Report from last night's rally outside the New York Times against its cartoon jihad

Though billed as being from 5:30 to 8:30, the rally, never much larger than at most 200–225 people, was all but over at 7 P.M. on a chilly evening in late April.  People who forgot their gloves regretted their optimism.

The issue of the day was deploring the cartoon coverage of the N.Y. Times on one occasion, though public outcry forced a tepid "deeply sorry" from the dingy Gray Lady. 

Sadly, the sanctimony, long known as inadequate where Jews and Israel are 'reported on' by this 'newspaper of record,' was torn even as the small crowd grumbled below the new face of the Times on West 41st and 8th Avenue.  The paper published yet another incredibly biased cartoon by a European graphic political artist.

Our 8 1/2 x 11 sign, in navy and dark green, read:

New York TIMES:

REPEAT

OFFENDER

Curiously, I had done the sign hours before we all learned that the paper had published yet another intolerably racist anti-Israel, anti-Trump, anti-Netanyahu panel demonizing the Times' favorite whipping boys.

The egregious cartoons, which  created a sustained uproar both abroad and in the domestic polity among Jews and Christians, come on the heels of months of unusual anti-Semitic opining by new congresswoman Ilhan Omar, a hijabed Muslim who has been only mildly chided for remarks widely considered anti-Semitic tropes using the coarsest stereotypes of Jews and Israelis. 

Those speaking failed to include prayers for the heroic woman who died in the recent Poway shooting, or the three injured of the most recent anti-Semitic incident, this one in the Chabad house in Poway, California.

The main speaker, joined by Brooklyn Democrat and longtime assemblyman Dov Hikind, was investment director and community commentator Jeff Wiesenfeld.  A surprise was the appearance of Harvard law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz, who had been visiting the Jewish Museum with his wife and learnt of the rally at the New York Times. 

The famed lawyer noted that he is a Democrat but that the publication of such Der Sturmer-like derogations of Pres. Trump and Jewish politicians such as Benjamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel and a close ally of the current administration, must not stand.  Such cartoons figured prominently in the run-up to the Holocaust, we are reminded, and helped to pave the way for the catastrophic black mark against Europe, the German people, and Hitler, of the Jewish people, more than 6 million of whom were slaughtered with barely a headline in the N.Y. Times, which spared a meager 28 headlined front pages during the entirety of the years-long Holocaust in Europe, the Far East, and Northern Africa.

Hikind admitted he was "embarrassed" that he is still a Democrat but urged attendees and Jews in the rest of the country to switch parties, as the Democrats no longer stand behind Jews or Israel as they had for so many decades.

Dershowitz deprecated the value of the Times, as he noted that their front pages and "news" coverage are now largely editorializing, not reportage or neutral coverage.  He evoked a ripple of laughter when he noted that he had probably written more articles and columns for the paper than anyone else who was not an actual staffer of the Times.  Going farther, he urged the assembled to join the activist supportive organization CAMERA, which acts as a watchdog over the country's major publications as they report on matters Israeli and Jewish here and abroad.  He excoriated (Jewish) politicians Sen. Charles Schumer and Manhattan rep. Jerrold Nadler for their blatant silence in the face of these dangerous propagandistic cartoons, but their fealty of late is distant from defense of their own, of Jews, or of Israel.

Instead, they seem, along with speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and other 'leaders' of the opposition, to back a triad of Muslim and anti-Semitic newcomers to the political scene, despite the difficult and mendacious public pronouncements of the three controversial newly elected female voices.

Occasional chants of "Shame on the New York Times!" broke out.  Passersby stopped to listen, and occasional cars and vehicles passing honked their horns in support.  "Where is Schumer?" was asked loudly by Assemblyman Hikind.  Schumer is almost comic in his usual headline-grabbing grandstanding on almost any issue.  Yet he has been silent here.

Popular speaker and radio host Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, also from Brooklyn, spoke.  Wiesenthal Center's Michael Cohen spoke out against the newspaper for its slack reportage, its taunting cartoons and op-eds.

Speakers noted that had these cartoons lambasted any other religious or minority group, such as Muslims or illegal aliens, the uproar would have shaken the Times out of its sanctimonious repeat-offense smugness.

