Why Pelosi is surrendering the Democratic Party to the Jew-haters

A historic transition of the American political landscape is underway, as the older of our two parties is embracing antisemitism and moving away from support of Israel, driven by the personal ambition of a craven politician clinging to power.  Nancy Pelosi's desire to remain speaker of the House is why she is surrendering the Democrats' party to the Jew-haters, with the highly visible, openly antisemitic Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib becoming the real face of her party.

No fewer than seven of Pelosi's key political allies are facing primary challenges, just as did her close, long-serving ally Joe Crowley in 2018, birthing the political career of a comely former bartender, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.  All of these senior Democrats realize that in low-turnout primaries, a highly motivated faction can deliver the nomination to a challenger.  Jennifer Shutt of Roll Call examines the challenges that are scaring Pelosi, staring with Rep. Nita Lowey:

Mondaire Jones, a former Obama administration Justice Department staffer and attorney for Westchester County's Law Department, [will] challenge Lowey in next June's primary. The 32-year-old political novice plans to take on the New York Democratic incumbent over her positions on issues ranging from climate change to student debt forgiveness to oversight of the Trump administration.

[One] hopes the same sentiment that propelled young progressives to victory in the last election cycle — with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's defeat of longtime New York Democrat Joseph Crowley the most famous example — will resonate with voters throughout New York's Rockland and Westchester counties.

"The conventional wisdom dictated that people like me — young people, people of color — had to wait their turn, that they had to accept the opportunities that were given to them instead of putting themselves out there and letting the voters decide," Jones said in an interview.

The other Pelosi lieutenants facing challengers:

Ways and Means Chairman Richard E. Neal of Massachusetts; Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot L. Engel of New York; and Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone Jr. of New Jersey, who took office in late 1988 after a special election (snip)… Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Peter A. DeFazio of Oregon, first elected in 1986; Agriculture Chairman Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota, first elected in 1990; and even Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York, the party's point man on impeachment proceedings, who came to Congress after a 1992 special election.

Pelosi could choose to stand up and fight for her party's soul.  But so far, she has not, and there is no sign of her recognizing that she is participating in a shameful surrender to bigotry.  At least she can claim she is helping her party return to its roots in support for slavery and Jim Crow.

Democrats used to pay lip service to "Profiles in Courage" — the title of a best-selling ghostwritten book about Democrats who embraced unpopular liberal positions because they thought they were morally correct, purportedly written by a young John F. Kennedy.

Those days are gone.  Jews will have to depend on the Republican Party alone, if they have the mental agility to realize that the party they have historically supported has turned on them.

A historic transition of the American political landscape is underway, as the older of our two parties is embracing antisemitism and moving away from support of Israel, driven by the personal ambition of a craven politician clinging to power.  Nancy Pelosi's desire to remain speaker of the House is why she is surrendering the Democrats' party to the Jew-haters, with the highly visible, openly antisemitic Ilhan Omar and Rashida Tlaib becoming the real face of her party.

No fewer than seven of Pelosi's key political allies are facing primary challenges, just as did her close, long-serving ally Joe Crowley in 2018, birthing the political career of a comely former bartender, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez.  All of these senior Democrats realize that in low-turnout primaries, a highly motivated faction can deliver the nomination to a challenger.  Jennifer Shutt of Roll Call examines the challenges that are scaring Pelosi, staring with Rep. Nita Lowey:

Mondaire Jones, a former Obama administration Justice Department staffer and attorney for Westchester County's Law Department, [will] challenge Lowey in next June's primary. The 32-year-old political novice plans to take on the New York Democratic incumbent over her positions on issues ranging from climate change to student debt forgiveness to oversight of the Trump administration.

[One] hopes the same sentiment that propelled young progressives to victory in the last election cycle — with Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez's defeat of longtime New York Democrat Joseph Crowley the most famous example — will resonate with voters throughout New York's Rockland and Westchester counties.

"The conventional wisdom dictated that people like me — young people, people of color — had to wait their turn, that they had to accept the opportunities that were given to them instead of putting themselves out there and letting the voters decide," Jones said in an interview.

The other Pelosi lieutenants facing challengers:

Ways and Means Chairman Richard E. Neal of Massachusetts; Foreign Affairs Chairman Eliot L. Engel of New York; and Energy and Commerce Chairman Frank Pallone Jr. of New Jersey, who took office in late 1988 after a special election (snip)… Transportation and Infrastructure Chairman Peter A. DeFazio of Oregon, first elected in 1986; Agriculture Chairman Collin C. Peterson of Minnesota, first elected in 1990; and even Judiciary Chairman Jerrold Nadler of New York, the party's point man on impeachment proceedings, who came to Congress after a 1992 special election.

Pelosi could choose to stand up and fight for her party's soul.  But so far, she has not, and there is no sign of her recognizing that she is participating in a shameful surrender to bigotry.  At least she can claim she is helping her party return to its roots in support for slavery and Jim Crow.

Democrats used to pay lip service to "Profiles in Courage" — the title of a best-selling ghostwritten book about Democrats who embraced unpopular liberal positions because they thought they were morally correct, purportedly written by a young John F. Kennedy.

Those days are gone.  Jews will have to depend on the Republican Party alone, if they have the mental agility to realize that the party they have historically supported has turned on them.