Sessions, the left, and hypocrisy

In the end, Trump had them marching for a man they hate.

The scuttlebutt currently in Washington, D.C., is that Robert Mueller is drafting his final report, wrapping up his nearly two-year-long probe. There’s no timetable for its release, but, presumably, once it’s out, we’ll find out how suburban soccer moms in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, were tricked into voting Trump by hypnotic Facebook ads planted by shtetl-dwelling trolls.

Before all that, Mueller has to survive a change of leadership. Just after the midterm elections when Democrats took back the House of Representatives, President Trump insisted on and received the resignation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The move, which came in the President’s patented news-dropping form of a tweet, was hardly surprising. Congressional Republicans hinted that Trump would force Sessions out following the elections. What was unexpected was Democrats’ reaction to the firing of the nation’s top lawman.

Just hours after his dismissal, liberals, fearing that the Mueller probe was now in danger, marched on Union Square in New York City to voice their disagreement with Sessions’ firing. The protesters’ sign bore the cant synonymous with liberal sloganeering: “Hands off Mueller,” “Repeal, Replace Trump,” “This is what democracy looks like.”

The next day, protests took place nationwide in deep-blue metropolises like Seattle and Boston. Many were organized by MoveOn.org, the liberal advocacy site founded to protect Bill Clinton after he lied under oath. Integrity under the law, it would seem, is only a Republican matter.

The rallies were a sight to behold: thousands of middle-to-upper-class white liberals gathered in de facto support of Sessions, a man whom they spent the better part of two years impugning.

Congressional Democrats weren’t immune to cognitive dissonance. Likely speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi called Sessions’ ousting a “blatant attempt” of Trump’s to undermine Mueller. Just last year, Pelosi designated Sessions “not fit to serve as the top law enforcement officer of our country and must resign.”

Presumed 2020 presidential candidate and Native American impersonator Elizabeth Warren criticized Sessions’ firing despite also once demanding his resignation. “Sessions cannot continue to serve. He should resign,” she tweeted last year. Now she’s treating Trump’s granting of her wish like a smallpox blanket.

If elected Democrats or their picketing toadies had any semblance of principle, they’d be cheering Sessions departure. The long-time Alabama senator was brutal on issues close to liberals’ hearts: unapologetically prosecuting illegal drug use; vigorously enforced immigration law; increasing deportations; separating and interning families illegally crossing the southern border; ending an Obama-era proscription on selling military weaponry to local police; putting financial pressure on so-dubbed sanctuary cities where localized law enforcement refuses to cooperate with federal immigration officials.

Sessions was a stickler for the rule of law. His philosophy was simple and inelegant: What’s written is enforced -- no exceptions, no loopholes, no penumbras. Ann Coulter has argued quite convincingly that Sessions was “the one member of Trump’s Cabinet making good on his campaign’s immigration promises.”

We don’t yet know how Sessions’ acting replacement, Matthew Whitaker, will be as the nation’s number-one law enforcer. Will he act on his previous criticism of the Mueller probe and protect the President from the special counsel’s overreach? Will he be a hardliner on law enforcement, or take a more arbitrary approach? Will his recess appointment even stand up to a constitutional challenge?

None of these questions matter to liberals, who have dropped years’ worth of grievances to find yet another reason to whinge about Trump. Theirs was never a principled objection. It was just another means to weaken a president they didn’t elect in order to secure power for themselves.

Our current politics increasingly and regrettably resembles powermongering over honest disagreement on the common good. The crocodile tears over Sessions’ firing are just another example of liberals stomping on sincerity to score political points.

“The most significant lesson of the Trump era in American politics is that no one actually cares about so-called ‘norms’ or ethics or hoary phrases like ‘separation of powers,’ observes Matthew Walther. Democrats have adopted this nihilism without a hint of self-awareness. This doesn’t bode well for the country should they take back even more control of the federal governmental apparatus.

