London mayor calls for second Brexit vote

London Mayor Sadiq Khan is calling for a second referendum on whether Great Britain should leave the European Union.  Khan claims that Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit policies have become "mired in confusion and deadlock" and could damage the country.

Euronews:

However, with time running out for London and Brussels to thrash out a Brexit deal, the British government is preparing plans for a no-deal Brexit.

Chancellor Philip Hammond told senior ministers last week that Brexit could have to be delayed beyond March 29 in order to pass new laws, The Sun newspaper said on Saturday.

The idea was immediately rejected by May, the report said.

Khan, a senior member of the Labour Party, said Britain was now facing either a bad deal or a no-deal Brexit, both of which were "incredibly risky" for Britain.

Writing in Sunday's Observer newspaper, Khan blamed the government's handling of the negotiations and said the threat to living standards, the economy, and jobs was too great for voters not to have a say.

"The government's abject failure – and the huge risk we face of a bad deal or a no-deal Brexit – means that giving people a fresh say is now the right – and only – approach left for our country," he said.

Khan's support for a second referendum, which supporters call a "people's vote", will put more pressure on Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn to change his opposition to the idea.

The "people's vote" already happened.  That pro-E.U. forces lost it fair and square is apparently irrelevant.  Khan wants the people to keep voting again and again if necessary, until they get it "right."

The first vote in June 2016 came as a shock to pro-E.U. forces.  They had no clue that the depth of feeling against the E.U. ran as deep as it did in Great Britain.  Their overconfidence led to a defeat.  They will not make that same mistake again.

So far, even most Labor politicians are opposing a second Brexit vote, realizing that the backlash will cost them dearly at the polls if May's government falls.  That prospect is not as far-fetched as it might have been at the beginning of the year as conservative members of Parliament are getting more and more frustrated with May's Brexit strategy. 

May's government is torn between the "soft" and "hard" Brexit.  This is reflected in May's approach to negotiations with Brussels.  The E.U. government is perfectly content to draw out the process, hoping Khan and other pro-E.U. politicians will get their way and a second vote will be staged.  And this time, the left would pull out all the stops to win.

London Mayor Sadiq Khan is calling for a second referendum on whether Great Britain should leave the European Union.  Khan claims that Prime Minister Theresa May's Brexit policies have become "mired in confusion and deadlock" and could damage the country.

Euronews:

However, with time running out for London and Brussels to thrash out a Brexit deal, the British government is preparing plans for a no-deal Brexit.

Chancellor Philip Hammond told senior ministers last week that Brexit could have to be delayed beyond March 29 in order to pass new laws, The Sun newspaper said on Saturday.

The idea was immediately rejected by May, the report said.

Khan, a senior member of the Labour Party, said Britain was now facing either a bad deal or a no-deal Brexit, both of which were "incredibly risky" for Britain.

Writing in Sunday's Observer newspaper, Khan blamed the government's handling of the negotiations and said the threat to living standards, the economy, and jobs was too great for voters not to have a say.

"The government's abject failure – and the huge risk we face of a bad deal or a no-deal Brexit – means that giving people a fresh say is now the right – and only – approach left for our country," he said.

Khan's support for a second referendum, which supporters call a "people's vote", will put more pressure on Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn to change his opposition to the idea.

The "people's vote" already happened.  That pro-E.U. forces lost it fair and square is apparently irrelevant.  Khan wants the people to keep voting again and again if necessary, until they get it "right."

The first vote in June 2016 came as a shock to pro-E.U. forces.  They had no clue that the depth of feeling against the E.U. ran as deep as it did in Great Britain.  Their overconfidence led to a defeat.  They will not make that same mistake again.

So far, even most Labor politicians are opposing a second Brexit vote, realizing that the backlash will cost them dearly at the polls if May's government falls.  That prospect is not as far-fetched as it might have been at the beginning of the year as conservative members of Parliament are getting more and more frustrated with May's Brexit strategy. 

May's government is torn between the "soft" and "hard" Brexit.  This is reflected in May's approach to negotiations with Brussels.  The E.U. government is perfectly content to draw out the process, hoping Khan and other pro-E.U. politicians will get their way and a second vote will be staged.  And this time, the left would pull out all the stops to win.