional" grievance groups.  Blacks, in particular, are to be shielded from any criticism of collective behavior, which must always be supported, or at least "understood" in "context."

But African-Americans have more negative attitudes toward homosexual behavior than other major demographic segments of the population, based at least in part on attendance at churches that have played a major role in the civil rights revolutions of the past 60 years, and are therefore somewhat sanctified and immune from criticism.  So we see almost nothing in the media addressing black opposition to Buttigieg based on his sexual practices.


Photo credit: Gage Skidmore.

The Buttigieg campaign, which is all about appearing warm, fuzzy, and safe, is not about denounce "homophobia" among blacks.  Instead, it tried to use endorsements from leading black figures in South Carolina for Buttigieg's "Douglass Plan," a scheme to address problems facing blacks.  Unfortunately, the campaign used a trick that has blown up in its face and is alienating blacks in South Carolina and elsewhere.  Ryan Grim of The Intercept checked out the endorsements and found out that the endorsees claimed they had not heard of their endorsements.  Chrissy Clark explains at The Federalist:

On October 24, Democratic presidential hopeful Pete Buttigieg released an op-ed claiming more than 400 South Carolinians have endorsed his "Douglass Plan for Black America." It turns out that the three black politicians listed at the top of his press release never endorsed the plan and 40 percent of the endorsement names listed are of white people.

According to The Intercept, Buttigieg sent out a press release with the op-ed, citing three prominent South Carolinians including: Columbia City Councilwoman Tameika Devine, Baptist pastor and state Rep. Ivory Thigpen, and Johnnie Cordero, chair of the South Carolina Black Caucus. (snip)

But The Intercept found none of these politicians endorsed Buttigieg or his plan, which includes financial reparations for slavery more than a century after the fact and decriminalizing drugs.

Devine told The Intercept she has yet to endorse a presidential candidate and did not intend her support of Buttigieg's plan to be read as an endorsement for his candidacy at large. (snip)

Thigpen says he told the Buttigieg campaign he was a strong Bernie Sanders supporter and was not interested in endorsing Buttigieg or the Douglass plan.

Johnnie Cordero, the third politician listed in the press release, is no longer listed as a supporter. Cordero told The Intercept he never endorsed the plan or Buttigieg.

The campaign used a highly questionable "opt-out" formula to garner the "endorsements":

Writing in Slate, Ben Mathis-Lilley comments:

The ethics of such a Big Tech–style opt-out approach aside, Cordero and Thigpen's quotes indicate that the Buttigieg campaign and its "endorsers" may not have agreed on whether they were in fact "endorsers" at all.

And while you'll note that the Buttigieg release above merely implies that the people endorsing the plan are black, a sharp-eyed Twitter user noticed that the email the campaign sent about the article to its signees claims that the 400 supporters involved are "black South Carolinians." When the Intercept matched the names of the alleged supporters with publicly available information about South Carolina voters, though, it found that at least 184 of them are white.

And on top of all this, the campaign used a stock photo from Kenya to promote its Douglass Plan:

None of these moves connotes respects for American blacks.  It all carries a whiff of condescension.

Iowans may be flocking to Buttigieg right now, but we'll see how his campaign does in South Carolina.  No Democrat can win the presidency without enthusiastic black support.