Co-founder of 'March for Our Lives' explains why he left the movement

Cameron Kasky, co-founder of the anti-gun youth group March for Our Lives, made an appearance on Fox radio and was interviewed by Guy Benson and Marie Harf.  Kasky had some shocking things to say about his experience with the group and why he left it.

Kasky confronted Marco Rubio at a town hall, saying some pretty harsh things to the senator.  He has since re-examined his actions and what he believed at that time.

But, looking back on that it's like you said, you touched off on this very well in the intro, I'm not going to kick myself for it because I'm 17.  Despite the fact that I thought I did at the time, I don't know everything.  But, I look back on that and I say, you know what, there were people who had just been buried and when you're looking at somebody that you find might in some way have been complicit in this murderer obtaining the weapon it's hard not to say something like that.  But, I went into that wanting less conversation and more to embarrass Rubio and that was my biggest flaw. 

Touring with March for Our Lives opened Kasky's eyes – and mind – to new ideas.

On his plans going forward: This summer when March For Our Lives went on the summer tour that we embarked on I met that person in Texas whose [sic] got that semi-automatic weapon because that's how they like to protect their family.  I met the 50 some odd percent of woman [sic] who are pro-life, even though I thought it was preposterous that a woman could be pro-life and not pro-choice at the time.  I learned that a lot of our issues politically come from a lack of understanding of other perspectives and also the fact that so often young conservatives and young liberals will go into debate, like I said earlier, trying to beat the other one as oppose to come to an agreement[.] ... I'm working on some efforts to encourage bipartisanship or at least discussion that is productive and help a lot of people avoid the mistakes that I made.

His reasons for leaving March for Our Lives:

On his current relationship with March for Our Lives: I left the March.  I'm off the board.  I left the organization and if I thought that my friends and the people I worked with couldn't do it without me I would not have done that, but alas all of our efforts looking forward looked like they didn't really need my involvement and while I could have helped it wasn't crucial.  You know what I thought in some of the platforms that I have for only the worst reasons is something I really believe in, because I'm a Spider man fan, and I can tell you with great platform comes great responsibility.  I thought it was my responsibility to take all the things I was kicking myself for and to encourage others to avoid it.

Kasky is a rarity: a young person with an open mind.  Of course, he had to leave the narrow ideological confines of his school experience to have that mind opened, but it's refreshing to see nonetheless.

He's also a young man with a conscience.  He sees the mindlessness of what David Hogg and others in the movement are doing and wants to change that. 

You can hear the interview here.

Cameron Kasky, co-founder of the anti-gun youth group March for Our Lives, made an appearance on Fox radio and was interviewed by Guy Benson and Marie Harf.  Kasky had some shocking things to say about his experience with the group and why he left it.

Kasky confronted Marco Rubio at a town hall, saying some pretty harsh things to the senator.  He has since re-examined his actions and what he believed at that time.

But, looking back on that it's like you said, you touched off on this very well in the intro, I'm not going to kick myself for it because I'm 17.  Despite the fact that I thought I did at the time, I don't know everything.  But, I look back on that and I say, you know what, there were people who had just been buried and when you're looking at somebody that you find might in some way have been complicit in this murderer obtaining the weapon it's hard not to say something like that.  But, I went into that wanting less conversation and more to embarrass Rubio and that was my biggest flaw. 

Touring with March for Our Lives opened Kasky's eyes – and mind – to new ideas.

On his plans going forward: This summer when March For Our Lives went on the summer tour that we embarked on I met that person in Texas whose [sic] got that semi-automatic weapon because that's how they like to protect their family.  I met the 50 some odd percent of woman [sic] who are pro-life, even though I thought it was preposterous that a woman could be pro-life and not pro-choice at the time.  I learned that a lot of our issues politically come from a lack of understanding of other perspectives and also the fact that so often young conservatives and young liberals will go into debate, like I said earlier, trying to beat the other one as oppose to come to an agreement[.] ... I'm working on some efforts to encourage bipartisanship or at least discussion that is productive and help a lot of people avoid the mistakes that I made.

His reasons for leaving March for Our Lives:

On his current relationship with March for Our Lives: I left the March.  I'm off the board.  I left the organization and if I thought that my friends and the people I worked with couldn't do it without me I would not have done that, but alas all of our efforts looking forward looked like they didn't really need my involvement and while I could have helped it wasn't crucial.  You know what I thought in some of the platforms that I have for only the worst reasons is something I really believe in, because I'm a Spider man fan, and I can tell you with great platform comes great responsibility.  I thought it was my responsibility to take all the things I was kicking myself for and to encourage others to avoid it.

Kasky is a rarity: a young person with an open mind.  Of course, he had to leave the narrow ideological confines of his school experience to have that mind opened, but it's refreshing to see nonetheless.

He's also a young man with a conscience.  He sees the mindlessness of what David Hogg and others in the movement are doing and wants to change that. 

You can hear the interview here.