New York Yankees trade baseball victories for ... the United Nations Climate Agreement

They're not winning many baseball games, so the New York Yankees have decided that virtue-signaling is the next-best thing.

Get a load of this stupidity from whoever it is now running the Bronx Bombers:

 

 

Presumably, their fans are to be satisfied with that in lieu of winning games.

It goes to show how far off-mission the team has become. The U.S. has wisely pulled out of that rubbishy accord on principle alone, all the more strikingly because its emissions are below target while Europe's still run high. How a baseball team could save the earth by signing onto United Nations bureaucratic oversight over how many gallons of water they are drinking or how many lights they are using to light up night games is pretty curious.

And more to the point, it signals a loss of focus for the owners of the team, whose actual business is winning ball games, diverting that one job to satisfaction at obeying international bureaucrats. Sound like a great trade? Well, to them, it does. No wonder they're 3 wins-4 losses in their American League division, and rank a lowly 10th in their standings.

Here's a sampling of how New York Yankee fans took that announcement:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In New York, they call that 'a Bronx cheer.'

No kidding.

 

They're not winning many baseball games, so the New York Yankees have decided that virtue-signaling is the next-best thing.

Get a load of this stupidity from whoever it is now running the Bronx Bombers:

 

 

Presumably, their fans are to be satisfied with that in lieu of winning games.

It goes to show how far off-mission the team has become. The U.S. has wisely pulled out of that rubbishy accord on principle alone, all the more strikingly because its emissions are below target while Europe's still run high. How a baseball team could save the earth by signing onto United Nations bureaucratic oversight over how many gallons of water they are drinking or how many lights they are using to light up night games is pretty curious.

And more to the point, it signals a loss of focus for the owners of the team, whose actual business is winning ball games, diverting that one job to satisfaction at obeying international bureaucrats. Sound like a great trade? Well, to them, it does. No wonder they're 3 wins-4 losses in their American League division, and rank a lowly 10th in their standings.

Here's a sampling of how New York Yankee fans took that announcement:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

In New York, they call that 'a Bronx cheer.'

No kidding.