Black college student arrested for fake hate crime

For some reason, students at Goucher College in Towson, Maryland are drawing a perverse conclusion from the arrest of a black student there for faking a hate crime with racist graffiti.  The U.K. Daily Mail reports:

Fynn Ajani Arthur, a 21-year-old from Brunswick, Maine, was charged with two counts of malicious destruction of property on Thursday night in Baltimore County.  

His arrest came after graffiti aimed at black and Latino students was found on the second floor of a campus dorm[.] ...

Thursday's graffiti depicted swastikas, the letters 'KKK' and appeared to include the last names of four black students, including Arthur.

Arthur allegedly threatened himself.

The status of victim is now so highly prized that people are willing to commit crimes to portray themselves as victims along racial and ethnic lines, faking the hate because there isn't enough of it to supply the need among wannabe victims.

But instead of drawing the optimistic conclusion that hate is in short supply, relative to the demand for victim status, the Daily Mail reports:

[M]any minority students have expressed ongoing concerns despite Arthur's arrest.  

Senior Cydnii Jones told the Sun the graffiti incidents were merely symptoms of Groucher's [sic] larger issue of racism on campus.

Some black students recently started a buddy system for walking in pairs around campus at night. 

Goucher's black student union group Umoja also designated a common area on campus for students to gather, debrief and vent.

A number of students flocked to the space on Friday afternoon to sign a list of seven demands.  

The demands included the hiring of more black staff on campus, the installation of security cameras in residence halls and the requirement that incoming students take a class on cultural competency. 

'We had to mobilize when we were just trying to get an education,' Jones said.  'It's just really disappointing and draining.'

Jones said the list itself – which was recycled from a similar one in 2014 – serves as evidence that race tensions on campus have persisted.  

'My concern is [officials] will be like: "We got him, we've solved all your problems,"' Jones said. 'But this is just the tip of the iceberg.'

This alleged fake hate crime became the 344th on the list compiled by fakehatecrimesorg.  It has already lost its place on the top of that list: in mid-November, a Drake University student told school officials she had received four racist notes.

There's just not enough hate to go around.  If that strikes you as a crisis, you are the problem.  Perhaps a little reflection on the evident need to feel persecuted is in order.

For some reason, students at Goucher College in Towson, Maryland are drawing a perverse conclusion from the arrest of a black student there for faking a hate crime with racist graffiti.  The U.K. Daily Mail reports:

Fynn Ajani Arthur, a 21-year-old from Brunswick, Maine, was charged with two counts of malicious destruction of property on Thursday night in Baltimore County.  

His arrest came after graffiti aimed at black and Latino students was found on the second floor of a campus dorm[.] ...

Thursday's graffiti depicted swastikas, the letters 'KKK' and appeared to include the last names of four black students, including Arthur.

Arthur allegedly threatened himself.

The status of victim is now so highly prized that people are willing to commit crimes to portray themselves as victims along racial and ethnic lines, faking the hate because there isn't enough of it to supply the need among wannabe victims.

But instead of drawing the optimistic conclusion that hate is in short supply, relative to the demand for victim status, the Daily Mail reports:

[M]any minority students have expressed ongoing concerns despite Arthur's arrest.  

Senior Cydnii Jones told the Sun the graffiti incidents were merely symptoms of Groucher's [sic] larger issue of racism on campus.

Some black students recently started a buddy system for walking in pairs around campus at night. 

Goucher's black student union group Umoja also designated a common area on campus for students to gather, debrief and vent.

A number of students flocked to the space on Friday afternoon to sign a list of seven demands.  

The demands included the hiring of more black staff on campus, the installation of security cameras in residence halls and the requirement that incoming students take a class on cultural competency. 

'We had to mobilize when we were just trying to get an education,' Jones said.  'It's just really disappointing and draining.'

Jones said the list itself – which was recycled from a similar one in 2014 – serves as evidence that race tensions on campus have persisted.  

'My concern is [officials] will be like: "We got him, we've solved all your problems,"' Jones said. 'But this is just the tip of the iceberg.'

This alleged fake hate crime became the 344th on the list compiled by fakehatecrimesorg.  It has already lost its place on the top of that list: in mid-November, a Drake University student told school officials she had received four racist notes.

There's just not enough hate to go around.  If that strikes you as a crisis, you are the problem.  Perhaps a little reflection on the evident need to feel persecuted is in order.