Chick-fil-A opens first international store as eager customers step over bodies of 'die-in' protesters

There is something magical and quietly hilarious about the ability of a fast food chain peddling chicken to arouse deep outrage from the alienated few and yet record-setting patronage by the greater public.  Chick-fil-A manages to do the seemingly impossible: it enjoys the largest per store sales of any fast food chain, despite being closed on Sundays.  And that religious observance is related to the hatred directed at it from those who resent its support for causes related to promoting biblical constraints on sexuality.

Yesterday, Chick-fil-A ventured beyond the borders of the United States for the very first time, opening the first of 15 planned stores in the Greater Toronto Area, and militant homosexuals as well as animal righties attempted to obstruct customers, some of whom started lining up as early as 6:30 A.M., from entering the store.  Fox News reported:

The grand opening of Chick-fil-A's first international location in Toronto was met by a grand protest Friday by LGBTQ activists, who argued that the chicken-centric chain owner's historically antigay policies will clash with the culture of Canada's largest city.

Protestors caused a commotion as soon as the restaurant opened its doors at 10:30 a.m., chanting "shame" and "cluck you," CBC News reports.

"Hey hey, ho ho, Homophobia's got to go," activists can be heard shouting in video shared to Twitter by BlogTo. (snip)

"We won't allow hateful rhetoric to be here," Justin Khan of local LGBTQ organization The 519 told CBC. "The fact that Chick-fil-A is opening on the streets of Toronto is something that is quite alarming."

Founded in 1967, the biblical values of Chick-fil-A's management strategy have long stirred controversy.  Company chairman and CEO Dan Cathy has voiced his opposition to same-sex marriage, but Chick-fil-A says it doesn't have a political or social agenda. The company says that in 2017, it donated $1.6 million to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, a group that is overtly against gay marriage, for sports camps for inner-city youth. It also donated $150,000 to the Salvation Army, which has also been accused of discrimination.

People observing the tenets of their religion are targeted.  How is this not religious bigotry?

The display of self-righteous anger backfired, as customers calmly stepped over and around the bodies attempting to block access and entered to enjoy delicious chicken sandwiches and nuggets.


Twitter video screen grabs.

I recall that something similar happened when the company opened its first store in Manhattan; Mayor deBlasio fumed, protestors gathered, but so did crowds of customers, and after the protestors went away, the crowds continued to mob the store.

Back in May of 2016, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called for a boycott against the popular restaurant chain Chick-fil-A because he didn't like it that Dan Cathy, the chain's owner, would talk about his family's Christian beliefs, including traditional marriage.

This, despite the fact that the company doesn't discriminate against anyone, and has proven to be an asset to every community in which they have a location. (snip)

Chick-fil-A now [October 2018] operates four locations in New York City. When the first restaurant opened, it was reported New Yorkers stood in lines around the corner to get a taste of their signature chicken sandwich.

The chain just opened their largest restaurant in the country in Lower Manhattan's financial district. The new facility has five levels, innovative ordering technology, seating for 140 guests and an open-air rooftop dining experience, according to the company's website

Luke Cook, the local franchise owner, said he plans to employ 150 people. 

Perhaps frustrated by their ineffectiveness, protesters escalated:

A Manhattan Chick-fil-A was vandalized during Sunday's [June 23, 2019] Pride parade, according to photos provided to the Daily Caller.

The photos, taken of the Chick-fil-A location on 46th Street in Manhattan, show the words "F**k haters" scrawled across the windows and an "X" in red duct tape bearing the same words. There was also a small sign reading "LOVE is a terrible thing to waste" propped against the door.

The craziness of damaging property and spewing obscenity to "defend love" is obvious to most people.  At this point, the haters of Chick-fil-A are driving more customers to the object of their hate.  They can't get beyond their own woundedness to see how repulsive they are.  They certainly have driven me to patronize the company — at first out of curiosity over all the fuss, and then because the food and service are both outstanding.

