Migrant caravan's border-shutting operation amounts to hostage-taking

We've commented a lot on how the leftist organizers of the migrant caravan, such as Pueblo Sin Fronteras are using the migrants themselves as pawns to advance their far-left agenda. They put women and children in front for the cameras, promising them goodies for doing it. They subject them to a very dangerous journey northward, and even send women and children as shock troops to storm the U.S. border, as they did yesterday, so as to make any U.S. response to border-storming appear 'heartless.' It's all part of their propaganda warfare, and if they put women and kids in danger, well, from their perspective, it's just the cost of doing business. They're all expendable.

They're also holding the people of Tijuana hostage, given that so many of the migrants are criminals who have gotten right down to business in committing crimes against Mexicans, and subjecting city authorities to the large costs of housing and feeding them. The Tijuana authorities were caught off guard, handed a bill, and are not happy about it.

But their coerciveness actually extends to non-migrants, because of their willingness to dare President Trump to shut down the border. A closed border means nothing to these leftists, whose agenda is 'by-any-means-necessary,' but it exacts a lot of cost to the normals who live and work in both Tijuana and the U.S., and who go back and forth as a means of conducting their daily lives.

First, an instance I know of: A source at the University of San Diego tells me that there are several fine Mexican students who commute daily to USD from their homes in Tijuana, with their special commuter-visa passes. Everyone loves these bright hard-working kids and the university is delighted to have them there. The migrant caravan's border shutdown holds those kids hostage.

Here's another instance from Sandra Dibble in today's San Diego Union-Tribune:

Enrique Méndez, a high-ranking state government official in Tijuana, has heard complaints from Tijuana doctors that their U.S. patients have been canceling appointments as the U.S. government has stepped up security at the ports of entry, and wait times to return to the San Diego have grown longer.

“I’m getting a lot of comments from people saying, I won’t be able to cross to Tijuana, I have to go live with a family member in San Diego, because I work there,” Méndez said.

Hear that? Those are the refugees from Obamacare, people who get their health care and dental work done in Tijuana. Those people are being held hostage by these caravan jerks.

The more I think about this, the more appalled I get. At the San Diego Zoo, I remember an instance where my uncle, an automobile executive from Grand Rapids, saw a couple of ten year-old Tijuana boys struggling to count their pennies so as to take a ride on those buckets that cross above the zoo and only one could go. He paid for both and their little-kid faces lit up. It was wonderful. Now, no zoo for the kids.

In San Diego's Fashion Valley mall, now that there's Black Friday and the kickoff to the holiday season, the parking spaces are normally loaded with cars with Baja California license plates. Just as interesting, head on down to Rosarito Beach south of Tijuana and see all the California plates on the beach as well. I live in San Diego and love going to Tijuana's beautiful museums when I can, and buying Mexican artwork at certain shops. I've sent visitors to take a gander at the city and have breakfast at Sanborn's. All hostages to the border shutdown.

There's also the macro stuff, the vast cross-border trade that is so important to both countries given that the San Diego-Tijuana border crossing is the most active in the world with some 300,000 crossings daily. Tijuana is a top maker of medical devices, oil drilling equipment, headphones, consumer electronics, and green technology, just to name some stuff off the top of my head. The giant shiny white semi trucks driving up from Tijuana to the mighty warehouses of the inland empire (you can see how big these are by jet as you land at LAX) in California brings these goods across the entire U.S.

According to U.S. data as of 2016, Mexico ships $294 billion in goods to the U.S. and the U.S. ships $231 billion in goods to Mexico. That's a lot of trade to potentially be held hostage based on the agenda of a rabid leftwing group that seeks to challenge the U.S. so it can dance around about open borders and votes for Democrats.

Should these little pukes be allowed to control all of that? It doesn't look like the Mexicans are going to stand for it, given the speed with which they moved to bust and deport yesterday's border stormers.

A closed border hurts both sides and kills off all kinds of connections and encounters between U.S. citizens and Mexicans. The caravan organizers show they are perfectly willing to hold all of us as their hostages to push their crummy agenda. And for that, they should be the ones to get shut down. 

