Gen Z Christian youth leading conservative win in EU elections

The hottest political leader in Europe is 23-year-old Christian Jordan Bardella of France, who is leading a youth rebellion to gain control of the 28-nation EU Parliament.

With unemployment for 15-24-year old at 14.9 percent in January, a youth rebellion has broken out across the European Union aimed at overthrowing the establishment to stop illegal immigration and defend European culture.

Demeaned by mainstream media as “far-right,” the leadership of the movement includes Bardella in France and 26-year old Dries Van Langenhove of Belgium. Pre-election polls for the 705 Parliament seats reveal that the Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) conservative’s coalition will more than triple its membership from 37 to 127 seats.

The size of the EFD gains are crucial to the conservative movement’s future, because the EU funds eight political coalition groups in relationship to their parliamentary membership.

With European political groups granted over $35 million for 2017, 15 percent was distributed equally, and the remaining 85 percent was distributed in proportion to their share of elected members. The EFD was the smallest group funded at 5 percent, or about $1.7 million. But pre-election polls indicate the EFD will win at least 18 percent of the membership and be eligible for $6.3 million in funding.

The energetic Jordan Bardella has risen to become spokesman and the first candidate for France’s National Rally party -- formerly the National Front. He is barnstorming France and many European nations to “upturn the table.” Bardella proclaimed to a large Paris student rally, "It is time to take back power, it is time to make us feel at home again."

Bardella lit up social media in mid-May when he gave support to Renaud Camus's The Great Replacement, a book that argues that open-borders immigration is part of a plot by progressives to overshadow the EU predominantly white French Catholic and European Christian population and its culture with non-Europeans from the Middle East and Africa.

Dries Van Langenhove has been pounding social media platforms with “clickbait” headlines regarding establishment leaders’ denials that illegal immigration is a significant issue. The most recent Google search found 1.1 billion links to “Great Replacement.”

Bardella and Van Langenhove both blame the combination of open borders and the EU Parliament’s support for radical environmental laws that are responsible for have youth unemployment rates of 20 percent in France and up to 39 percent in Greece.

French President Emmanuel Macron has disastrously led the establishment response to conservative youth under the campaign banner, "Never since the Second World War has Europe been so necessary. And yet never has Europe been in such a danger." 

Macron’s manifesto, published in mainstream newspapers on Tuesday, calls for a "European Renaissance" that will protect democracies and their electoral processes by creating a new agency to fight cyberattacks and fake news by drawing up rules to ban "hateful and violent speeches from the internet."

The Internet exploded with concerns that Macron wanted to set up a modern-day equivalent of Communist East Germany’s Ministry for State Security (Stasi) Zersetzung, the psychological warfare techniques used during the Cold War to stifle political opponents.

Chriss Street is an economist and cofounder of the New California movement.

The hottest political leader in Europe is 23-year-old Christian Jordan Bardella of France, who is leading a youth rebellion to gain control of the 28-nation EU Parliament.

With unemployment for 15-24-year old at 14.9 percent in January, a youth rebellion has broken out across the European Union aimed at overthrowing the establishment to stop illegal immigration and defend European culture.

Demeaned by mainstream media as “far-right,” the leadership of the movement includes Bardella in France and 26-year old Dries Van Langenhove of Belgium. Pre-election polls for the 705 Parliament seats reveal that the Europe of Freedom and Democracy (EFD) conservative’s coalition will more than triple its membership from 37 to 127 seats.

The size of the EFD gains are crucial to the conservative movement’s future, because the EU funds eight political coalition groups in relationship to their parliamentary membership.

With European political groups granted over $35 million for 2017, 15 percent was distributed equally, and the remaining 85 percent was distributed in proportion to their share of elected members. The EFD was the smallest group funded at 5 percent, or about $1.7 million. But pre-election polls indicate the EFD will win at least 18 percent of the membership and be eligible for $6.3 million in funding.

The energetic Jordan Bardella has risen to become spokesman and the first candidate for France’s National Rally party -- formerly the National Front. He is barnstorming France and many European nations to “upturn the table.” Bardella proclaimed to a large Paris student rally, "It is time to take back power, it is time to make us feel at home again."

Bardella lit up social media in mid-May when he gave support to Renaud Camus's The Great Replacement, a book that argues that open-borders immigration is part of a plot by progressives to overshadow the EU predominantly white French Catholic and European Christian population and its culture with non-Europeans from the Middle East and Africa.

Dries Van Langenhove has been pounding social media platforms with “clickbait” headlines regarding establishment leaders’ denials that illegal immigration is a significant issue. The most recent Google search found 1.1 billion links to “Great Replacement.”

Bardella and Van Langenhove both blame the combination of open borders and the EU Parliament’s support for radical environmental laws that are responsible for have youth unemployment rates of 20 percent in France and up to 39 percent in Greece.

French President Emmanuel Macron has disastrously led the establishment response to conservative youth under the campaign banner, "Never since the Second World War has Europe been so necessary. And yet never has Europe been in such a danger." 

Macron’s manifesto, published in mainstream newspapers on Tuesday, calls for a "European Renaissance" that will protect democracies and their electoral processes by creating a new agency to fight cyberattacks and fake news by drawing up rules to ban "hateful and violent speeches from the internet."

The Internet exploded with concerns that Macron wanted to set up a modern-day equivalent of Communist East Germany’s Ministry for State Security (Stasi) Zersetzung, the psychological warfare techniques used during the Cold War to stifle political opponents.

Chriss Street is an economist and cofounder of the New California movement.