Liberal moonshot hypocrisy

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong stepped on the surface of the moon.  It was a Sunday, and though all of 13 years old, I remember it vividly.  One marvelous aspect of the journey is that America approached it with an openness that would be impossible in our new age of lies and disinformation.  From Alan Shepherd in Freedom 7 to "The Eagle Has Landed," the cameras were live and rolling.  Meanwhile, Russia was hiding information and announcing  successful missions only after the fact.  Recently, we have learned that, like all things socialist, their whole program was encircled by death.  The socialist need for secrecy even cost American lives; on March 23, 1961, a fire in an altitude chamber soaked in an atmosphere of at least 50% oxygen resulted in cosmonaut Valentin Bondarenko suffering third-degree burns over most of his body and face.  He died in horrifying pain 16 hours later.  Had the Soviet Union been forthcoming with this information, our own Grissom, White, and Chaffee might not have been subjected to a similar conditions on Apollo 1.

This past week, media outlets such as the New York Times have charged NASA with their favorite two counts of indictment; in the 1960s, there were no female astronauts and no POC astronauts.  NASA was therefore a strictly white male power structure.  That power structure is branded, of course, as white nationalism.  In the modern liberal rendering, NASA engineers weren't focused on going to the moon; rather, they were fixated upon excluding women and minorities.

That's how you get to the moon.  Just ask the press.  You focus on who won't get to the moon.

I watched the whole thing with my father.  On ABC, I loved Jules Bergman, a white Jewish man whom Ilhan Omar would disapprove of today.  Walter Cronkite over at CBS was very white.  Over at NBC, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley were, pardon me, white and white.  They were all white men!  The networks must have been focused upon excluding women and minorities from covering the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs.

The Times describes its own reporter, Richard Witkin, as a "witness to the history of aviation."  I found his picture and would describe him as white.  I wouldn't describe him as a woman.

One must consider the possibility that the media of that era were driven by dreams of white male nationalism when selecting the white men and no women who would cover the space race fifty years ago for the Times and the major networks.

Apparently, "woke" is a postmodern synonym for "liberal hypocrite."

The fashionable swindle is to take down white men and diminish any accomplishment white men may take pride in.  This whole moonshot thing of fifty years ago just makes the collective press angry.

The press is angry because it has to admit that white men landed mankind on the moon fifty years ago.

This raises the question: "Where did the 1960s-era white male nationalists at the New York Times ever get us?"

On July 20, 1969, Neil Armstrong stepped on the surface of the moon.  It was a Sunday, and though all of 13 years old, I remember it vividly.  One marvelous aspect of the journey is that America approached it with an openness that would be impossible in our new age of lies and disinformation.  From Alan Shepherd in Freedom 7 to "The Eagle Has Landed," the cameras were live and rolling.  Meanwhile, Russia was hiding information and announcing  successful missions only after the fact.  Recently, we have learned that, like all things socialist, their whole program was encircled by death.  The socialist need for secrecy even cost American lives; on March 23, 1961, a fire in an altitude chamber soaked in an atmosphere of at least 50% oxygen resulted in cosmonaut Valentin Bondarenko suffering third-degree burns over most of his body and face.  He died in horrifying pain 16 hours later.  Had the Soviet Union been forthcoming with this information, our own Grissom, White, and Chaffee might not have been subjected to a similar conditions on Apollo 1.

This past week, media outlets such as the New York Times have charged NASA with their favorite two counts of indictment; in the 1960s, there were no female astronauts and no POC astronauts.  NASA was therefore a strictly white male power structure.  That power structure is branded, of course, as white nationalism.  In the modern liberal rendering, NASA engineers weren't focused on going to the moon; rather, they were fixated upon excluding women and minorities.

That's how you get to the moon.  Just ask the press.  You focus on who won't get to the moon.

I watched the whole thing with my father.  On ABC, I loved Jules Bergman, a white Jewish man whom Ilhan Omar would disapprove of today.  Walter Cronkite over at CBS was very white.  Over at NBC, Chet Huntley and David Brinkley were, pardon me, white and white.  They were all white men!  The networks must have been focused upon excluding women and minorities from covering the Mercury, Gemini, and Apollo programs.

The Times describes its own reporter, Richard Witkin, as a "witness to the history of aviation."  I found his picture and would describe him as white.  I wouldn't describe him as a woman.

One must consider the possibility that the media of that era were driven by dreams of white male nationalism when selecting the white men and no women who would cover the space race fifty years ago for the Times and the major networks.

Apparently, "woke" is a postmodern synonym for "liberal hypocrite."

The fashionable swindle is to take down white men and diminish any accomplishment white men may take pride in.  This whole moonshot thing of fifty years ago just makes the collective press angry.

The press is angry because it has to admit that white men landed mankind on the moon fifty years ago.

This raises the question: "Where did the 1960s-era white male nationalists at the New York Times ever get us?"