Looks like Christopher Steele has cut a deal and will turn state's evidence on Russia Hoax prosecutions

I don't think it is a coincidence that just as President Trump is in the U.K., we suddenly learn that "dossier" author Christopher Steele has agreed to be questioned by U.S. authorities.  Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller reports:

Former British spy Christopher Steele has agreed to meet in London with U.S. officials regarding the dossier, The Times of London is reporting.

A source close to Steele told the newspaper he plans to meet with American authorities within the next several weeks, but only about his interactions with the FBI and only with the approval of the British government.

Steele's decision is an apparent about-face from his reported refusal to meet with U.S. investigators regarding his infamous report.

Reuters reported in May that Steele was unwilling to meet with a federal prosecutor who Attorney General William Barr tapped to lead an investigation into the origins of the Russia probe. And Politico reported on April 17 that Steele was refusing to meet with the Justice Department's office of the inspector general, which is looking into the FBI's use of the dossier to obtain surveillance warrants against Carter Page, a Trump campaign adviser.

I have all along believed that part of President Trump's mission in the U.K. was winning over British support for fully outing the role of its intelligence services in the Russia Hoax.  He would have to guarantee that the overall relationship will remain sound even if highly embarrassing facts come to light.  While speaking with outgoing P.M. May was necessary, she will soon be replaced.  I do not discount the importance of his 90-minute private conversation with Queen Elizabeth.  The next P.M. cannot take office without going to her for permission, and in that conversation she is fully capable of laying out her expectations that this affair be made public to the extent that President Trump demands.  The serene continuation of the Special Relationship with the U.S. is precisely the sort of institutional matter of utmost importance that a British monarch has a legitimate and important voice on.


YouTube screen grab (cropped).

Steele must have learned that the offer to speak with U.S. authorities was one he couldn't refuse.  Her Majesty's government would not support any efforts to resist extradition if he were to refuse cooperation and be indicted.  They might even provide documentation that would lead to his conviction.

Joe DiGenova sees that this is really big news:

Attorney General William Barr's investigators are hot on the trail of former FBI Director James Comey, former CIA Director John Brennan, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, and others who played a role in concocting the conspiracy to take down our duly elected president.

If investigators conclude that Comey, Clapper and others engaged in a criminal conspiracy — as seems increasingly likely — then Christopher Steele could easily be named as a co-defendant, which would trigger an extradition request that Britain would almost certainly honor.

Steele obviously doesn't want that to happen, which is probably why he declined a previous request for cooperation from U.S. Attorney John Durham, one of Barr's top investigators looking into the FISA warrants scandal.

We don't yet know which investigators will be interviewing Steele in the coming weeks, but it's a pretty safe bet that they've offered him some form of immunity in exchange for his candor. That should terrify the Democrats who enlisted him in their attempts to execute a Deep State coup against Trump.

If Steele spills the beans on his former handlers, the resulting prosecutions of former high-level federal officials would make Watergate seem trivial by comparison.

In addition to Comey, Clapper and Brennan, it's entirely possible that Steele's testimony will yield new insights that could eventually help to implicate even higher-ranking officials in the Obama administration.

Watch, as on Hannity last night, Joe says walls are beginning to close in:

I don't think it is a coincidence that just as President Trump is in the U.K., we suddenly learn that "dossier" author Christopher Steele has agreed to be questioned by U.S. authorities.  Chuck Ross of The Daily Caller reports:

Former British spy Christopher Steele has agreed to meet in London with U.S. officials regarding the dossier, The Times of London is reporting.

A source close to Steele told the newspaper he plans to meet with American authorities within the next several weeks, but only about his interactions with the FBI and only with the approval of the British government.

Steele's decision is an apparent about-face from his reported refusal to meet with U.S. investigators regarding his infamous report.

Reuters reported in May that Steele was unwilling to meet with a federal prosecutor who Attorney General William Barr tapped to lead an investigation into the origins of the Russia probe. And Politico reported on April 17 that Steele was refusing to meet with the Justice Department's office of the inspector general, which is looking into the FBI's use of the dossier to obtain surveillance warrants against Carter Page, a Trump campaign adviser.

I have all along believed that part of President Trump's mission in the U.K. was winning over British support for fully outing the role of its intelligence services in the Russia Hoax.  He would have to guarantee that the overall relationship will remain sound even if highly embarrassing facts come to light.  While speaking with outgoing P.M. May was necessary, she will soon be replaced.  I do not discount the importance of his 90-minute private conversation with Queen Elizabeth.  The next P.M. cannot take office without going to her for permission, and in that conversation she is fully capable of laying out her expectations that this affair be made public to the extent that President Trump demands.  The serene continuation of the Special Relationship with the U.S. is precisely the sort of institutional matter of utmost importance that a British monarch has a legitimate and important voice on.


YouTube screen grab (cropped).

Steele must have learned that the offer to speak with U.S. authorities was one he couldn't refuse.  Her Majesty's government would not support any efforts to resist extradition if he were to refuse cooperation and be indicted.  They might even provide documentation that would lead to his conviction.

Joe DiGenova sees that this is really big news:

Attorney General William Barr's investigators are hot on the trail of former FBI Director James Comey, former CIA Director John Brennan, former Director of National Intelligence James Clapper, and others who played a role in concocting the conspiracy to take down our duly elected president.

If investigators conclude that Comey, Clapper and others engaged in a criminal conspiracy — as seems increasingly likely — then Christopher Steele could easily be named as a co-defendant, which would trigger an extradition request that Britain would almost certainly honor.

Steele obviously doesn't want that to happen, which is probably why he declined a previous request for cooperation from U.S. Attorney John Durham, one of Barr's top investigators looking into the FISA warrants scandal.

We don't yet know which investigators will be interviewing Steele in the coming weeks, but it's a pretty safe bet that they've offered him some form of immunity in exchange for his candor. That should terrify the Democrats who enlisted him in their attempts to execute a Deep State coup against Trump.

If Steele spills the beans on his former handlers, the resulting prosecutions of former high-level federal officials would make Watergate seem trivial by comparison.

In addition to Comey, Clapper and Brennan, it's entirely possible that Steele's testimony will yield new insights that could eventually help to implicate even higher-ranking officials in the Obama administration.

Watch, as on Hannity last night, Joe says walls are beginning to close in: