California legislative madness

The People's Republic of California dodged a couple of bullets recently, but a third one is chambered, and Governor Newsom's finger is on the trigger.  The State Assembly voted in favor of three bills that would have moved us farther down the road to socialism or worse. 

Assembly Bill 1027 would have added a new wrinkle to the state's approach to subsidies and tax breaks to businesses.  It would have mandated that the state get an ownership position in companies that benefit from various subsidies or tax breaks. 

In order to save money and paper, A.B. 161 would prohibit paper receipts.  Everything would be electronic.  It would further the ability for data brokers to infiltrate private transactions.  Granted, that exists today when using a credit card.  This would just make it all-encompassing for those who pay for products and services by cash or check.

Fortunately, these two bills were shot down in the state Senate.  I will not be surprised if they are revisited in the next legislative session.


California State Capitol (photo credit: andre m).

However, A.B. 857 is now sitting on the governor's desk.  It calls for local governments to operate their own banks.  The argument is that federal and state charted banks have failed to properly loan money to progressive causes.  Supposedly, local dollars would stay in local communities and fund various social needs. 

There are 5,000 local units of government in California, ranging from Los Angeles to a small water district.  Just think of the opportunities for political pull, bias, and corruption.  It could be a field day for those in positions of power and influence.  We are headed down a slippery slope in California with its one-party system.

The People's Republic of California dodged a couple of bullets recently, but a third one is chambered, and Governor Newsom's finger is on the trigger.  The State Assembly voted in favor of three bills that would have moved us farther down the road to socialism or worse. 

Assembly Bill 1027 would have added a new wrinkle to the state's approach to subsidies and tax breaks to businesses.  It would have mandated that the state get an ownership position in companies that benefit from various subsidies or tax breaks. 

In order to save money and paper, A.B. 161 would prohibit paper receipts.  Everything would be electronic.  It would further the ability for data brokers to infiltrate private transactions.  Granted, that exists today when using a credit card.  This would just make it all-encompassing for those who pay for products and services by cash or check.

Fortunately, these two bills were shot down in the state Senate.  I will not be surprised if they are revisited in the next legislative session.


California State Capitol (photo credit: andre m).

However, A.B. 857 is now sitting on the governor's desk.  It calls for local governments to operate their own banks.  The argument is that federal and state charted banks have failed to properly loan money to progressive causes.  Supposedly, local dollars would stay in local communities and fund various social needs. 

There are 5,000 local units of government in California, ranging from Los Angeles to a small water district.  Just think of the opportunities for political pull, bias, and corruption.  It could be a field day for those in positions of power and influence.  We are headed down a slippery slope in California with its one-party system.