Though billed as being from 5:30 to 8:30, the rally, never much larger than at most 200–225 people, was all but over at 7 P.M. on a chilly evening in late April.  People who forgot their gloves regretted their optimism.

The issue of the day was deploring the cartoon coverage of the N.Y. Times on one occasion, though public outcry forced a tepid "deeply sorry" from the dingy Gray Lady. 

Sadly, the sanctimony, long known as inadequate where Jews and Israel are 'reported on' by this 'newspaper of record,' was torn even as the small crowd grumbled below the new face of the Times on West 41st and 8th Avenue.  The paper published yet another incredibly biased cartoon by a European graphic political artist.

Our 8 1/2 x 11 sign, in navy and dark green, read:

New York TIMES:

REPEAT

OFFENDER

Curiously, I had done the sign hours before we all learned that the paper had published yet another intolerably racist anti-Israel, anti-Trump, anti-Netanyahu panel demonizing the Times' favorite whipping boys.

The egregious cartoons, which  created a sustained uproar both abroad and in the domestic polity among Jews and Christians, come on the heels of months of unusual anti-Semitic opining by new congresswoman Ilhan Omar, a hijabed Muslim who has been only mildly chided for remarks widely considered anti-Semitic tropes using the coarsest stereotypes of Jews and Israelis. 

Those speaking failed to include prayers for the heroic woman who died in the recent Poway shooting, or the three injured of the most recent anti-Semitic incident, this one in the Chabad house in Poway, California.

The main speaker, joined by Brooklyn Democrat and longtime assemblyman Dov Hikind, was investment director and community commentator Jeff Wiesenfeld.  A surprise was the appearance of Harvard law professor emeritus Alan Dershowitz, who had been visiting the Jewish Museum with his wife and learnt of the rally at the New York Times. 

The famed lawyer noted that he is a Democrat but that the publication of such Der Sturmer-like derogations of Pres. Trump and Jewish politicians such as Benjamin Netanyahu, prime minister of Israel and a close ally of the current administration, must not stand.  Such cartoons figured prominently in the run-up to the Holocaust, we are reminded, and helped to pave the way for the catastrophic black mark against Europe, the German people, and Hitler, of the Jewish people, more than 6 million of whom were slaughtered with barely a headline in the N.Y. Times, which spared a meager 28 headlined front pages during the entirety of the years-long Holocaust in Europe, the Far East, and Northern Africa.

Hikind admitted he was "embarrassed" that he is still a Democrat but urged attendees and Jews in the rest of the country to switch parties, as the Democrats no longer stand behind Jews or Israel as they had for so many decades.

Dershowitz deprecated the value of the Times, as he noted that their front pages and "news" coverage are now largely editorializing, not reportage or neutral coverage.  He evoked a ripple of laughter when he noted that he had probably written more articles and columns for the paper than anyone else who was not an actual staffer of the Times.  Going farther, he urged the assembled to join the activist supportive organization CAMERA, which acts as a watchdog over the country's major publications as they report on matters Israeli and Jewish here and abroad.  He excoriated (Jewish) politicians Sen. Charles Schumer and Manhattan rep. Jerrold Nadler for their blatant silence in the face of these dangerous propagandistic cartoons, but their fealty of late is distant from defense of their own, of Jews, or of Israel.

Instead, they seem, along with speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi and other 'leaders' of the opposition, to back a triad of Muslim and anti-Semitic newcomers to the political scene, despite the difficult and mendacious public pronouncements of the three controversial newly elected female voices.

Occasional chants of "Shame on the New York Times!" broke out.  Passersby stopped to listen, and occasional cars and vehicles passing honked their horns in support.  "Where is Schumer?" was asked loudly by Assemblyman Hikind.  Schumer is almost comic in his usual headline-grabbing grandstanding on almost any issue.  Yet he has been silent here.

Popular speaker and radio host Rabbi Joseph Potasnik, also from Brooklyn, spoke.  Wiesenthal Center's Michael Cohen spoke out against the newspaper for its slack reportage, its taunting cartoons and op-eds.

Speakers noted that had these cartoons lambasted any other religious or minority group, such as Muslims or illegal aliens, the uproar would have shaken the Times out of its sanctimonious repeat-offense smugness.