Venezuela's dictator looks to a lifeline from the helping hands of the UN

On second thought, maybe taking the aid wasn't such a bad idea after all.

Such is the thinking of Venezuelan dictator Nicolás Maduro, who seems to be reaching out to the United Nations for aid in the wake of the hideous socialist failure of the Venezuelan economy.

According to the Washington Post:

CARACAS, Venezuela – Venezuela may have reached a tipping point.

The country, of course, is still a mess, with almost 12 percent of the population malnourished and infectious diseases spreading rapidly, according to UNICEF.  Making matters worse, an independent national survey of 40 hospitals found that a third of beds aren't operative, half of emergency rooms do not have vital medicines, and 95 percent of CT scans and 51 percent of X-ray machines aren't working.

So why the celebration among some Venezuela watchers?  It's because the government of President Nicolás Maduro has essentially admitted the depths of the humanitarian crisis in his country and agreed to accept some financial help – albeit a modest amount.

Not exactly an advertisement as to the glories of socialism.

What it shows is that socialism is no road to self-sufficiency – it actually makes a country permanently dependent on the international bureaucracies – the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the Hague courts, the World Bank, joining the welfare class of nations that aren't really nations without the aid, and putting them in a position of always looking for a handout, not primarily to feed the people, but to prop the regime – and its way of governing – up.

Studies show that becoming one of those nations that's always looking to the U.N. for help is a great route to permanent underdevelopment.  Why?  Actual nations are nations because they can hold themselves up, pay their way, live like adults instead of children.  Anything else, and they end up as wards of some empire.  In this case, Maduro is choosing the U.N.

That reveals a lot about where Venezuela is heading – its pattern downstream and off the falls is exactly that of other socialist regimes, starting with its mentor-state, Cuba.

A socialist always looks to another socialist, a bigger socialist, to bail him out, because socialism is inherently unsustainable.  Castro did it, using the Soviet Union when his hellhole went bust, and then Venezuela until the money ran out.  Vietnam, Laos, Mongolia, Ethiopia, Allende's Chile – they've all been Soviet client states living on handouts.  Someone supports North Korea.  Surprise: It's communist China.

Note that Maduro refuses to take any of our money to help, as President Trump generously offered.  No, he wants only U.N. money – and International Monetary Fund money.  He's a beggar who's going to be a chooser.

With Hugo Chávez cheerleader Michelle Bachelet now running the U.N. agency Maduro is seeking help from, one can expect that this will be a crony-cozy relationship.  Bachelet is a Chilean lefty strongly connected to Allende's Chile and an ex-president of Chile who left power on sour terms, as well as a big fan of the United Nations with all its money and power.  Now she's got a new gig there and is one of the officials who's going to be propping up the Venezuelan hellhole regime with U.N. money, ensuring his permanent state of power.

Get a load of the adoration from this photo of the two in Costa Rica three years ago.  It's love...


Maduro and Bachelet in 2015.  Source: Gobierno de Chile, CC BY-SA 2.0.

That looks like the next stage of the game in Venezuela's long socialist slide downward – becoming a permanently underdeveloped client state with an entrenched socialist power structure.

Why the U.N. has money is because the U.S. supports it.  If the U.N. is going to be propping up socialist hellhole regimes that should have been overthrown long ago, it raises questions as to what the U.N. is really about and why Americans should continue to support this operation.  President Trump has a negative view of the place, and has downgraded its importance to America by dropping the U.N. ambassador position as a Cabinet post.  If the U.N. is going to be propping up Maduro, maybe he should defund it altogether and just pull the U.S. out.

On second thought, maybe taking the aid wasn't such a bad idea after all.

Such is the thinking of Venezuelan dictator Nicolás Maduro, who seems to be reaching out to the United Nations for aid in the wake of the hideous socialist failure of the Venezuelan economy.

According to the Washington Post:

CARACAS, Venezuela – Venezuela may have reached a tipping point.

The country, of course, is still a mess, with almost 12 percent of the population malnourished and infectious diseases spreading rapidly, according to UNICEF.  Making matters worse, an independent national survey of 40 hospitals found that a third of beds aren't operative, half of emergency rooms do not have vital medicines, and 95 percent of CT scans and 51 percent of X-ray machines aren't working.

So why the celebration among some Venezuela watchers?  It's because the government of President Nicolás Maduro has essentially admitted the depths of the humanitarian crisis in his country and agreed to accept some financial help – albeit a modest amount.

Not exactly an advertisement as to the glories of socialism.

What it shows is that socialism is no road to self-sufficiency – it actually makes a country permanently dependent on the international bureaucracies – the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the Hague courts, the World Bank, joining the welfare class of nations that aren't really nations without the aid, and putting them in a position of always looking for a handout, not primarily to feed the people, but to prop the regime – and its way of governing – up.

Studies show that becoming one of those nations that's always looking to the U.N. for help is a great route to permanent underdevelopment.  Why?  Actual nations are nations because they can hold themselves up, pay their way, live like adults instead of children.  Anything else, and they end up as wards of some empire.  In this case, Maduro is choosing the U.N.

That reveals a lot about where Venezuela is heading – its pattern downstream and off the falls is exactly that of other socialist regimes, starting with its mentor-state, Cuba.

A socialist always looks to another socialist, a bigger socialist, to bail him out, because socialism is inherently unsustainable.  Castro did it, using the Soviet Union when his hellhole went bust, and then Venezuela until the money ran out.  Vietnam, Laos, Mongolia, Ethiopia, Allende's Chile – they've all been Soviet client states living on handouts.  Someone supports North Korea.  Surprise: It's communist China.

Note that Maduro refuses to take any of our money to help, as President Trump generously offered.  No, he wants only U.N. money – and International Monetary Fund money.  He's a beggar who's going to be a chooser.

With Hugo Chávez cheerleader Michelle Bachelet now running the U.N. agency Maduro is seeking help from, one can expect that this will be a crony-cozy relationship.  Bachelet is a Chilean lefty strongly connected to Allende's Chile and an ex-president of Chile who left power on sour terms, as well as a big fan of the United Nations with all its money and power.  Now she's got a new gig there and is one of the officials who's going to be propping up the Venezuelan hellhole regime with U.N. money, ensuring his permanent state of power.

Get a load of the adoration from this photo of the two in Costa Rica three years ago.  It's love...


Maduro and Bachelet in 2015.  Source: Gobierno de Chile, CC BY-SA 2.0.

That looks like the next stage of the game in Venezuela's long socialist slide downward – becoming a permanently underdeveloped client state with an entrenched socialist power structure.

Why the U.N. has money is because the U.S. supports it.  If the U.N. is going to be propping up socialist hellhole regimes that should have been overthrown long ago, it raises questions as to what the U.N. is really about and why Americans should continue to support this operation.  President Trump has a negative view of the place, and has downgraded its importance to America by dropping the U.N. ambassador position as a Cabinet post.  If the U.N. is going to be propping up Maduro, maybe he should defund it altogether and just pull the U.S. out.