On the 50th anniversary of the moon landing, even Google gets right what the New York Times can't

It's the 50th anniversary of the moon landing today, the greatest technical feat in the history of humanity, and the New York Times is running its coverage by the skin color numbers, sounding very similar to the old Soviet propaganda machines from those who would know:

 

 

He's right. For Americans, the moon landing ought to be a source of pride, big pride, and an occasion for national unity. Four hundred thousand Americans worked on this great enterprise, on 1960s slide-rule technology, well before the era of the pocket calculator let alone personal computer, and have never been surpassed since. If anything negative is to be brought up, it's not the color of the skin of the participants as the Times obsesses about, but why the hell we haven't been keeping it up. Space has degenerated into a bureaucratism, with a heaping helping of political correctness and not surprisingly, far less has been accomplished.

Yet remembering the moon landing -- a true moment of glory unlike any other -- may be just what it takes to get back on track. Not everyone was as awful at the New York Times in its skin-color obsession about the event.

Google of all places did itself proud too - coming up with a wonderful, wonderful doodle video about the moon landing narrated impartially and factually by astronaut Michael Collins, who told a wonderful story anyone could understand - showing just how hard the whole thing was and just how competent he and the pocket-protector guys back home directing the thing - really were. It shows the wonder Collins felt as the moon in its halo of light came into view, and the even greater wonder of seeing planet earth as no one had ever seen it.

Google got the tone right because they got the facts right. (Probably because Collins was there). It's an absolutely wonderful education that offers a rare, undistorted window on our actual history and our country's greatest moment of glory. All I can hope is that little kids are going to see this in schools, too, and get inspired. The must-see video is here.

Better still, it's not the only good one out there. Via Instapundit, here's another one showing the actual footage and how that moon landing really looked from the astronaut's point of view in the capsule. The details and reconstruction of events as they happened is absolutely invaluable for anyone trying to understand what really happened. Here's the must-watch video:

Nobody needs to be a space buff to understand any of this which is happening. But it is an essential part of all of our education, and given the hostility of the left to history, probably the only chance any kid is ever going to get to learn the truth. It is our history and it belongs to all of us.

For me, it's emotionally stirring, because I grew up with the space program as a little kid but was far too young to understand much of anything that was going on.

My dad was one of the illustrious 400,000 and I spent my early childhood through first grade in Merritt Island, Florida. All I knew was that there was a great sense of mission on this enterprise and even as a little kid, I felt proud of that. And of course as a little kid, from my little-kid perspective, I liked rocket launches that lit up the sky like daylight because it meant we could go on the roof to watch them. Going on the roof made the whole thing exciting. I asked my father what he remembered from it the other day, my dad did the closed circuit camera work on the project and wrote a book about it - and he said it was when Walter Cronkite commented on the camera work (from his CBS professional newsman's perspective, no less) throwing in a little aside in his intoning report on the launch that 'that's better camera work than what we do.' My dad said he was so surprised to hear that. And he must have been beaming.

 

It's the 50th anniversary of the moon landing today, the greatest technical feat in the history of humanity, and the New York Times is running its coverage by the skin color numbers, sounding very similar to the old Soviet propaganda machines from those who would know:

 

 

He's right. For Americans, the moon landing ought to be a source of pride, big pride, and an occasion for national unity. Four hundred thousand Americans worked on this great enterprise, on 1960s slide-rule technology, well before the era of the pocket calculator let alone personal computer, and have never been surpassed since. If anything negative is to be brought up, it's not the color of the skin of the participants as the Times obsesses about, but why the hell we haven't been keeping it up. Space has degenerated into a bureaucratism, with a heaping helping of political correctness and not surprisingly, far less has been accomplished.

Yet remembering the moon landing -- a true moment of glory unlike any other -- may be just what it takes to get back on track. Not everyone was as awful at the New York Times in its skin-color obsession about the event.

Google of all places did itself proud too - coming up with a wonderful, wonderful doodle video about the moon landing narrated impartially and factually by astronaut Michael Collins, who told a wonderful story anyone could understand - showing just how hard the whole thing was and just how competent he and the pocket-protector guys back home directing the thing - really were. It shows the wonder Collins felt as the moon in its halo of light came into view, and the even greater wonder of seeing planet earth as no one had ever seen it.

Google got the tone right because they got the facts right. (Probably because Collins was there). It's an absolutely wonderful education that offers a rare, undistorted window on our actual history and our country's greatest moment of glory. All I can hope is that little kids are going to see this in schools, too, and get inspired. The must-see video is here.

Better still, it's not the only good one out there. Via Instapundit, here's another one showing the actual footage and how that moon landing really looked from the astronaut's point of view in the capsule. The details and reconstruction of events as they happened is absolutely invaluable for anyone trying to understand what really happened. Here's the must-watch video:

Nobody needs to be a space buff to understand any of this which is happening. But it is an essential part of all of our education, and given the hostility of the left to history, probably the only chance any kid is ever going to get to learn the truth. It is our history and it belongs to all of us.

For me, it's emotionally stirring, because I grew up with the space program as a little kid but was far too young to understand much of anything that was going on.

My dad was one of the illustrious 400,000 and I spent my early childhood through first grade in Merritt Island, Florida. All I knew was that there was a great sense of mission on this enterprise and even as a little kid, I felt proud of that. And of course as a little kid, from my little-kid perspective, I liked rocket launches that lit up the sky like daylight because it meant we could go on the roof to watch them. Going on the roof made the whole thing exciting. I asked my father what he remembered from it the other day, my dad did the closed circuit camera work on the project and wrote a book about it - and he said it was when Walter Cronkite commented on the camera work (from his CBS professional newsman's perspective, no less) throwing in a little aside in his intoning report on the launch that 'that's better camera work than what we do.' My dad said he was so surprised to hear that. And he must have been beaming.