Raise the voting age to 30

In a desperate attempt  to shore up the failing Democratic voter base, House speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-crazy California) has suggested lowering the voting age to 16, "to capture kids" early, as she so revealingly disclosed.

"I myself have always been for lowering the voting age to 16," Pelosi said.  "I think it's really important to capture kids when they're in high school, when they're interested in all of this, when they're learning about government, to be able to vote.

Oh yeah, at that age, they're so "interested in all of this," as Olivia Jade, 19,  the infamous  faux high-SAT rowing college student at USC, demonstrated.

"I don't know how much of school I'm going to attend, but I'm going to go in and talk to my deans and everyone and hope that I can try to balance it all," she told her viewers. "But I do want the experience of game days, partying — I don't really care about school, as you guys all know."

What she is interested in is her lucrative social media career as an "influencer" (exactly what it looks like), now over, not government or voting.  Not that there's anything wrong with that, but think of her 16-year-old self voting and influencing hundreds of thousands of other equally disinterested and clueless potential voters on the basis of the candidate's looks.  Or shade of lipstick.  Yeah, frightening.  But possible.  

Okay, she's a rich California adolescent, but other than that — a big "that," admittedly — she's typical of most teens who are bored with their government class; it is only the most woke ones who puppet obligingly for the feel-good demonstration of the time.  Now they're protesting "climate change" and advocating gun control; a few years ago, it was against mandatory dress codes.

Meanwhile, their older siblings are also not indicating a passionate interest in government except, like their elders, wanting more free stuff.  But somehow,  students, who are supposedly drowning in education debt, find the cash and are now destructively partying with abandon in Florida, on South Padre Island, and at other popular spots for the most interesting educational experience of all: Spring Break.  Sure, not all college (and even non-college) students are behaving this way.  But, for most under-30s, voting and government, except what it can give them for free,  is just not that important.

Scientifically, you can't blame them; they're just doing what comes naturally.

People do not become proper adults until they have entered their thirties, according to brain researchers who say hard definitions of adulthood are looking "increasingly absurd". ...

Processes that involve boosting the conductivity of nerves, building neural networks and "pruning" away unwanted connections begin in the womb and continue for decades.

A burst of upheaval in the brain is thought to account for the notoriously difficult behaviour of adolescents, but does not necessarily end once people leave their teens.

So there was a reason the Baby-Boomers' favorite phrase was "Don't trust anyone over 30."  It meant adulthood.  Growing up.  Responsibility.  But slowly, gradually, and probably against their will, the Baby-Boomers turned 30.  And then 40.  Onward.  Slowly, their parents seemingly made sense.  Most of them took on adulthood more or less successfully, raising a new generation whose brains are still developing.

The early Baby-Boomers are now in their early 70s (eek!), the latter ones in their mid-50s (argh!), with many of them probably looking back at their youthful thoughts and actions with varying degrees of regret and nostalgia.  Ask them.  They might even admit it.

Now, many, many 30-plus people are totally immature and unrealistic, while there are some amazingly mature under-25s.  Generalizations are general.  But for the good of democracy and our safety, let's all advocate for limiting the vote to those who have reached their 30th birthday.  And are citizens of this country.

In a desperate attempt  to shore up the failing Democratic voter base, House speaker Rep. Nancy Pelosi (D-crazy California) has suggested lowering the voting age to 16, "to capture kids" early, as she so revealingly disclosed.

"I myself have always been for lowering the voting age to 16," Pelosi said.  "I think it's really important to capture kids when they're in high school, when they're interested in all of this, when they're learning about government, to be able to vote.

Oh yeah, at that age, they're so "interested in all of this," as Olivia Jade, 19,  the infamous  faux high-SAT rowing college student at USC, demonstrated.

"I don't know how much of school I'm going to attend, but I'm going to go in and talk to my deans and everyone and hope that I can try to balance it all," she told her viewers. "But I do want the experience of game days, partying — I don't really care about school, as you guys all know."

What she is interested in is her lucrative social media career as an "influencer" (exactly what it looks like), now over, not government or voting.  Not that there's anything wrong with that, but think of her 16-year-old self voting and influencing hundreds of thousands of other equally disinterested and clueless potential voters on the basis of the candidate's looks.  Or shade of lipstick.  Yeah, frightening.  But possible.  

Okay, she's a rich California adolescent, but other than that — a big "that," admittedly — she's typical of most teens who are bored with their government class; it is only the most woke ones who puppet obligingly for the feel-good demonstration of the time.  Now they're protesting "climate change" and advocating gun control; a few years ago, it was against mandatory dress codes.

Meanwhile, their older siblings are also not indicating a passionate interest in government except, like their elders, wanting more free stuff.  But somehow,  students, who are supposedly drowning in education debt, find the cash and are now destructively partying with abandon in Florida, on South Padre Island, and at other popular spots for the most interesting educational experience of all: Spring Break.  Sure, not all college (and even non-college) students are behaving this way.  But, for most under-30s, voting and government, except what it can give them for free,  is just not that important.

Scientifically, you can't blame them; they're just doing what comes naturally.

People do not become proper adults until they have entered their thirties, according to brain researchers who say hard definitions of adulthood are looking "increasingly absurd". ...

Processes that involve boosting the conductivity of nerves, building neural networks and "pruning" away unwanted connections begin in the womb and continue for decades.

A burst of upheaval in the brain is thought to account for the notoriously difficult behaviour of adolescents, but does not necessarily end once people leave their teens.

So there was a reason the Baby-Boomers' favorite phrase was "Don't trust anyone over 30."  It meant adulthood.  Growing up.  Responsibility.  But slowly, gradually, and probably against their will, the Baby-Boomers turned 30.  And then 40.  Onward.  Slowly, their parents seemingly made sense.  Most of them took on adulthood more or less successfully, raising a new generation whose brains are still developing.

The early Baby-Boomers are now in their early 70s (eek!), the latter ones in their mid-50s (argh!), with many of them probably looking back at their youthful thoughts and actions with varying degrees of regret and nostalgia.  Ask them.  They might even admit it.

Now, many, many 30-plus people are totally immature and unrealistic, while there are some amazingly mature under-25s.  Generalizations are general.  But for the good of democracy and our safety, let's all advocate for limiting the vote to those who have reached their 30th birthday.  And are citizens of this country.