Does Trump have something up his sleeve to help Boris?

The situation looks tough for U.K. Boris Johnson, but not entirely.

It started out pretty bad Wednesday, with the U.K. parliament pulling another fast one and passing a measure to mandate another delay in Brexit beyond the hard Oct. 31 deadline. That gives Britain a choice of surrendering to EU exhorbitant demands or else just hanging on, and on, and on... Without the threat to just quit the EU and let the arrogant eurotrash pick up the pieces, now any deal agreed upon will be one that comes on Europe's terms. That's a disgusting thing for parliamentarians to stake their record on. But they did, they seem to 'like' being ruled by the EU. After that, Johnson called on Britain's far-left Labour Party to agree to a snap election to sort this impasse out, but Labour, knowing well that it would be defeated, declined, probably for about the first time in its history and Johnson called them 'cowards.' Johnson says he's going to try again Monday with them. Sadder still, Boris's beloved brother Jo Johnson just quit his position in parliament as a diehard remainer. He didn't want to be getting into family fights. Honorable enough, but why is leaving the EU so terribly hard for him?

The miserable situation has prompted the center-left Financial Times to editorialize that:

Rarely has a UK prime minister’s strategy imploded so rapidly, and so spectacularly. In two days, Boris Johnson has become the first premier since the Earl of Rosebery in 1894 to lose his first parliament vote, and seen MPs back a bill to force him to take a course he has categorically ruled out. He has collapsed his own working majority from one to minus 43 — by backing himself into a position where he was forced to sack 21 rebels, including two former Conservative chancellors and the grandson of his political hero, Winston Churchill. He has led his party to the brink of a historic split. His plan to strike back with a snap election is hostage to his opponents’ agreement. The so-called Rebel Alliance of MPs who took control of parliament’s agenda and supported a law mandating Mr Johnson to seek an extension to Brexit beyond October 31 deserve high praise. The Conservatives among them put national interest ahead of their careers and loyalty to a party some had served for decades. Most important, MPs asserted parliamentary sovereignty and cut down to size a prime minister who, by suspending the House for five weeks, had sought to bypass it. 

Yes, a harsh assessment about Britain being now cornered by the EU, but quite possibly not the end of the story...

Over at The Sun, the newspaper printed some kind of mysterious remarks from President Trump:

DONALD Trump has backed Boris Johnson to secure a general election and deliver Brexit by the end of October.

Speaking in the Oval Office, the president told reporters that the prime minister "knows how to win" and is "going to be fine".

 Now, maybe Trump doesn't know what he's talking about. But actually, maybe he does, he often does in other situations. Could the U.S. help its ally?

One almost wonders if Trump's easy optimism might be because he's got something up his sleeve. One wonders if he might be coming round the back way to help Britain get out of its EU nightmare ... maybe by squeezing the EU to play fairly? Could the U.S. squeeze the European Union with warnings about its NATO deadbeatery, unless it play fair with Britain and lets the country just leave in peace? One wonders. Why would he be so optimistic?

There's more than a hint that something is afoot with this. And on a separate front, Mehdi Hasan reports at The Intercept that Republicans and Tories are working closely. One additional thing is that Vice President Mike Pence is in London now, offering bigtime U.S. political support for Britain. According to the Washington Times:

“The United States is ready, willing and able to immediately negotiate a free-trade agreement with the U.K.,” Mr. Pence told Mr. Johnson in a sit-down at 10 Downing Street. “We’re anxious to stand with you and do everything in our power to strengthen what has been an historic and special relationship between the United States of America and the United Kingdom. And it is embodied in the very warm and personal relationship that you have forged with President Trump, with myself and with our administration.”

“Fantastic to have you here. Will will drive that free-trade agreement forward,” Mr. Johnson said, bemoaning the fact Americans don’t get enough British lamb, beef or haggis.
Suffice to say, Boris was joking about the haggis -- I think.
 
Something is going on, though. Everyone should stay tuned to see what might be what.
 