We've commented a lot on how the leftist organizers of the migrant caravan, such as Pueblo Sin Fronteras are using the migrants themselves as pawns to advance their far-left agenda. They put women and children in front for the cameras, promising them goodies for doing it. They subject them to a very dangerous journey northward, and even send women and children as shock troops to storm the U.S. border, as they did yesterday, so as to make any U.S. response to border-storming appear 'heartless.' It's all part of their propaganda warfare, and if they put women and kids in danger, well, from their perspective, it's just the cost of doing business. They're all expendable.

They're also holding the people of Tijuana hostage, given that so many of the migrants are criminals who have gotten right down to business in committing crimes against Mexicans, and subjecting city authorities to the large costs of housing and feeding them. The Tijuana authorities were caught off guard, handed a bill, and are not happy about it.

But their coerciveness actually extends to non-migrants, because of their willingness to dare President Trump to shut down the border. A closed border means nothing to these leftists, whose agenda is 'by-any-means-necessary,' but it exacts a lot of cost to the normals who live and work in both Tijuana and the U.S., and who go back and forth as a means of conducting their daily lives.

First, an instance I know of: A source at the University of San Diego tells me that there are several fine Mexican students who commute daily to USD from their homes in Tijuana, with their special commuter-visa passes. Everyone loves these bright hard-working kids and the university is delighted to have them there. The migrant caravan's border shutdown holds those kids hostage.

Here's another instance from Sandra Dibble in today's San Diego Union-Tribune:

Enrique Méndez, a high-ranking state government official in Tijuana, has heard complaints from Tijuana doctors that their U.S. patients have been canceling appointments as the U.S. government has stepped up security at the ports of entry, and wait times to return to the San Diego have grown longer.

“I’m getting a lot of comments from people saying, I won’t be able to cross to Tijuana, I have to go live with a family member in San Diego, because I work there,” Méndez said.

Hear that? Those are the refugees from Obamacare, people who get their health care and dental work done in Tijuana. Those people are being held hostage by these caravan jerks.

The more I think about this, the more appalled I get. At the San Diego Zoo, I remember an instance where my uncle, an automobile executive from Grand Rapids, saw a couple of ten year-old Tijuana boys struggling to count their pennies so as to take a ride on those buckets that cross above the zoo and only one could go. He paid for both and their little-kid faces lit up. It was wonderful. Now, no zoo for the kids.

In San Diego's Fashion Valley mall, now that there's Black Friday and the kickoff to the holiday season, the parking spaces are normally loaded with cars with Baja California license plates. Just as interesting, head on down to Rosarito Beach south of Tijuana and see all the California plates on the beach as well. I live in San Diego and love going to Tijuana's beautiful museums when I can, and buying Mexican artwork at certain shops. I've sent visitors to take a gander at the city and have breakfast at Sanborn's. All hostages to the border shutdown.

There's also the macro stuff, the vast cross-border trade that is so important to both countries given that the San Diego-Tijuana border crossing is the most active in the world with some 300,000 crossings daily. Tijuana is a top maker of medical devices, oil drilling equipment, headphones, consumer electronics, and green technology, just to name some stuff off the top of my head. The giant shiny white semi trucks driving up from Tijuana to the mighty warehouses of the inland empire (you can see how big these are by jet as you land at LAX) in California brings these goods across the entire U.S.

According to U.S. data as of 2016, Mexico ships $294 billion in goods to the U.S. and the U.S. ships $231 billion in goods to Mexico. That's a lot of trade to potentially be held hostage based on the agenda of a rabid leftwing group that seeks to challenge the U.S. so it can dance around about open borders and votes for Democrats.

Should these little pukes be allowed to control all of that? It doesn't look like the Mexicans are going to stand for it, given the speed with which they moved to bust and deport yesterday's border stormers.

A closed border hurts both sides and kills off all kinds of connections and encounters between U.S. citizens and Mexicans. The caravan organizers show they are perfectly willing to hold all of us as their hostages to push their crummy agenda. And for that, they should be the ones to get shut down.