There is something magical and quietly hilarious about the ability of a fast food chain peddling chicken to arouse deep outrage from the alienated few and yet record-setting patronage by the greater public.  Chick-fil-A manages to do the seemingly impossible: it enjoys the largest per store sales of any fast food chain, despite being closed on Sundays.  And that religious observance is related to the hatred directed at it from those who resent its support for causes related to promoting biblical constraints on sexuality.

Yesterday, Chick-fil-A ventured beyond the borders of the United States for the very first time, opening the first of 15 planned stores in the Greater Toronto Area, and militant homosexuals as well as animal righties attempted to obstruct customers, some of whom started lining up as early as 6:30 A.M., from entering the store.  Fox News reported:

The grand opening of Chick-fil-A's first international location in Toronto was met by a grand protest Friday by LGBTQ activists, who argued that the chicken-centric chain owner's historically antigay policies will clash with the culture of Canada's largest city.

Protestors caused a commotion as soon as the restaurant opened its doors at 10:30 a.m., chanting "shame" and "cluck you," CBC News reports.

"Hey hey, ho ho, Homophobia's got to go," activists can be heard shouting in video shared to Twitter by BlogTo. (snip)

"We won't allow hateful rhetoric to be here," Justin Khan of local LGBTQ organization The 519 told CBC. "The fact that Chick-fil-A is opening on the streets of Toronto is something that is quite alarming."

Founded in 1967, the biblical values of Chick-fil-A's management strategy have long stirred controversy.  Company chairman and CEO Dan Cathy has voiced his opposition to same-sex marriage, but Chick-fil-A says it doesn't have a political or social agenda. The company says that in 2017, it donated $1.6 million to the Fellowship of Christian Athletes, a group that is overtly against gay marriage, for sports camps for inner-city youth. It also donated $150,000 to the Salvation Army, which has also been accused of discrimination.

People observing the tenets of their religion are targeted.  How is this not religious bigotry?

The display of self-righteous anger backfired, as customers calmly stepped over and around the bodies attempting to block access and entered to enjoy delicious chicken sandwiches and nuggets.


Twitter video screen grabs.

I recall that something similar happened when the company opened its first store in Manhattan; Mayor deBlasio fumed, protestors gathered, but so did crowds of customers, and after the protestors went away, the crowds continued to mob the store.

Back in May of 2016, New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio called for a boycott against the popular restaurant chain Chick-fil-A because he didn't like it that Dan Cathy, the chain's owner, would talk about his family's Christian beliefs, including traditional marriage.

This, despite the fact that the company doesn't discriminate against anyone, and has proven to be an asset to every community in which they have a location. (snip)

Chick-fil-A now [October 2018] operates four locations in New York City. When the first restaurant opened, it was reported New Yorkers stood in lines around the corner to get a taste of their signature chicken sandwich.

The chain just opened their largest restaurant in the country in Lower Manhattan's financial district. The new facility has five levels, innovative ordering technology, seating for 140 guests and an open-air rooftop dining experience, according to the company's website

Luke Cook, the local franchise owner, said he plans to employ 150 people. 

Perhaps frustrated by their ineffectiveness, protesters escalated:

A Manhattan Chick-fil-A was vandalized during Sunday's [June 23, 2019] Pride parade, according to photos provided to the Daily Caller.

The photos, taken of the Chick-fil-A location on 46th Street in Manhattan, show the words "F**k haters" scrawled across the windows and an "X" in red duct tape bearing the same words. There was also a small sign reading "LOVE is a terrible thing to waste" propped against the door.

The craziness of damaging property and spewing obscenity to "defend love" is obvious to most people.  At this point, the haters of Chick-fil-A are driving more customers to the object of their hate.  They can't get beyond their own woundedness to see how repulsive they are.  They certainly have driven me to patronize the company — at first out of curiosity over all the fuss, and then because the food and service are both outstanding.