Despite 46 years in national politics, Joe Biden still is making rookie mistakes

It is now blindingly obvious that Joe Biden is too stupid to be president of the United States.  The sole advantage that he brings to the race, his four and a half decades of life in Washington, D.C. since entering the Senate in 1973, has produced no wisdom, not even elementary cunning.  The only thing he is good at is meeting people with a grin, shaking their hands, and feigning affability.  In a state as small as Delaware, that's enough to get elected to statewide office.  For years, I had two big consulting clients based there and traveled frequently to Wilmington.  The local taxi drivers all had shaken Joe's hand and voted for him as a result.  "He's a good guy" pretty much sums up Biden's political appeal to the ingrown political culture of The First State.

Yesterday, speaking on CNN, Biden "let slip" (as Naomi Lim of the Washington Examiner put it) that he has a collection of dirt on his opponents.  

"I mean, I get all this information about other people's pasts, and what they've done and not done. And you know, I'm just not going to go there. If we keep doing that — I mean, we should be debating what we do from here," Biden told CNN in a Friday interview, referring to the crowded field of two dozen White House hopefuls.

So, we are to believe that Joe's really a good guy, a moral exemplar who just happens to dig up dirt and threaten to use it.  But he's really above such tactics, even though he just threatened to use them if people don't lay off him.

Should Biden use the information, the change in strategy would mark a pivot from his attempt to craft an affable "Uncle Joe" persona and an abandonment of his promise to stay positive.

A man whose son has enriched himself after tagging along on vice presidential trips and signing lucrative deals with powerful interests needing the favor of the federal government should not be signaling that personal dirt is fair game.

Biden's fundamental problem is that he lacks a filter between brain and mouth.  He blurts out whatever comes into his little head and presumes that his engaging manner will carry him through.

Not at the presidential level.  In a state small enough that personal contacts can sway an election, yes, it might work, especially if the bread-and-butter issues are competently dealt with.  In the U.S. Senate, a notorious club where personal relationships and seniority mean a lot, it can get one through.

But among 20-some scorpions in a bottle, blind spots, stupidity, and clumsiness will lead to disaster.  

Biden just played his ace in the hole before all the cards are dealt.

Photo credit: YouTube screen grab.

It is now blindingly obvious that Joe Biden is too stupid to be president of the United States.  The sole advantage that he brings to the race, his four and a half decades of life in Washington, D.C. since entering the Senate in 1973, has produced no wisdom, not even elementary cunning.  The only thing he is good at is meeting people with a grin, shaking their hands, and feigning affability.  In a state as small as Delaware, that's enough to get elected to statewide office.  For years, I had two big consulting clients based there and traveled frequently to Wilmington.  The local taxi drivers all had shaken Joe's hand and voted for him as a result.  "He's a good guy" pretty much sums up Biden's political appeal to the ingrown political culture of The First State.

Yesterday, speaking on CNN, Biden "let slip" (as Naomi Lim of the Washington Examiner put it) that he has a collection of dirt on his opponents.  

"I mean, I get all this information about other people's pasts, and what they've done and not done. And you know, I'm just not going to go there. If we keep doing that — I mean, we should be debating what we do from here," Biden told CNN in a Friday interview, referring to the crowded field of two dozen White House hopefuls.

So, we are to believe that Joe's really a good guy, a moral exemplar who just happens to dig up dirt and threaten to use it.  But he's really above such tactics, even though he just threatened to use them if people don't lay off him.

Should Biden use the information, the change in strategy would mark a pivot from his attempt to craft an affable "Uncle Joe" persona and an abandonment of his promise to stay positive.

A man whose son has enriched himself after tagging along on vice presidential trips and signing lucrative deals with powerful interests needing the favor of the federal government should not be signaling that personal dirt is fair game.

Biden's fundamental problem is that he lacks a filter between brain and mouth.  He blurts out whatever comes into his little head and presumes that his engaging manner will carry him through.

Not at the presidential level.  In a state small enough that personal contacts can sway an election, yes, it might work, especially if the bread-and-butter issues are competently dealt with.  In the U.S. Senate, a notorious club where personal relationships and seniority mean a lot, it can get one through.

But among 20-some scorpions in a bottle, blind spots, stupidity, and clumsiness will lead to disaster.  

Biden just played his ace in the hole before all the cards are dealt.

Photo credit: YouTube screen grab.