Tippecanoe and Witchypoo

By and large Democrats believe in nothing.  They booed God at their national convention.  They don’t believe the Constitution obtains any longer, perhaps because it was written by white guys, and we all know how Democrats feel about white guys.  Democrats don’t believe in the Electoral College.  They don’t believe a candidate for the Supreme Court is innocent until proven guilty.  They don’t believe the DNC, Hillary Clinton, and the FBI conspired to spread lies and innuendo before and after the 2016 election.  They don’t believe Venezuela is a mess because of socialism. 

But there is one Democrat running for the West Virginia House of Delegates who holds firm spiritual beliefs and is certain her constituency is not religiously bigoted enough to hold them against her.

Lissa Lucas is a witch. 

But don’t hold it against her.

Writing under the name Llysse Smith Wylle, Lucas has authored two books including one titled The Art of Magic Words.  It is a do-it-yourself guide to casting magic spells.

You are a skeptic.  You demand your local expert at anything be duly credentialed.  How’s this for an impressive Curricula Vitae?

She has been a pagan for many years and Wiccan for almost twenty years.

She is a member of the Third Circle of the Tradition of Universal Eclectic Wicca.

She is teacher and coordinator to the First Circle degree via the Coven of the Far Flung Net.

She has studied Chaos and other magical techniques privately.

She is a member of the Order of the Golden Breath.

I admit to some early misgiving, but that Coven of the Far Flung Net thing really got to me.  By the time I reached the Order of the Golden Breath I was under her spell and hoping she would share some of that with my dog.

Being a sensible witch Lucas has advised against using Wiccan spells for harm without justifiable cause.  She suggests a pinch of caution to would-be witches, writing that “actions that do cause harm should be done with the appropriate respect and restraint.” 

How can anyone argue with that?  You’d have to be the mayor or a masked citizen of Portland, Oregon to mount an attack upon such an innocent statement.

If you find the subject of witches a little uncomfortable, like a very hot oven measured to your exact size and body weight, candidate Lissa Lucas offers comfort.  “Casting a beauty spell on yourself, for example, will usually be seen as a spell that causes no harm,” however “Casting a spell to exact revenge on someone you don’t care for, on the other hand, is generally unacceptable to Wiccans.”

Perhaps Lissa Lucas could try a beauty spell on her own red-eyed and snaggle-toothed Democratic Party; it is in desperate need of a makeover.  It might work, but there is a chance that the fecund ugliness could overwhelm her magical powers and leave her with an obvious mental instability.

Americans have sometimes turned down the opportunity to elect a witch to public office; the 2016 general election would stand as one example of such a rebuff. 

Let’s hope the charm holds on November 6th.

By and large Democrats believe in nothing.  They booed God at their national convention.  They don’t believe the Constitution obtains any longer, perhaps because it was written by white guys, and we all know how Democrats feel about white guys.  Democrats don’t believe in the Electoral College.  They don’t believe a candidate for the Supreme Court is innocent until proven guilty.  They don’t believe the DNC, Hillary Clinton, and the FBI conspired to spread lies and innuendo before and after the 2016 election.  They don’t believe Venezuela is a mess because of socialism. 

But there is one Democrat running for the West Virginia House of Delegates who holds firm spiritual beliefs and is certain her constituency is not religiously bigoted enough to hold them against her.

Lissa Lucas is a witch. 

But don’t hold it against her.

Writing under the name Llysse Smith Wylle, Lucas has authored two books including one titled The Art of Magic Words.  It is a do-it-yourself guide to casting magic spells.

You are a skeptic.  You demand your local expert at anything be duly credentialed.  How’s this for an impressive Curricula Vitae?

She has been a pagan for many years and Wiccan for almost twenty years.

She is a member of the Third Circle of the Tradition of Universal Eclectic Wicca.

She is teacher and coordinator to the First Circle degree via the Coven of the Far Flung Net.

She has studied Chaos and other magical techniques privately.

She is a member of the Order of the Golden Breath.

I admit to some early misgiving, but that Coven of the Far Flung Net thing really got to me.  By the time I reached the Order of the Golden Breath I was under her spell and hoping she would share some of that with my dog.

Being a sensible witch Lucas has advised against using Wiccan spells for harm without justifiable cause.  She suggests a pinch of caution to would-be witches, writing that “actions that do cause harm should be done with the appropriate respect and restraint.” 

How can anyone argue with that?  You’d have to be the mayor or a masked citizen of Portland, Oregon to mount an attack upon such an innocent statement.

If you find the subject of witches a little uncomfortable, like a very hot oven measured to your exact size and body weight, candidate Lissa Lucas offers comfort.  “Casting a beauty spell on yourself, for example, will usually be seen as a spell that causes no harm,” however “Casting a spell to exact revenge on someone you don’t care for, on the other hand, is generally unacceptable to Wiccans.”

Perhaps Lissa Lucas could try a beauty spell on her own red-eyed and snaggle-toothed Democratic Party; it is in desperate need of a makeover.  It might work, but there is a chance that the fecund ugliness could overwhelm her magical powers and leave her with an obvious mental instability.

Americans have sometimes turned down the opportunity to elect a witch to public office; the 2016 general election would stand as one example of such a rebuff. 

Let’s hope the charm holds on November 6th.