Most sanctuary cities receive grants despite administration efforts to block them

Dspite efforts by the Trump Justice Department, almost all sanctuary states and cities who were awarded federal law enforcement grants in 2017 received them.

Out of 30 cities and states that Congress authorized to receive the funding, only one - Oregon - has yet to be approved for the grant.

The Hill:

Many localities targeted by the Justice Department in 2017 for a freeze in grant funding have won legal victories against the Justice Department over the funding, such as the U.S. Conference of Mayors which won a victory last year on behalf of its member cities which temporarily prevented the Justice Department from freezing the funds.

The Conference of Mayors is now working on the 2018 grants, which were also withheld in many cases, a spokesperson told the Justice Department.

Another victory against the Justice Department was won by Chicago city officials, who received a permanent injunction against the Justice Department over the freeze for the 2017 funds and sued the Trump administration again last year over 2018 funds.

“We have already won this battle in court, and yet the Attorney General continues to disregard numerous federal court rulings that have repeatedly said he does not have the authority to add these requirements to a grant program created by Congress,” city attorney Ed Siskel said last year.

While the executive branch usually enjoys broad authority to dispense funds authorized by Congress, the courts have ruled that in this case, they don't. 

It is, as it always has been, an issue for Congress. Over the years, Republicans have tried to pass legislation that would deny some federal law enforcement funds to cities and states that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration authorities. The problem has been Senate Democrats who have refused to even debate a sanctuary city bill. Republicans have not been able to reach the 60 vote threshold that would overcome the Democrat's filibuster.

Some two thirds of Americans oppose sanctuary cities. Eventually, some of the court cases that open borders advocates have won will make it to the Supreme Court. The administration probably won't have any better luck there. And with Congress now divided, there is no chance any legislation that would punish sanctuary cities for flouting federal immigration law will become law.

Dspite efforts by the Trump Justice Department, almost all sanctuary states and cities who were awarded federal law enforcement grants in 2017 received them.

Out of 30 cities and states that Congress authorized to receive the funding, only one - Oregon - has yet to be approved for the grant.

The Hill:

Many localities targeted by the Justice Department in 2017 for a freeze in grant funding have won legal victories against the Justice Department over the funding, such as the U.S. Conference of Mayors which won a victory last year on behalf of its member cities which temporarily prevented the Justice Department from freezing the funds.

The Conference of Mayors is now working on the 2018 grants, which were also withheld in many cases, a spokesperson told the Justice Department.

Another victory against the Justice Department was won by Chicago city officials, who received a permanent injunction against the Justice Department over the freeze for the 2017 funds and sued the Trump administration again last year over 2018 funds.

“We have already won this battle in court, and yet the Attorney General continues to disregard numerous federal court rulings that have repeatedly said he does not have the authority to add these requirements to a grant program created by Congress,” city attorney Ed Siskel said last year.

While the executive branch usually enjoys broad authority to dispense funds authorized by Congress, the courts have ruled that in this case, they don't. 

It is, as it always has been, an issue for Congress. Over the years, Republicans have tried to pass legislation that would deny some federal law enforcement funds to cities and states that refuse to cooperate with federal immigration authorities. The problem has been Senate Democrats who have refused to even debate a sanctuary city bill. Republicans have not been able to reach the 60 vote threshold that would overcome the Democrat's filibuster.

Some two thirds of Americans oppose sanctuary cities. Eventually, some of the court cases that open borders advocates have won will make it to the Supreme Court. The administration probably won't have any better luck there. And with Congress now divided, there is no chance any legislation that would punish sanctuary cities for flouting federal immigration law will become law.