How much sympathy for pregnant illegal border-crossers is too much?

Back on November 26, Maryury Hernandez, a God-fearing pregnant migrant from Honduras, entered the country with her husband and three-year-old son in search of "better lives" for her children and "to keep them safe" (so she makes the hazardous trek north?), says journalist Ruben Navarrette, who is "extremely grateful for his citizenship."  The problem is, she entered illegally, which makes her eligible for deportation.  "I feel like a criminal," said Maryury.  She is a criminal.

A pregnant foreigner may go to the U.S. to give birth.  She doesn't violate any U.S. laws if she has a visa.  Still, U.S. Customs, strict on pregnant foreigners entering the country, may refuse her entry.  Maryury didn't bother to apply for a visa.  She caravanned north, and her handlers quickly put her in the hands of immigration agents who caringly whisked her off to an excellent environment for giving birth.  She gave birth on November 27 – a bouncing baby boy.  Just another drop in the anchor-baby bucket?  

While hosting a show on "a conservative radio station" in San Diego, citizen-journalist Navarrette listened to callers repeat "the old trope advanced by cable news hosts that babies born on U.S. soil somehow 'anchor' their parents to the United States."   

People should know that babies born on U.S. soil to foreign parents don't anchor their parents to the United States.  Apparently, Maryury's baby has become a U.S. citizen by jus soli, yet Maryury is eligible for deportation.  So it's back to Honduras for mother and child, or it's back to Honduras for mother sans child, who goes into foster care, whether mother likes it or not, though she probably likes it – at least her child has a better life.

Maryury has no right to live in this country.  She is eligible for deportation, yet, here she is, making her way through our court system, slowly, due to the excessive demands being made on it.  Meanwhile, an American woman, a volunteer, houses her in this country, and she doesn't see herself as a criminal, nor do plenty of others, for what it's worth.

What if America were to dismiss its immigration agents in one fell swoop, thus halting the enforcement of its immigration laws?  Sounds far-fetched?  Who would have thought that members of Congress would call for the end of ICE?  Imagine the influx of migrants, the chaos: conditions in cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco would become worse, to the point of becoming impossible to live in, because migrants struggling to survive there would contribute as much or more to the worsening conditions (e.g., greater crime, more trash, poorer sanitation, etc.) as citizens.

The reader should not feel sorry for Maryury.  Rather, he should feel anger for her.  Look what she put her three-year old through, trekking north to the border.

Citizen-journalist Navarrette is dangerously soft-hearted (and anyone else who thinks like him).  He is a drunkard, drunk on the w(h)ine of liberalism.  His plea for Maryury – and other migrants who enter the country illegally (I presume) looking for a "better life" – is maudlin and given as a rationalization for the commission of a crime.  There can be no rationalization for crime.  Meanwhile, look what's happening in our cities. 

Citizens should not denigrate immigration agents; they should support them for the good of the immigration system and for the good of the country.

Build the wall.  A wall would help.

Back on November 26, Maryury Hernandez, a God-fearing pregnant migrant from Honduras, entered the country with her husband and three-year-old son in search of "better lives" for her children and "to keep them safe" (so she makes the hazardous trek north?), says journalist Ruben Navarrette, who is "extremely grateful for his citizenship."  The problem is, she entered illegally, which makes her eligible for deportation.  "I feel like a criminal," said Maryury.  She is a criminal.

A pregnant foreigner may go to the U.S. to give birth.  She doesn't violate any U.S. laws if she has a visa.  Still, U.S. Customs, strict on pregnant foreigners entering the country, may refuse her entry.  Maryury didn't bother to apply for a visa.  She caravanned north, and her handlers quickly put her in the hands of immigration agents who caringly whisked her off to an excellent environment for giving birth.  She gave birth on November 27 – a bouncing baby boy.  Just another drop in the anchor-baby bucket?  

While hosting a show on "a conservative radio station" in San Diego, citizen-journalist Navarrette listened to callers repeat "the old trope advanced by cable news hosts that babies born on U.S. soil somehow 'anchor' their parents to the United States."   

People should know that babies born on U.S. soil to foreign parents don't anchor their parents to the United States.  Apparently, Maryury's baby has become a U.S. citizen by jus soli, yet Maryury is eligible for deportation.  So it's back to Honduras for mother and child, or it's back to Honduras for mother sans child, who goes into foster care, whether mother likes it or not, though she probably likes it – at least her child has a better life.

Maryury has no right to live in this country.  She is eligible for deportation, yet, here she is, making her way through our court system, slowly, due to the excessive demands being made on it.  Meanwhile, an American woman, a volunteer, houses her in this country, and she doesn't see herself as a criminal, nor do plenty of others, for what it's worth.

What if America were to dismiss its immigration agents in one fell swoop, thus halting the enforcement of its immigration laws?  Sounds far-fetched?  Who would have thought that members of Congress would call for the end of ICE?  Imagine the influx of migrants, the chaos: conditions in cities like Los Angeles and San Francisco would become worse, to the point of becoming impossible to live in, because migrants struggling to survive there would contribute as much or more to the worsening conditions (e.g., greater crime, more trash, poorer sanitation, etc.) as citizens.

The reader should not feel sorry for Maryury.  Rather, he should feel anger for her.  Look what she put her three-year old through, trekking north to the border.

Citizen-journalist Navarrette is dangerously soft-hearted (and anyone else who thinks like him).  He is a drunkard, drunk on the w(h)ine of liberalism.  His plea for Maryury – and other migrants who enter the country illegally (I presume) looking for a "better life" – is maudlin and given as a rationalization for the commission of a crime.  There can be no rationalization for crime.  Meanwhile, look what's happening in our cities. 

Citizens should not denigrate immigration agents; they should support them for the good of the immigration system and for the good of the country.

Build the wall.  A wall would help.