Georgia city cuts fines in exchange for registering to vote?

Register to vote, get a $50 discount off your city fines?

A Georgia city is offering its citizens just that, if they register to vote.

A local political site described how this was supposed to go:

A metro Atlanta city offered residents who registered to vote or confirmed their voter status a $50 discount from citations, raising questions about whether the plan violated state law that bans giving money or gifts in exchange for registering voters.

The City of South Fulton advertised the discount ahead of the voter registration deadline, and city solicitor LaDawn Jones said it was an example of the city's "innovative" criminal justice system.

They don't do it as California does, in other words, where the one-party establishment registers you to vote whether you asked for it or not.

They just do it conventional Democrat-style, which is to offer the goodies – which, arguably, according to the mayor of Atlanta, look like bribes.

As if that's the optimal population to incentivize into the voter pool.

The state's interest isn't all that clear, except for the little reference from Jones that she was looking to register voters who rarely vote.

Democrats have launched a broad effort to sign up new voters and encourage others who rarely cast ballots to vote in November.

Does this sound like a Democratic Party operation or what?  Cui bono?

If it's not a naked bid by Democrats to capture the convict vote, what else could it be?  What would the state have to gain by registering people who don't want to register without a $50 voucher in hand?

The report is mixed as to whether the fine discount goes to merely traffic court miscreants or true criminal justice system convicts.  But the picture of Democrats offering a cash incentive suggests but that local ruling Democrats are convinced that their party will benefit from the convict vote.

Register to vote, get a $50 discount off your city fines?

A Georgia city is offering its citizens just that, if they register to vote.

A local political site described how this was supposed to go:

A metro Atlanta city offered residents who registered to vote or confirmed their voter status a $50 discount from citations, raising questions about whether the plan violated state law that bans giving money or gifts in exchange for registering voters.

The City of South Fulton advertised the discount ahead of the voter registration deadline, and city solicitor LaDawn Jones said it was an example of the city's "innovative" criminal justice system.

They don't do it as California does, in other words, where the one-party establishment registers you to vote whether you asked for it or not.

They just do it conventional Democrat-style, which is to offer the goodies – which, arguably, according to the mayor of Atlanta, look like bribes.

As if that's the optimal population to incentivize into the voter pool.

The state's interest isn't all that clear, except for the little reference from Jones that she was looking to register voters who rarely vote.

Democrats have launched a broad effort to sign up new voters and encourage others who rarely cast ballots to vote in November.

Does this sound like a Democratic Party operation or what?  Cui bono?

If it's not a naked bid by Democrats to capture the convict vote, what else could it be?  What would the state have to gain by registering people who don't want to register without a $50 voucher in hand?

The report is mixed as to whether the fine discount goes to merely traffic court miscreants or true criminal justice system convicts.  But the picture of Democrats offering a cash incentive suggests but that local ruling Democrats are convinced that their party will benefit from the convict vote.