In the end, Trump had them marching for a man they hate.

The scuttlebutt currently in Washington, D.C., is that Robert Mueller is drafting his final report, wrapping up his nearly two-year-long probe. There’s no timetable for its release, but, presumably, once it’s out, we’ll find out how suburban soccer moms in Winnebago County, Wisconsin, were tricked into voting Trump by hypnotic Facebook ads planted by shtetl-dwelling trolls.

Before all that, Mueller has to survive a change of leadership. Just after the midterm elections when Democrats took back the House of Representatives, President Trump insisted on and received the resignation of Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

The move, which came in the President’s patented news-dropping form of a tweet, was hardly surprising. Congressional Republicans hinted that Trump would force Sessions out following the elections. What was unexpected was Democrats’ reaction to the firing of the nation’s top lawman.

Just hours after his dismissal, liberals, fearing that the Mueller probe was now in danger, marched on Union Square in New York City to voice their disagreement with Sessions’ firing. The protesters’ sign bore the cant synonymous with liberal sloganeering: “Hands off Mueller,” “Repeal, Replace Trump,” “This is what democracy looks like.”

The next day, protests took place nationwide in deep-blue metropolises like Seattle and Boston. Many were organized by MoveOn.org, the liberal advocacy site founded to protect Bill Clinton after he lied under oath. Integrity under the law, it would seem, is only a Republican matter.

The rallies were a sight to behold: thousands of middle-to-upper-class white liberals gathered in de facto support of Sessions, a man whom they spent the better part of two years impugning.

Congressional Democrats weren’t immune to cognitive dissonance. Likely speaker of the House Nancy Pelosi called Sessions’ ousting a “blatant attempt” of Trump’s to undermine Mueller. Just last year, Pelosi designated Sessions “not fit to serve as the top law enforcement officer of our country and must resign.”

Presumed 2020 presidential candidate and Native American impersonator Elizabeth Warren criticized Sessions’ firing despite also once demanding his resignation. “Sessions cannot continue to serve. He should resign,” she tweeted last year. Now she’s treating Trump’s granting of her wish like a smallpox blanket.

If elected Democrats or their picketing toadies had any semblance of principle, they’d be cheering Sessions departure. The long-time Alabama senator was brutal on issues close to liberals’ hearts: unapologetically prosecuting illegal drug use; vigorously enforced immigration law; increasing deportations; separating and interning families illegally crossing the southern border; ending an Obama-era proscription on selling military weaponry to local police; putting financial pressure on so-dubbed sanctuary cities where localized law enforcement refuses to cooperate with federal immigration officials.

Sessions was a stickler for the rule of law. His philosophy was simple and inelegant: What’s written is enforced -- no exceptions, no loopholes, no penumbras. Ann Coulter has argued quite convincingly that Sessions was “the one member of Trump’s Cabinet making good on his campaign’s immigration promises.”

We don’t yet know how Sessions’ acting replacement, Matthew Whitaker, will be as the nation’s number-one law enforcer. Will he act on his previous criticism of the Mueller probe and protect the President from the special counsel’s overreach? Will he be a hardliner on law enforcement, or take a more arbitrary approach? Will his recess appointment even stand up to a constitutional challenge?

None of these questions matter to liberals, who have dropped years’ worth of grievances to find yet another reason to whinge about Trump. Theirs was never a principled objection. It was just another means to weaken a president they didn’t elect in order to secure power for themselves.

Our current politics increasingly and regrettably resembles powermongering over honest disagreement on the common good. The crocodile tears over Sessions’ firing are just another example of liberals stomping on sincerity to score political points.

“The most significant lesson of the Trump era in American politics is that no one actually cares about so-called ‘norms’ or ethics or hoary phrases like ‘separation of powers,’ observes Matthew Walther. Democrats have adopted this nihilism without a hint of self-awareness. This doesn’t bode well for the country should they take back even more control of the federal governmental apparatus.