Omar calls US Black Hawk troops who tried to deliver aid to her own Somali clan 'Satan'

Fresh from letting us know about her Jew-hatred, her 9/11 flippancy, her support leniency for terrorists and her love for 9/11's unindicted co-conspirators, her willingness to stick up for the brutal Maduro dictatorship in Venezuela, and other outrages, Rep. Ilhan Omar also would have us know about the little cold spot she holds for U.S. troops, the ones from the 1992 Black Hawk Down incident, the very U.S. Marines who tried to deliver aid to her starving clan in Somalia.

According to the New York Post:

The controversial Minnesota lawmaker claimed that “thousands” died in the Battle of Mogadishu — though most reputable sources put the contested body count much lower, according [to] a report by the Investigative Project on Terrorism.

Omar made the claim in a 2017 Twitter thread about terror attacks in Somalia when she wrote the tweet, which the Project dug up Monday.

“In his selective memory, he forgets to also mention the thousands of Somalis killed by the American forces that day! #NotTodaySatan,” Omar wrote in response to a Twitter user’s lament that 19 US service members were killed and 73 injured in the battle.

Seriously, she called them 'Satan'? And she said it a lot more recently than she did with her 2012 'Israel has hypnotized the world' tweet. What amazing ingratitude. She called the people who were trying to deliver aid to her starving clan, the Mateerveen of the Somali north, 'Satan' and fliply said 'Not today, Satan' on the question of whether there should be appreciation for the Americans who died for her own people. Her country was a hellhole and the Marines came in five years after she left it. Her family were among the people who were so badly off as victims of Somalia's khat-chewing warlords that they had fled the country -- for a four-year stint in a Kenyan refugee camp as a better alternative to life in Somalia -- until they hit the jackpot as refugees and came to America. That kind of ingratitude is some strange stuff.

It points to a reflexive anti-Americanism that's visible in pretty much every statement she makes. And her resentment was there from the beginning - she hated America from the moment she landed here, as she told the New York Times, calling it a land of 'hypocrisy.' She "concluded that it was not the golden land that she had heard about," the Times gently intoned. 

And safely ensconced here and buried in her resentment, it sure as heck wasn't a matter of personal experience she was talking about as she 'Satanized' U.S. troops who made their intervention four or five years after she got out safely. Having that strange an attitude suggests that she was indoctrinated somewhere along the lines by fourth-world leftists, the kind V.S. Naipaul wrote about, who would have thought a drug-addled brutal warlord such as Mohammed Farah Aidid, a 'strong leader,' and any attempt to get rid of him for starving people something Satan would do.

A U.S. serviceman, Sergeant Major Kyle Lamb, who was there at the Black Hawk Down scene, explained for the Federalist what the intervention was all about, raising even more awful questions about whom Omar was rooting for:

I take special exception to Omar’s disgusting comments because I served in the Battle of Mogadishu, which was later portrayed in the movie “Black Hawk Down.” If you aren’t familiar with the real story behind “Black Hawk Down,” let me set the scene for you.

In late 1992, President George H. W. Bush launched Operation Restore Hope in support of United Nations initiatives to restore some semblance of law and order to Somalia, which was wracked by devastating famine and violent warlords eager to use the chaos and hopelessness to establish corrupt fiefdoms.

The purpose of American involvement in Somalia was to protect the peacekeepers tasked with the near-impossible mission of delivering vital food and medical supplies to the starving, war-torn population. As the aid grew, so did the opportunities for graft from warring clans who saw the humanitarian crisis as a way to cement their power throughout the country.

He righteously concludes:

The simple truth is that Omar enjoys the fruits of American combat deaths, yet she can’t even bring herself to acknowledge the ultimate sacrifice that was made on her behalf, either as a Somali or an American. Her clan didn’t stand a chance against Aidid and Habar Gidirs, so I don’t blame her for leaving. But I do blame her for attacking those of us who had zero personal interest or investment in her nation for doing our jobs on behalf of our country. And I blame her for smearing American servicemen because we answered the call of our nation to address the violent barbarism of hers.

After reading that, one can only conclude that Omar hates the United States more reflexively than anyone had imagined. It's very easy to see why she opposes aid to starving Venezuelans, given the level of concern she has even for her own people. When then-candidate Trump said that importing Somalis into the U.S. was a problem, he could have been looking at Omar.

