Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez convinced her election was like the Moon landing

Not knowing much about the Moon landing, other than it was sorta big, newly minted House Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has compared her own election to the House of Representatives to the 1969 Moon landing.  According to the Washington Times:

"We've done what we thought was impossible.  We went to the moon," she added.  "We electrified the nation.  We established civil rights.  We enfranchised the country.  We dug deep and we did it.  We did it when no one else thought that we could.  That's what we did when so many of us won an election this year.  That's what so many of us did."

One, two, many Moon landings, to paraphrase her fellow socialists in China.  Um, lady, you won an election.

Instapundit's Sara Hoyt had the funniest retort for the gaffe-prone socialist:

And the green eyeshade guys at the Washington Examiner have the best dissectional analysis, with Philip Wegmann writing:

The three astronauts of Apollo 11 escaped orbit only with the help of an army of engineers and scientist and technicians supporting them from terra firma.  The cosmic achievement belongs as much to the astronauts as it does to the seamstress who fabricated the space suits, to the telescope crews who tracked the lunar module on its voyage, to the human calculators who did the math by hand.  Author Catherine Thimmesh estimates that the great leap for mankind took 400,000 people working around the clock, to say nothing of the more than 530 million worldwide who watched and prayed.

On the other hand, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won an upset election.  It took a lazy incumbent who wouldn't campaign and something like two-dozen staffers with clipboards.

Wegmann makes the additional important point that Ocasio-Cortez's victory wasn't all that great shakes when one recognizes that she comes from what's known as a "rotten borough," one of those districts where very few residents can vote, often because there are large numbers of non-citizens or, worse still, illegals.  California is loaded with such places, and apparently, so was Ocasio-Cortez's district in New York.  She won with fewer cast votes than most other congresspeople, each of whom average about 350,000, and was one of only 19 congresspeople whose vote tallies didn't break 200,000.  Not exactly a stellar accomplishment, let alone a moonshot.

What we are seeing here is not just an excess of enthusiasm (Ocasio-Cortez is, after all, just 29), which isn't always awful, but an excess of egotism, which is.  What's more, if Ocasio-Cortez really does think she's going to institute socialism firsthand in the U.S. and thinks it's going to be as great and systematic and organized as the Moon landing, it also suggests a singular naïveté, a belief that she has unlimited power and the socialist will to get things done.  Reality is going to dawn on her eventually as her two-year term progresses.  With the Democratic Party in disarray, such talk and the mind behind it suggests a lot of potential for mischief in the meantime.

Image credit: Caricature by Donkey Hotey via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0.

Not knowing much about the Moon landing, other than it was sorta big, newly minted House Democrat Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez has compared her own election to the House of Representatives to the 1969 Moon landing.  According to the Washington Times:

"We've done what we thought was impossible.  We went to the moon," she added.  "We electrified the nation.  We established civil rights.  We enfranchised the country.  We dug deep and we did it.  We did it when no one else thought that we could.  That's what we did when so many of us won an election this year.  That's what so many of us did."

One, two, many Moon landings, to paraphrase her fellow socialists in China.  Um, lady, you won an election.

Instapundit's Sara Hoyt had the funniest retort for the gaffe-prone socialist:

And the green eyeshade guys at the Washington Examiner have the best dissectional analysis, with Philip Wegmann writing:

The three astronauts of Apollo 11 escaped orbit only with the help of an army of engineers and scientist and technicians supporting them from terra firma.  The cosmic achievement belongs as much to the astronauts as it does to the seamstress who fabricated the space suits, to the telescope crews who tracked the lunar module on its voyage, to the human calculators who did the math by hand.  Author Catherine Thimmesh estimates that the great leap for mankind took 400,000 people working around the clock, to say nothing of the more than 530 million worldwide who watched and prayed.

On the other hand, Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez won an upset election.  It took a lazy incumbent who wouldn't campaign and something like two-dozen staffers with clipboards.

Wegmann makes the additional important point that Ocasio-Cortez's victory wasn't all that great shakes when one recognizes that she comes from what's known as a "rotten borough," one of those districts where very few residents can vote, often because there are large numbers of non-citizens or, worse still, illegals.  California is loaded with such places, and apparently, so was Ocasio-Cortez's district in New York.  She won with fewer cast votes than most other congresspeople, each of whom average about 350,000, and was one of only 19 congresspeople whose vote tallies didn't break 200,000.  Not exactly a stellar accomplishment, let alone a moonshot.

What we are seeing here is not just an excess of enthusiasm (Ocasio-Cortez is, after all, just 29), which isn't always awful, but an excess of egotism, which is.  What's more, if Ocasio-Cortez really does think she's going to institute socialism firsthand in the U.S. and thinks it's going to be as great and systematic and organized as the Moon landing, it also suggests a singular naïveté, a belief that she has unlimited power and the socialist will to get things done.  Reality is going to dawn on her eventually as her two-year term progresses.  With the Democratic Party in disarray, such talk and the mind behind it suggests a lot of potential for mischief in the meantime.

Image credit: Caricature by Donkey Hotey via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0.