Justice on Trial book on Kavanaugh hearing is putting the book business on trial, too

A report from a reader in the Northeast United States:

I am reading, the terrific, Justice On Trial, about the Kavanaugh hearing.

Although I followed the news every day I'm finding much new information in the book.

I bought my copy at Barnes and Noble last weekend. This weekend there are no copies at my local store. They sold out. What I am interested in finding out is will this store order more copies. When I asked one of the workers if there were more on order, she replied that she could order one for me.

When there were copies, they were not on the "Best Seller's" shelves.

Bookstores are not the only parties attempting to suppress demand for the book.  Sean Davis writes at The Federalist:

The New York Times fudged book sales data in order to deny top-five billing to the best-selling "Justice on Trial," the definitive and deeply reported account of the nomination and confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, which was written by Carrie Severino and Mollie Hemingway, a Senior Editor for The Federalist. Industry sales figures show that the New York Times ignored actual data on nationwide sales in order to depress the rankings not just for the Hemingway/Severino book, but also Mark Levin's latest book on the corruption of modern journalism.

According to Publisher's Weekly, the only public source of point-of-sale data on book sales, "Justice on Trial," was the top-selling non-fiction book published over the last week. Tara Westover's blockbuster memoir "Educated" was the top-selling non-fiction overall according to data from NPD Bookscan, but is excluded from Publisher's Weekly's list since it was first published over a year ago.

Mark Levin's "Unfreedom of the Press" came in at #2 on the best-selling list, followed by David McCullough's "The Pioneers" at #3, "Three Women" by Lisa Taddeo at #4, and Michelle Obama's "Becoming" at #5. Hemingway's and Severino's book outsold each of those books placed ahead of it on the New York Times list, according to nationwide sales data.

I am so old that I remember when leftists opposed corporations suppressing views they didn't like.

A report from a reader in the Northeast United States:

I am reading, the terrific, Justice On Trial, about the Kavanaugh hearing.

Although I followed the news every day I'm finding much new information in the book.

I bought my copy at Barnes and Noble last weekend. This weekend there are no copies at my local store. They sold out. What I am interested in finding out is will this store order more copies. When I asked one of the workers if there were more on order, she replied that she could order one for me.

When there were copies, they were not on the "Best Seller's" shelves.

Bookstores are not the only parties attempting to suppress demand for the book.  Sean Davis writes at The Federalist:

The New York Times fudged book sales data in order to deny top-five billing to the best-selling "Justice on Trial," the definitive and deeply reported account of the nomination and confirmation of Supreme Court Justice Brett Kavanaugh, which was written by Carrie Severino and Mollie Hemingway, a Senior Editor for The Federalist. Industry sales figures show that the New York Times ignored actual data on nationwide sales in order to depress the rankings not just for the Hemingway/Severino book, but also Mark Levin's latest book on the corruption of modern journalism.

According to Publisher's Weekly, the only public source of point-of-sale data on book sales, "Justice on Trial," was the top-selling non-fiction book published over the last week. Tara Westover's blockbuster memoir "Educated" was the top-selling non-fiction overall according to data from NPD Bookscan, but is excluded from Publisher's Weekly's list since it was first published over a year ago.

Mark Levin's "Unfreedom of the Press" came in at #2 on the best-selling list, followed by David McCullough's "The Pioneers" at #3, "Three Women" by Lisa Taddeo at #4, and Michelle Obama's "Becoming" at #5. Hemingway's and Severino's book outsold each of those books placed ahead of it on the New York Times list, according to nationwide sales data.

I am so old that I remember when leftists opposed corporations suppressing views they didn't like.