Andrew McCabe, the Deep State henchman

The process by which the FBI and Department of Justice were corrupted into serving as political attack machines for the Democrats is finally coming into focus.  In an article in The Hill that is today's read of the day, a retired senior FBI executive puts together the evidence already on the record to offer a roadmap of how the politicization of these powerful bureaucracies was accomplished.

Kevin R. Brock, who is identified as "former assistant director of intelligence for the FBI, was an FBI special agent for 24 years and principal deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)," sees Andrew McCabe as the point man, pulled up through the career bureaucracy of the bureau by his mentor, James Comey, who was, after all, an outsider political appointee in need of a henchman to implement his political machinations.  Once Comey was fired, McCabe became the key figure leading the law enforcement branch of the Deep State's resistance to Trump.


Cropped from Fox News via YouTube.

This is an article that deserves to be read in full, but here are a couple of tidbits to entice you, demonstrating the wit and experience that Brock brings to the subject.

According to FBI executives, Comey personally fast-tracked McCabe's career into the deputy director position.  McCabe was not happy that the president fired his boss and that Rosenstein provided the ammo.    

Comey, who has urged America to vote Democrat, apparently liked what he saw in McCabe, who was overseeing the Clinton email investigation in the Washington Field Office, even though his wife, a Democratic candidate for Virginia Senate, had accepted over $1 million bundled together by longtime Clinton loyalist Terry McAuliffe for her campaign just two weeks prior to the 2015 election that she lost.

McCabe apparently couldn't imagine why anyone might see a possible conflict and so did not recuse himself from the Clinton and other politically fraught investigations.  Instead, he doubled down with unprecedented actions.  Once installed as deputy director, he pulled the Clinton email investigation out of the field office and directly into his office, using headquarters execs such as former agent Peter Strzok to aggressively wind down the investigation.  He then personally opened three other politically-charged FBI investigations.  (For the record, FBI deputy directors don't open cases and run them out of their offices.  The Department of Justice [DOJ] inspector general since has criticized McCabe for actions "inconsistent with typical investigative strategy.")

And:

The second case personally initiated by McCabe, according to an ABC News report last March, was a criminal investigation against Attorney General Jeff Sessions for lack of candor in congressional testimony about his interactions with Russians.  McCabe opened the case based on the opinions of two Democratic senators.  If true, this is highly shaky predication to unleash an FBI investigation.  Even the least experienced squad supervisor in the field wouldn't try it.  

Ironically, and predictably, the case appears to have gone nowhere and, a year later, Sessions himself fired McCabe for his own lack of candor under oath – known outside the Beltway as "lying."

There remain some points yet to be clarified, but this article is the best roadmap yet that I have seen.

Hat tip: Mark Wauck

The process by which the FBI and Department of Justice were corrupted into serving as political attack machines for the Democrats is finally coming into focus.  In an article in The Hill that is today's read of the day, a retired senior FBI executive puts together the evidence already on the record to offer a roadmap of how the politicization of these powerful bureaucracies was accomplished.

Kevin R. Brock, who is identified as "former assistant director of intelligence for the FBI, was an FBI special agent for 24 years and principal deputy director of the National Counterterrorism Center (NCTC)," sees Andrew McCabe as the point man, pulled up through the career bureaucracy of the bureau by his mentor, James Comey, who was, after all, an outsider political appointee in need of a henchman to implement his political machinations.  Once Comey was fired, McCabe became the key figure leading the law enforcement branch of the Deep State's resistance to Trump.


Cropped from Fox News via YouTube.

This is an article that deserves to be read in full, but here are a couple of tidbits to entice you, demonstrating the wit and experience that Brock brings to the subject.

According to FBI executives, Comey personally fast-tracked McCabe's career into the deputy director position.  McCabe was not happy that the president fired his boss and that Rosenstein provided the ammo.    

Comey, who has urged America to vote Democrat, apparently liked what he saw in McCabe, who was overseeing the Clinton email investigation in the Washington Field Office, even though his wife, a Democratic candidate for Virginia Senate, had accepted over $1 million bundled together by longtime Clinton loyalist Terry McAuliffe for her campaign just two weeks prior to the 2015 election that she lost.

McCabe apparently couldn't imagine why anyone might see a possible conflict and so did not recuse himself from the Clinton and other politically fraught investigations.  Instead, he doubled down with unprecedented actions.  Once installed as deputy director, he pulled the Clinton email investigation out of the field office and directly into his office, using headquarters execs such as former agent Peter Strzok to aggressively wind down the investigation.  He then personally opened three other politically-charged FBI investigations.  (For the record, FBI deputy directors don't open cases and run them out of their offices.  The Department of Justice [DOJ] inspector general since has criticized McCabe for actions "inconsistent with typical investigative strategy.")

And:

The second case personally initiated by McCabe, according to an ABC News report last March, was a criminal investigation against Attorney General Jeff Sessions for lack of candor in congressional testimony about his interactions with Russians.  McCabe opened the case based on the opinions of two Democratic senators.  If true, this is highly shaky predication to unleash an FBI investigation.  Even the least experienced squad supervisor in the field wouldn't try it.  

Ironically, and predictably, the case appears to have gone nowhere and, a year later, Sessions himself fired McCabe for his own lack of candor under oath – known outside the Beltway as "lying."

There remain some points yet to be clarified, but this article is the best roadmap yet that I have seen.

Hat tip: Mark Wauck