'Extinction Rebellion' protesters choose hilariously apt mode of protest on Australian beach

Members of apocalyptic cults always are certain in the superiority of their wisdom over that of ordinary people who cannot grasp that the end is near!  Their frustration over the failure of others to share their sense of doom often leads them to engage in acts that strike nonbelievers as comical.  The lone fanatic walking the streets with a sign or sandwich board proclaiming "the end is near" has been a staple of mockery for generations.

But when you combine pseudo-science with the human impulse to believe that doom for all attends behavior that one objects to in the age of memes, sometimes the doomsters accidentally mock themselves.  Such was the case a few days ago in Australia, when about 150 doomsday cultists titling themselves the "Extinction Rebellion" staged a demonstration at Sydney's Manly Beach.  Believing themselves to be mocking those who refuse to accept their conviction that the computer models predicting escalating temperatures tied to a rise in the atmospheric trace gas CO2 are infallible, a group of protesters buried their heads in the sand.


YouTube screen grabs (cropped).

Of course, this is the very cause that demands that skeptics be declared "deniers" and refuses to follow the scientific method, which holds all knowledge subject to challenge by data, with the nonsensical claim that science is determined by "consensus."  Burying one's head in the sand by refusing to hear contradictory data.

Writing in The Australian Daily Telegraph (paywalled), Alan Jones noticed their unintentional hilarity:

There were 150 of them, singing and chanting about the death of mother Earth. What an appropriate metaphor, heads buried in the sand.

Of equivalent significance was a comment by one: "A lot of our group have become middle-class white people who are quite privileged. To be honest, activism is a privilege."

Jones goes on the catalogue just a few of the doomsday predictions purportedly based on science that have produced the doom  so feverishly anticipated:

Remember in March 1998, scientists declared, if we believe in scientists, that a two-kilometre wide asteroid called 997XF11 was on a near-collision course with the Earth. [emphasis in original]

That's what the scientists told us.

We later found that the asteroid missed the Earth by at least a million kilometres.

Remember Halley's comet. The scientists told us it was going to clean us out. In the end you needed high-powered binoculars to even see it.

Remember during the Gulf War we were told we were going to run out of oil, so everyone raced for LPG.

Remember Y2K, the year 2000.

If you had a computer you were made to panic. The scientists told us.

So, we have "privileged" people burying their heads in the sand to demonstrate what the unprivileged refuse to see by being open to counterarguments and the scientific method. Someone has no sense of perspective...and no sense of humor, either.


(Source.)

Hat tip: John McMahon.

Members of apocalyptic cults always are certain in the superiority of their wisdom over that of ordinary people who cannot grasp that the end is near!  Their frustration over the failure of others to share their sense of doom often leads them to engage in acts that strike nonbelievers as comical.  The lone fanatic walking the streets with a sign or sandwich board proclaiming "the end is near" has been a staple of mockery for generations.

But when you combine pseudo-science with the human impulse to believe that doom for all attends behavior that one objects to in the age of memes, sometimes the doomsters accidentally mock themselves.  Such was the case a few days ago in Australia, when about 150 doomsday cultists titling themselves the "Extinction Rebellion" staged a demonstration at Sydney's Manly Beach.  Believing themselves to be mocking those who refuse to accept their conviction that the computer models predicting escalating temperatures tied to a rise in the atmospheric trace gas CO2 are infallible, a group of protesters buried their heads in the sand.


YouTube screen grabs (cropped).

Of course, this is the very cause that demands that skeptics be declared "deniers" and refuses to follow the scientific method, which holds all knowledge subject to challenge by data, with the nonsensical claim that science is determined by "consensus."  Burying one's head in the sand by refusing to hear contradictory data.

Writing in The Australian Daily Telegraph (paywalled), Alan Jones noticed their unintentional hilarity:

There were 150 of them, singing and chanting about the death of mother Earth. What an appropriate metaphor, heads buried in the sand.

Of equivalent significance was a comment by one: "A lot of our group have become middle-class white people who are quite privileged. To be honest, activism is a privilege."

Jones goes on the catalogue just a few of the doomsday predictions purportedly based on science that have produced the doom  so feverishly anticipated:

Remember in March 1998, scientists declared, if we believe in scientists, that a two-kilometre wide asteroid called 997XF11 was on a near-collision course with the Earth. [emphasis in original]

That's what the scientists told us.

We later found that the asteroid missed the Earth by at least a million kilometres.

Remember Halley's comet. The scientists told us it was going to clean us out. In the end you needed high-powered binoculars to even see it.

Remember during the Gulf War we were told we were going to run out of oil, so everyone raced for LPG.

Remember Y2K, the year 2000.

If you had a computer you were made to panic. The scientists told us.

So, we have "privileged" people burying their heads in the sand to demonstrate what the unprivileged refuse to see by being open to counterarguments and the scientific method. Someone has no sense of perspective...and no sense of humor, either.


(Source.)

Hat tip: John McMahon.