Image credit: U.S. Army via Wikimedia Commons, public domain

Fresh from letting us know about her Jew-hatred, her 9/11 flippancy, her support leniency for terrorists and her love for 9/11's unindicted co-conspirators, her willingness to stick up for the brutal Maduro dictatorship in Venezuela, and other outrages, Rep. Ilhan Omar also would have us know about the little cold spot she holds for U.S. troops, the ones from the 1992 Black Hawk Down incident, the very U.S. Marines who tried to deliver aid to her starving clan in Somalia.

According to the New York Post:

The controversial Minnesota lawmaker claimed that “thousands” died in the Battle of Mogadishu — though most reputable sources put the contested body count much lower, according [to] a report by the Investigative Project on Terrorism.

Omar made the claim in a 2017 Twitter thread about terror attacks in Somalia when she wrote the tweet, which the Project dug up Monday.

“In his selective memory, he forgets to also mention the thousands of Somalis killed by the American forces that day! #NotTodaySatan,” Omar wrote in response to a Twitter user’s lament that 19 US service members were killed and 73 injured in the battle.

Seriously, she called them 'Satan'? And she said it a lot more recently than she did with her 2012 'Israel has hypnotized the world' tweet. What amazing ingratitude. She called the people who were trying to deliver aid to her starving clan, the Mateerveen of the Somali north, 'Satan' and fliply said 'Not today, Satan' on the question of whether there should be appreciation for the Americans who died for her own people. Her country was a hellhole and the Marines came in five years after she left it. Her family were among the people who were so badly off as victims of Somalia's khat-chewing warlords that they had fled the country -- for a four-year stint in a Kenyan refugee camp as a better alternative to life in Somalia -- until they hit the jackpot as refugees and came to America. That kind of ingratitude is some strange stuff.

It points to a reflexive anti-Americanism that's visible in pretty much every statement she makes. And her resentment was there from the beginning - she hated America from the moment she landed here, as she told the New York Times, calling it a land of 'hypocrisy.' She "concluded that it was not the golden land that she had heard about," the Times gently intoned. 

And safely ensconced here and buried in her resentment, it sure as heck wasn't a matter of personal experience she was talking about as she 'Satanized' U.S. troops who made their intervention four or five years after she got out safely. Having that strange an attitude suggests that she was indoctrinated somewhere along the lines by fourth-world leftists, the kind V.S. Naipaul wrote about, who would have thought a drug-addled brutal warlord such as Mohammed Farah Aidid, a 'strong leader,' and any attempt to get rid of him for starving people something Satan would do.

A U.S. serviceman, Sergeant Major Kyle Lamb, who was there at the Black Hawk Down scene, explained for the Federalist what the intervention was all about, raising even more awful questions about whom Omar was rooting for:

I take special exception to Omar’s disgusting comments because I served in the Battle of Mogadishu, which was later portrayed in the movie “Black Hawk Down.” If you aren’t familiar with the real story behind “Black Hawk Down,” let me set the scene for you.

In late 1992, President George H. W. Bush launched Operation Restore Hope in support of United Nations initiatives to restore some semblance of law and order to Somalia, which was wracked by devastating famine and violent warlords eager to use the chaos and hopelessness to establish corrupt fiefdoms.

The purpose of American involvement in Somalia was to protect the peacekeepers tasked with the near-impossible mission of delivering vital food and medical supplies to the starving, war-torn population. As the aid grew, so did the opportunities for graft from warring clans who saw the humanitarian crisis as a way to cement their power throughout the country.

He righteously concludes:

The simple truth is that Omar enjoys the fruits of American combat deaths, yet she can’t even bring herself to acknowledge the ultimate sacrifice that was made on her behalf, either as a Somali or an American. Her clan didn’t stand a chance against Aidid and Habar Gidirs, so I don’t blame her for leaving. But I do blame her for attacking those of us who had zero personal interest or investment in her nation for doing our jobs on behalf of our country. And I blame her for smearing American servicemen because we answered the call of our nation to address the violent barbarism of hers.

After reading that, one can only conclude that Omar hates the United States more reflexively than anyone had imagined. It's very easy to see why she opposes aid to starving Venezuelans, given the level of concern she has even for her own people. When then-candidate Trump said that importing Somalis into the U.S. was a problem, he could have been looking at Omar.

Image credit: U.S. Army via Wikimedia Commons, public domain