The Chicago Sun-Times wishes you a peasant morning

In the Chicago Sun-Times Thursday morning, Phil Kadner exposes the gloomy but true condition of the liberal mind in postmodern America.  "Prepare the public for impeachment and get on with it" is soaked in bluster and paranoia.  Thinking himself a Platonic master in educating the public, Kadner provides insight as to the puny problems liberals wrestle with daily in their harrowing little lives.

"Why would anyone believe that Trump would allow himself to be fired by American voters?"

"How can anyone state without misgivings that Trump would not subvert the election process to protect his son, daughter and son-in-law?"

Such is the narrow channel of still waters our dog of a media paddle when pondering the implausible.

These rueful contemplations stem from a central meeting point that all liberals finally arrive at: if you are to be true to the Left, you must disdain fellow Americans and their choice for president.  Kadner is long experienced and has developed a style that on second glance confirms its initial impression of over-descriptive horridness, but read him anyway — a small dose won't kill you.

There is such a putrid smell surrounding our nation's capital, such a rank odor, that it should come as no shock the stench is emanating from the rotting corpse of American democracy.

Perhaps, this was inevitable.  Never in human history has so much power, so much responsibility, been invested in the peasants.

Peasants.  An offensive term for somebody considered ill mannered or uneducated.  A peasant is somebody who lives in the country — an agricultural laborer or small farmer.  According to Kadner, that's you, and that's me.  You and I freely associated with putrid smell, rank odor, and rotting corpse.

Would you care to share banter over a light supper with this little charmer?

 Kadner is way above all the "peasants," at least according to Kadner. 

Yet, among all of his inane migraine-inducing questions, I notice that he never questions himself.  To provide symmetry, I offer just a few queries.

My conservative neighbor is an engineer; this means he passed multiple courses in calculus.  Mr. Kadner, do you think you could pass a first-level course in calc?  One of my conservative students is a cardiologist.  He saves lives.  Might that be impossible if his degree were in journalism?

Are these aforementioned conservative neighbors "peasants" in your eloquent opinion, Mr. Kadner?

Too much authority has been invested in lightly educated journalists who overestimate their own curricula vitae, intellectual powers, and contribution to society.

Agricultural laborers work with dirt to provide food for all of us.  Lefty journalists play in the dirt to gain notice, approval, and awards from fellow journalists, and to circumvent the will of the people.

Who is more essential around here, Mr. Kadner?

In the Chicago Sun-Times Thursday morning, Phil Kadner exposes the gloomy but true condition of the liberal mind in postmodern America.  "Prepare the public for impeachment and get on with it" is soaked in bluster and paranoia.  Thinking himself a Platonic master in educating the public, Kadner provides insight as to the puny problems liberals wrestle with daily in their harrowing little lives.

"Why would anyone believe that Trump would allow himself to be fired by American voters?"

"How can anyone state without misgivings that Trump would not subvert the election process to protect his son, daughter and son-in-law?"

Such is the narrow channel of still waters our dog of a media paddle when pondering the implausible.

These rueful contemplations stem from a central meeting point that all liberals finally arrive at: if you are to be true to the Left, you must disdain fellow Americans and their choice for president.  Kadner is long experienced and has developed a style that on second glance confirms its initial impression of over-descriptive horridness, but read him anyway — a small dose won't kill you.

There is such a putrid smell surrounding our nation's capital, such a rank odor, that it should come as no shock the stench is emanating from the rotting corpse of American democracy.

Perhaps, this was inevitable.  Never in human history has so much power, so much responsibility, been invested in the peasants.

Peasants.  An offensive term for somebody considered ill mannered or uneducated.  A peasant is somebody who lives in the country — an agricultural laborer or small farmer.  According to Kadner, that's you, and that's me.  You and I freely associated with putrid smell, rank odor, and rotting corpse.

Would you care to share banter over a light supper with this little charmer?

 Kadner is way above all the "peasants," at least according to Kadner. 

Yet, among all of his inane migraine-inducing questions, I notice that he never questions himself.  To provide symmetry, I offer just a few queries.

My conservative neighbor is an engineer; this means he passed multiple courses in calculus.  Mr. Kadner, do you think you could pass a first-level course in calc?  One of my conservative students is a cardiologist.  He saves lives.  Might that be impossible if his degree were in journalism?

Are these aforementioned conservative neighbors "peasants" in your eloquent opinion, Mr. Kadner?

Too much authority has been invested in lightly educated journalists who overestimate their own curricula vitae, intellectual powers, and contribution to society.

Agricultural laborers work with dirt to provide food for all of us.  Lefty journalists play in the dirt to gain notice, approval, and awards from fellow journalists, and to circumvent the will of the people.

Who is more essential around here, Mr. Kadner?