Critics find yet another global warming fraud: walruses leaping to their death because of reduced ice

When they aren't citing the fraudulent claim that 97% of scientists back global warming alarmism, those who wish to panic us into handing over control of all energy usage to governments resort to emotional imagery of animals they claim are endangered by global warming.  The notorious picture of a polar bear on a piece of ice was used for years, until it became clear that polar bear populations are growing and that polar bears love to ride ice and then go for a swim.

Time for new creature to be used to evoke feelings of pity and guilt, those emotions that progressives continually exploit.  And into the breach came no less a revered icon than Sir David Attenborough, the veteran BBC broadcaster and BBC executive often labeled a "national treasure" in British polls and publications.  In his Netflix series Our Planet, Sir David's narration claimed that walruses have been driven to suicidal falls from rugged cliffs because there is no more ice for them.


YouTube screen grab.

Watch the trailer below, cued to the moment a narrator states, "They'd be on the ice now, if they could be..."

But before you start calling for the criminal prosecution of fossil fuel executives, as Bernie Sanders now does, consider the evidence assembled by the Global Warming Policy Forum that walruses diving from cliffs is a behavior that far predates claims of global warming, and that "national treasure" Attenborough has defrauded his viewers.

Naturalist Sir David Attenborough finds himself accused of misleading the public in his Netflix documentary Our Planet.

Aired at the start of the year, the show became notorious for heart-wrenching footage of walruses falling to their deaths from cliffs in Siberia.

Attenborough's claim that this was due to global warming became highly controversial when it was revealed that the footage had been recorded during an incident when polar bears were known to have driven walruses over the cliffs.

Now, archive video confirms that Attenborough misled his audience. US Fish and Wildlife Service footage, recorded at Cape Pierce in Alaska in 1994, shows that more than 100 walruses had fallen from cliffs there on a number of occasions. The explanation given by scientists at the time was overcrowding on the beaches.

Here is the video:

So who's the denier now?

When they aren't citing the fraudulent claim that 97% of scientists back global warming alarmism, those who wish to panic us into handing over control of all energy usage to governments resort to emotional imagery of animals they claim are endangered by global warming.  The notorious picture of a polar bear on a piece of ice was used for years, until it became clear that polar bear populations are growing and that polar bears love to ride ice and then go for a swim.

Time for new creature to be used to evoke feelings of pity and guilt, those emotions that progressives continually exploit.  And into the breach came no less a revered icon than Sir David Attenborough, the veteran BBC broadcaster and BBC executive often labeled a "national treasure" in British polls and publications.  In his Netflix series Our Planet, Sir David's narration claimed that walruses have been driven to suicidal falls from rugged cliffs because there is no more ice for them.


YouTube screen grab.

Watch the trailer below, cued to the moment a narrator states, "They'd be on the ice now, if they could be..."

But before you start calling for the criminal prosecution of fossil fuel executives, as Bernie Sanders now does, consider the evidence assembled by the Global Warming Policy Forum that walruses diving from cliffs is a behavior that far predates claims of global warming, and that "national treasure" Attenborough has defrauded his viewers.

Naturalist Sir David Attenborough finds himself accused of misleading the public in his Netflix documentary Our Planet.

Aired at the start of the year, the show became notorious for heart-wrenching footage of walruses falling to their deaths from cliffs in Siberia.

Attenborough's claim that this was due to global warming became highly controversial when it was revealed that the footage had been recorded during an incident when polar bears were known to have driven walruses over the cliffs.

Now, archive video confirms that Attenborough misled his audience. US Fish and Wildlife Service footage, recorded at Cape Pierce in Alaska in 1994, shows that more than 100 walruses had fallen from cliffs there on a number of occasions. The explanation given by scientists at the time was overcrowding on the beaches.

Here is the video:

So who's the denier now?