Image credit: Lunar Dragoon, via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0

The situation looks tough for U.K. Boris Johnson, but not entirely.

It started out pretty bad Wednesday, with the U.K. parliament pulling another fast one and passing a measure to mandate another delay in Brexit beyond the hard Oct. 31 deadline. That gives Britain a choice of surrendering to EU exhorbitant demands or else just hanging on, and on, and on... Without the threat to just quit the EU and let the arrogant eurotrash pick up the pieces, now any deal agreed upon will be one that comes on Europe's terms. That's a disgusting thing for parliamentarians to stake their record on. But they did, they seem to 'like' being ruled by the EU. After that, Johnson called on Britain's far-left Labour Party to agree to a snap election to sort this impasse out, but Labour, knowing well that it would be defeated, declined, probably for about the first time in its history and Johnson called them 'cowards.' Johnson says he's going to try again Monday with them. Sadder still, Boris's beloved brother Jo Johnson just quit his position in parliament as a diehard remainer. He didn't want to be getting into family fights. Honorable enough, but why is leaving the EU so terribly hard for him?

The miserable situation has prompted the center-left Financial Times to editorialize that:

Rarely has a UK prime minister’s strategy imploded so rapidly, and so spectacularly. In two days, Boris Johnson has become the first premier since the Earl of Rosebery in 1894 to lose his first parliament vote, and seen MPs back a bill to force him to take a course he has categorically ruled out. He has collapsed his own working majority from one to minus 43 — by backing himself into a position where he was forced to sack 21 rebels, including two former Conservative chancellors and the grandson of his political hero, Winston Churchill. He has led his party to the brink of a historic split. His plan to strike back with a snap election is hostage to his opponents’ agreement. The so-called Rebel Alliance of MPs who took control of parliament’s agenda and supported a law mandating Mr Johnson to seek an extension to Brexit beyond October 31 deserve high praise. The Conservatives among them put national interest ahead of their careers and loyalty to a party some had served for decades. Most important, MPs asserted parliamentary sovereignty and cut down to size a prime minister who, by suspending the House for five weeks, had sought to bypass it. 

Yes, a harsh assessment about Britain being now cornered by the EU, but quite possibly not the end of the story...

Over at The Sun, the newspaper printed some kind of mysterious remarks from President Trump:

DONALD Trump has backed Boris Johnson to secure a general election and deliver Brexit by the end of October.

Speaking in the Oval Office, the president told reporters that the prime minister "knows how to win" and is "going to be fine".

 Now, maybe Trump doesn't know what he's talking about. But actually, maybe he does, he often does in other situations. Could the U.S. help its ally?

One almost wonders if Trump's easy optimism might be because he's got something up his sleeve. One wonders if he might be coming round the back way to help Britain get out of its EU nightmare ... maybe by squeezing the EU to play fairly? Could the U.S. squeeze the European Union with warnings about its NATO deadbeatery, unless it play fair with Britain and lets the country just leave in peace? One wonders. Why would he be so optimistic?

There's more than a hint that something is afoot with this. And on a separate front, Mehdi Hasan reports at The Intercept that Republicans and Tories are working closely. One additional thing is that Vice President Mike Pence is in London now, offering bigtime U.S. political support for Britain. According to the Washington Times:

“The United States is ready, willing and able to immediately negotiate a free-trade agreement with the U.K.,” Mr. Pence told Mr. Johnson in a sit-down at 10 Downing Street. “We’re anxious to stand with you and do everything in our power to strengthen what has been an historic and special relationship between the United States of America and the United Kingdom. And it is embodied in the very warm and personal relationship that you have forged with President Trump, with myself and with our administration.”

“Fantastic to have you here. Will will drive that free-trade agreement forward,” Mr. Johnson said, bemoaning the fact Americans don’t get enough British lamb, beef or haggis.
Suffice to say, Boris was joking about the haggis -- I think.
 
Something is going on, though. Everyone should stay tuned to see what might be what.
 
Image credit: Lunar Dragoon, via Wikimedia Commons // CC BY-SA 3.0