Crowdfunding campaign has raised $1 million for Christine Blasey Ford

Brett Kavanaugh's main accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, has raised nearly $1 million from two GoFundMe accounts, and she's asking for more, according to an article by RealClearInvestigations.

Ford is also fielding offers for a book deal.  All of this despite Democrats making a big deal during the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings that she had "nothing to gain" from coming forward.

"You had absolutely nothing to gain by bringing these facts to the Senate Judiciary Committee," Sen. Dick Durbin said during her testimony last month.  This sentiment was echoed by other Democrats, who presented it as evidence that Ford was telling the truth.  "I want to thank you," added California Sen. Kamala Harris, "because you clearly have nothing to gain for what you have done."

In fact, Ford stands to gain some $1 million and counting from national crowdfunding campaigns launched by friends and other supporters, while she is said to be fielding book offers.

The potential seven-figure windfall, which she says she intends to cash in on – while still asking donors for more money – has some questioning her motivation for accusing the conservative judge after 35 years of silence, and whether it goes beyond personal or even political justice.  Others worry the largesse sets a dangerous precedent: Crowdfunding, which unlike political donations is unregulated, could be routinely used in the future as a bounty for providing political dirt on opponents.

Two GoFundMe accounts have raised more than $842,000 for Ford, and the money is still coming in weeks after she testified and left the spotlight.  The total does not include a third account collecting $120,000 for an academic endowment in her name.

"The costs for security, housing, transportation and other related expenses are much higher than we anticipated and they do not show signs of letting up," Ford said in a recent statement posted on the GoFundMe page of the "Help Christine Blasey Ford" campaign, which is still bringing in donations.  "Funds received via this account will be used to help us pay for these mounting expenses."

GoFundMe spokeswoman Katherine Cichy told RealClearInvestigations that Ford and her husband can withdraw as much as they want whenever they want for any purpose.  Payments would be electronically deposited into the Fords' bank account within two to five business days of initiating withdrawals.

There is no doubt that Ford went through an ordeal.  Regardless of whether you think she's lying or imagining things or exaggerating what happened, the truth is, it cost her dearly.  Would you like to get death threats and be pilloried online?  If you do, I have a friend named Marquis de Sade who would love to meet you.

That said, she would have been a hero if she promised to use the funds only for her security and expenses during the hearings while giving the rest to #MeToo and other women's groups.  What will she do with proceeds from the book deal?

In a few months, she will become a footnote to history.  She will return to anonymity – a forgotten relic of the culture wars.  Will she be like Cindy Sheehan, the woman who camped out in front of President Bush's home in 2005 to ask why her son had to die in Iraq?  She became a liberal celebrity and then tried to hang on to her notoriety by appearing at antiwar events and other demonstrations until people started asking "Cindy who?"  Finally, she slipped back into her old life – a pathetic figure.

Ford, too, will be a forgotten heroine.  But at least she'll be rich.

Brett Kavanaugh's main accuser, Christine Blasey Ford, has raised nearly $1 million from two GoFundMe accounts, and she's asking for more, according to an article by RealClearInvestigations.

Ford is also fielding offers for a book deal.  All of this despite Democrats making a big deal during the Kavanaugh confirmation hearings that she had "nothing to gain" from coming forward.

"You had absolutely nothing to gain by bringing these facts to the Senate Judiciary Committee," Sen. Dick Durbin said during her testimony last month.  This sentiment was echoed by other Democrats, who presented it as evidence that Ford was telling the truth.  "I want to thank you," added California Sen. Kamala Harris, "because you clearly have nothing to gain for what you have done."

In fact, Ford stands to gain some $1 million and counting from national crowdfunding campaigns launched by friends and other supporters, while she is said to be fielding book offers.

The potential seven-figure windfall, which she says she intends to cash in on – while still asking donors for more money – has some questioning her motivation for accusing the conservative judge after 35 years of silence, and whether it goes beyond personal or even political justice.  Others worry the largesse sets a dangerous precedent: Crowdfunding, which unlike political donations is unregulated, could be routinely used in the future as a bounty for providing political dirt on opponents.

Two GoFundMe accounts have raised more than $842,000 for Ford, and the money is still coming in weeks after she testified and left the spotlight.  The total does not include a third account collecting $120,000 for an academic endowment in her name.

"The costs for security, housing, transportation and other related expenses are much higher than we anticipated and they do not show signs of letting up," Ford said in a recent statement posted on the GoFundMe page of the "Help Christine Blasey Ford" campaign, which is still bringing in donations.  "Funds received via this account will be used to help us pay for these mounting expenses."

GoFundMe spokeswoman Katherine Cichy told RealClearInvestigations that Ford and her husband can withdraw as much as they want whenever they want for any purpose.  Payments would be electronically deposited into the Fords' bank account within two to five business days of initiating withdrawals.

There is no doubt that Ford went through an ordeal.  Regardless of whether you think she's lying or imagining things or exaggerating what happened, the truth is, it cost her dearly.  Would you like to get death threats and be pilloried online?  If you do, I have a friend named Marquis de Sade who would love to meet you.

That said, she would have been a hero if she promised to use the funds only for her security and expenses during the hearings while giving the rest to #MeToo and other women's groups.  What will she do with proceeds from the book deal?

In a few months, she will become a footnote to history.  She will return to anonymity – a forgotten relic of the culture wars.  Will she be like Cindy Sheehan, the woman who camped out in front of President Bush's home in 2005 to ask why her son had to die in Iraq?  She became a liberal celebrity and then tried to hang on to her notoriety by appearing at antiwar events and other demonstrations until people started asking "Cindy who?"  Finally, she slipped back into her old life – a pathetic figure.

Ford, too, will be a forgotten heroine.  But at least she'll be rich.