Buttigieg weasels away from any answer about resolving border crisis, except to claim that Trump likes it

What's Indiana for "weasel"? Indiana has two native species of weasels: the long-tailed weasel and the least weasel.  Pete Buttigieg comes off as a human version of the latter. 

Asked by Axios what he'd do about the immigration crisis, South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg didn't have any answers.

But he sure as heck had a psychological reading about what President Trump must be thinking as he strives to resolve the U.S. border crisis with congressional Democrats, open-borders activists, cartel human-smuggling interests, and left-wing judges lined up against him.

Here are Buttigieg's slippery non-answers to the Axios interview questions, pretty sensible ones, with every last one of Buttigieg's answers revolving around blaming President Trump.

"Axios on HBO": "Do you acknowledge that a hundred thousand migrants crossing the southern border for the second month in a row represents a crisis?"

Pete Buttigieg: "It certainly represents a crisis of largely this administration's making."

So is it or isn't it a crisis, Pete?  And exactly how did Trump's effort to restore integrity to the U.S. border make it a crisis?  Is it better to leave it open instead?  Wouldn't the "crisis" part be in the cartels enticing migrants to come to the states, and in the leftist efforts here to stop Trump from enforcing existing U.S. law?  Which is it, Pete?

"Axios on HBO": "Is President Trump right to ask for more money for barriers and to toughen the vetting of people claiming asylum?"

Pete Buttigieg: "Look, it's worth having a conversation about border security in the context of comprehensive immigration reform, but President Trump is wrong in his approach on this issue, at every point. From the near-term part, which is horrible policies like family separation and also kind of thoughtlessly using U.S. troops as props on the border, to the big picture, which is that this would not be such a problem, if we had stability in Central American countries. And it turns out that immigration is more useful to this president as a crisis unsolved than it would be as an achievement if he actually fixed it. We could fix it. I mean there's enough of a consensus among the American people and even in Washington about the terms of bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform and yet they still can't deliver because the president needs this to be a problem for his domestic political purposes."

No answer whatsoever on that one.  Money for borders?  Tightening asylum rules?  Answer the question, doofus.

Of course, he doesn't.  Buttigieg just wants "a conversation," which is the old Kamala Harris dodge to avoid any pro-offered solutions to the public during the policy debate portion of the election, all "in the context of comprehensive immigration reform," whatever that means.  What we can tell is that he doesn't like troops at the border; he likes the border better without anyone guarding it; he doesn't like "family separations" (he doesn't mention the rent-a-kid trade the non-separation policy has created); and he claims that the bigger issue is "stability" in Central America, some of the region's oldest democracies, with Guatemala going to the polls this week.  How exactly is Central American stability something of "Trump's making," as he claims in his first answer?

"Axios on HBO": "So you're saying the president is using the border crisis to get re-elected."

Pete Buttigieg: "The president needs this crisis to get worse, even though it makes a liar out of him. I don't think he's worried about that. He's worried about the ability to —"

Huh?  Can't tell what he's saying, all I can tell is that he isn't answering the question, weaseling away further.

"Axios on HBO": "You're not saying he's literally making it worse."

Pete Buttigieg: "I don't think he cares if it gets better, but he certainly doesn't benefit from comprehensively fixing the problem. And I wouldn't put it past him to allow it to become worse in order to have it be a more divisive issue, so that he could benefit politically."

Trump wants to make it worse, so people will elect him?  He doesn't know us voters very well, does he?  And come to think of it, he doesn't seem to know much about Trump, or why we elected Trump.

Where's his border crisis solution?  Obama got called the "deporter in chief" by leftists for his weak measures to enforce rule of law at the border.  Is Buttigieg willing to allow himself to get that "deporter in chief" title, too?  Can't quite tell with any of that interview answer.  What does he mean by "comprehensive immigration reform."  In the past, that's meant amnesty for lawbreakers, ringing a dinner triangle for more to come.  Is that what he's trying to tell us he wants?  Can't tell from that interview.

All we get from him on resolving the border crisis is a promise of "a conversation." I imagine this can go on a long time as millions pour over our unguarded border and thousands now adding to the surge from from well beyond Central America.

This guy's not ready to give any answers. Yet somehow, he's gotten a spot in the Democratic Party's 20-person debate line-up where he will have considerably less time to provide his answers than he did with the more-relaxed interview setting with Axios. Sounds like a great debate setup for him actually, because he can give all the non-answers he likes. But too bad there's not a little table for him. With interview answers like this, he's not ready for prime time. 

Image credit: U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, public domain.  Modification added by Monica Showalter.

