Fashion modeling now a ticket to a platform for social justice warrioring?

The New York Post had an interesting human-interest story out today.  Kid gets rejected for an amusement park job based on his hair braids, then gets discovered by a modeling agency for his good looks as his plight goes public. 

It's not the first time the story has been told — how about this one about a hardened felon who got "discovered" by a modeling agency and then not only made millions, as this kid is sure to do, but also won the beautiful heiress? 

Hey, it's kind of a cool story, story-wise.  We all like stories of underdogs rising on a wave of serendipity.

But then there's this icky little kicker in the first story that rather spoils the whole thing:

His initial story helped change the amusement park company to change its policy — and also caught the eye of IMG Models, which represents catwalk stars like Gigi and Bella Hadid, Kate Moss and Ashley Graham.

"I didn't know his story then, but he had a lot of the physical features we look for in our models," IMG's head of development, Corrie Caster, told the paper.

Caster referred him to a local agency to teach him the basics, with the aim of bringing his portfolio to IMG once he is ready.

Fine and dandy.  But then...

"I hope he's successful and able to have a platform to use his voice to talk about things that mean something to him, because he will be put in those positions," Caster told the News.

"I truly believe this story has to be told, and has to be told over and over again."

So based on the natural happenstance of this kid's good looks, he's to take up modeling in order to be "able to have a platform" for social justice warrioring?  It's not about modeling anymore — it's about soapboxes?  What if he just wants to model?  His own mom said she was glad Six Flags rejected him for the job, because look how good it turned out for him.  She seems to be a realist.

Yet the modeling agency seems to be pushing him to be the next Colin Kaepernik, someone who uses his high visibility in the sports and entertainment industry to spout leftist resentment.  Modeling is just the platform to start. 

This signals something very unhealthy about how ideas are transmitted, and the celebrity culture that expounds on models, football players, Hollywood actresses, and musicians to set the terms of the political debate, all of it leftward, and all of it imbecilic.

In this kid's case, any attention he gets, if he's pushed into this, would be because of his good looks, not a merit factor.  That's some basis for authority.  Call it peak influencer.  And it's probable that we can expect more of it, in more rags-to-riches stories.

Because obviously, the modeling agencies are doing this, along with every industry that relies on mastery of the cameras.  It's not just stars talking out of turn and sinking their movie sales as they open their mouths now; it's talent agencies actively recruiting for this sort of thing.

What is this society coming to?

Image credit: Facebook screen shot.

The New York Post had an interesting human-interest story out today.  Kid gets rejected for an amusement park job based on his hair braids, then gets discovered by a modeling agency for his good looks as his plight goes public. 

It's not the first time the story has been told — how about this one about a hardened felon who got "discovered" by a modeling agency and then not only made millions, as this kid is sure to do, but also won the beautiful heiress? 

Hey, it's kind of a cool story, story-wise.  We all like stories of underdogs rising on a wave of serendipity.

But then there's this icky little kicker in the first story that rather spoils the whole thing:

His initial story helped change the amusement park company to change its policy — and also caught the eye of IMG Models, which represents catwalk stars like Gigi and Bella Hadid, Kate Moss and Ashley Graham.

"I didn't know his story then, but he had a lot of the physical features we look for in our models," IMG's head of development, Corrie Caster, told the paper.

Caster referred him to a local agency to teach him the basics, with the aim of bringing his portfolio to IMG once he is ready.

Fine and dandy.  But then...

"I hope he's successful and able to have a platform to use his voice to talk about things that mean something to him, because he will be put in those positions," Caster told the News.

"I truly believe this story has to be told, and has to be told over and over again."

So based on the natural happenstance of this kid's good looks, he's to take up modeling in order to be "able to have a platform" for social justice warrioring?  It's not about modeling anymore — it's about soapboxes?  What if he just wants to model?  His own mom said she was glad Six Flags rejected him for the job, because look how good it turned out for him.  She seems to be a realist.

Yet the modeling agency seems to be pushing him to be the next Colin Kaepernik, someone who uses his high visibility in the sports and entertainment industry to spout leftist resentment.  Modeling is just the platform to start. 

This signals something very unhealthy about how ideas are transmitted, and the celebrity culture that expounds on models, football players, Hollywood actresses, and musicians to set the terms of the political debate, all of it leftward, and all of it imbecilic.

In this kid's case, any attention he gets, if he's pushed into this, would be because of his good looks, not a merit factor.  That's some basis for authority.  Call it peak influencer.  And it's probable that we can expect more of it, in more rags-to-riches stories.

Because obviously, the modeling agencies are doing this, along with every industry that relies on mastery of the cameras.  It's not just stars talking out of turn and sinking their movie sales as they open their mouths now; it's talent agencies actively recruiting for this sort of thing.

What is this society coming to?

Image credit: Facebook screen shot.