Professor called 'racist' for urging a student to 'try harder'

A professor at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art has been singled out by a female student for urging the kid to "try harder" in his class.

The student missed a couple of classes, at which point the professor tried to impress upon the young woman the importance of being present during class. The result was both disturbing and hilarious.

PJ Media:

Only, when a professor insisted that his students show up for class, one student decided it was time to post a manifesto decrying the white professor's racism against her as a "POC" (person of color).

The student posted a letter on a public board at the school that excoriated the professor for trying to help her. It reads, in part:

Geoff Kaplan sent me an email expressing his concern about my attendance. I knew that I was going to be late on the morning of the next class and felt anxious about attending because of the concern that was already present. I was going back and forth about whether I should just be late or if I should miss the class. I really did not want the extra attention and arrived to school with enough time to attend the class but decided not to go, which I understand is irresponsible.

Was she delayed because of a job? Was she hung over? The fact that she understands her missing class was "irresponsible" could be that she had no good reason to miss the class.

He was interrogative throughout the conversation, as though I wasn't telling him what he expected to hear. He opened the conversation with asking me what was wrong. I told him that nothing was wrong... He said, "You're a young woman of color, so you have to try harder than everyone else, which isn't fair, but you know...'"

The poor thing apparently isn't familiar with "dialogue." Asking questions is out of bounds because, well, racism.

Certainly the professor should have known better than to mention race at all:

Hearing him try to explain or mention what he thought my experience was felt unproductive and made me feel like he is holding me to a certain standard based on my identity. I wasn't comfortable with how patronizing the direction of this conversation was going.

The "standard" the teacher was holding her to was that, at an absolute minimum, she must show up for class. Too much?

I spoke to him the next class and confronted him about how uncomfortable he made me. He was extremely egotistic, patronizing, immature, and dismissive. He avoided the topic of racism entirely and focused mostly on my attendance, completely disregarding the purpose of why I initiated the meeting, all the while making snide comments about my attendance.

Yeah, too much to ask.

I'd love to see her try this act when she gets out in the world and has to work for a living. She can tell her boss how racist he is for requiring that she show up for work to get paid. 

I have a feeling this snowflake is going to be spending a lot of time in the unemployment line.

A professor at the Cooper Union for the Advancement of Science and Art has been singled out by a female student for urging the kid to "try harder" in his class.

The student missed a couple of classes, at which point the professor tried to impress upon the young woman the importance of being present during class. The result was both disturbing and hilarious.

PJ Media:

Only, when a professor insisted that his students show up for class, one student decided it was time to post a manifesto decrying the white professor's racism against her as a "POC" (person of color).

The student posted a letter on a public board at the school that excoriated the professor for trying to help her. It reads, in part:

Geoff Kaplan sent me an email expressing his concern about my attendance. I knew that I was going to be late on the morning of the next class and felt anxious about attending because of the concern that was already present. I was going back and forth about whether I should just be late or if I should miss the class. I really did not want the extra attention and arrived to school with enough time to attend the class but decided not to go, which I understand is irresponsible.

Was she delayed because of a job? Was she hung over? The fact that she understands her missing class was "irresponsible" could be that she had no good reason to miss the class.

He was interrogative throughout the conversation, as though I wasn't telling him what he expected to hear. He opened the conversation with asking me what was wrong. I told him that nothing was wrong... He said, "You're a young woman of color, so you have to try harder than everyone else, which isn't fair, but you know...'"

The poor thing apparently isn't familiar with "dialogue." Asking questions is out of bounds because, well, racism.

Certainly the professor should have known better than to mention race at all:

Hearing him try to explain or mention what he thought my experience was felt unproductive and made me feel like he is holding me to a certain standard based on my identity. I wasn't comfortable with how patronizing the direction of this conversation was going.

The "standard" the teacher was holding her to was that, at an absolute minimum, she must show up for class. Too much?

I spoke to him the next class and confronted him about how uncomfortable he made me. He was extremely egotistic, patronizing, immature, and dismissive. He avoided the topic of racism entirely and focused mostly on my attendance, completely disregarding the purpose of why I initiated the meeting, all the while making snide comments about my attendance.

Yeah, too much to ask.

I'd love to see her try this act when she gets out in the world and has to work for a living. She can tell her boss how racist he is for requiring that she show up for work to get paid. 

I have a feeling this snowflake is going to be spending a lot of time in the unemployment line.