What's Indiana for "weasel"? Indiana has two native species of weasels: the long-tailed weasel and the least weasel.  Pete Buttigieg comes off as a human version of the latter. 

Asked by Axios what he'd do about the immigration crisis, South Bend, Indiana mayor Pete Buttigieg didn't have any answers.

But he sure as heck had a psychological reading about what President Trump must be thinking as he strives to resolve the U.S. border crisis with congressional Democrats, open-borders activists, cartel human-smuggling interests, and left-wing judges lined up against him.

Here are Buttigieg's slippery non-answers to the Axios interview questions, pretty sensible ones, with every last one of Buttigieg's answers revolving around blaming President Trump.

"Axios on HBO": "Do you acknowledge that a hundred thousand migrants crossing the southern border for the second month in a row represents a crisis?"

Pete Buttigieg: "It certainly represents a crisis of largely this administration's making."

So is it or isn't it a crisis, Pete?  And exactly how did Trump's effort to restore integrity to the U.S. border make it a crisis?  Is it better to leave it open instead?  Wouldn't the "crisis" part be in the cartels enticing migrants to come to the states, and in the leftist efforts here to stop Trump from enforcing existing U.S. law?  Which is it, Pete?

"Axios on HBO": "Is President Trump right to ask for more money for barriers and to toughen the vetting of people claiming asylum?"

Pete Buttigieg: "Look, it's worth having a conversation about border security in the context of comprehensive immigration reform, but President Trump is wrong in his approach on this issue, at every point. From the near-term part, which is horrible policies like family separation and also kind of thoughtlessly using U.S. troops as props on the border, to the big picture, which is that this would not be such a problem, if we had stability in Central American countries. And it turns out that immigration is more useful to this president as a crisis unsolved than it would be as an achievement if he actually fixed it. We could fix it. I mean there's enough of a consensus among the American people and even in Washington about the terms of bipartisan comprehensive immigration reform and yet they still can't deliver because the president needs this to be a problem for his domestic political purposes."

No answer whatsoever on that one.  Money for borders?  Tightening asylum rules?  Answer the question, doofus.

Of course, he doesn't.  Buttigieg just wants "a conversation," which is the old Kamala Harris dodge to avoid any pro-offered solutions to the public during the policy debate portion of the election, all "in the context of comprehensive immigration reform," whatever that means.  What we can tell is that he doesn't like troops at the border; he likes the border better without anyone guarding it; he doesn't like "family separations" (he doesn't mention the rent-a-kid trade the non-separation policy has created); and he claims that the bigger issue is "stability" in Central America, some of the region's oldest democracies, with Guatemala going to the polls this week.  How exactly is Central American stability something of "Trump's making," as he claims in his first answer?

"Axios on HBO": "So you're saying the president is using the border crisis to get re-elected."

Pete Buttigieg: "The president needs this crisis to get worse, even though it makes a liar out of him. I don't think he's worried about that. He's worried about the ability to —"

Huh?  Can't tell what he's saying, all I can tell is that he isn't answering the question, weaseling away further.

"Axios on HBO": "You're not saying he's literally making it worse."

Pete Buttigieg: "I don't think he cares if it gets better, but he certainly doesn't benefit from comprehensively fixing the problem. And I wouldn't put it past him to allow it to become worse in order to have it be a more divisive issue, so that he could benefit politically."

Trump wants to make it worse, so people will elect him?  He doesn't know us voters very well, does he?  And come to think of it, he doesn't seem to know much about Trump, or why we elected Trump.

Where's his border crisis solution?  Obama got called the "deporter in chief" by leftists for his weak measures to enforce rule of law at the border.  Is Buttigieg willing to allow himself to get that "deporter in chief" title, too?  Can't quite tell with any of that interview answer.  What does he mean by "comprehensive immigration reform."  In the past, that's meant amnesty for lawbreakers, ringing a dinner triangle for more to come.  Is that what he's trying to tell us he wants?  Can't tell from that interview.

All we get from him on resolving the border crisis is a promise of "a conversation." I imagine this can go on a long time as millions pour over our unguarded border and thousands now adding to the surge from from well beyond Central America.

This guy's not ready to give any answers. Yet somehow, he's gotten a spot in the Democratic Party's 20-person debate line-up where he will have considerably less time to provide his answers than he did with the more-relaxed interview setting with Axios. Sounds like a great debate setup for him actually, because he can give all the non-answers he likes. But too bad there's not a little table for him. With interview answers like this, he's not ready for prime time. 

Image credit: U.S. Department of Fish and Wildlife, Indiana Department of Natural Resources, public domain.  Modification added by Monica Showalter.