'Anti-violence' protesters plan to shut down O'Hare airport

Protesters billing themselves as "anti-violence" will march along the Kennedy Expressway in Chicago to O'Hare airport where they say they plan to shut the facility down.

Chicago police have offered the protesters alternatives, but it looks like some kind of confrontation is inevitable.

USA Today:

Any disruption could cause major headaches for travelers headed home from holiday weekends. Major David Byrd, spokesman for the Illinois State Police, said authorities will not allow the protest to interrupt traffic.

Byrd said authorities had offered protesters alternative venues for the march, adding that he hoped no arrests would need to be made. But he provided no details on how marchers would be stopped.

"We are prepared for all contingencies," he said.

Livingston has a list of demands ranging from Mayor Rahm Emanuel's resignation to repurposing closed schools for businesses and other uses that stabilize neighborhoods.

He also wants economic investment on the South and West sides "commensurate" with spending on the North Side and downtown, legislation to encourage hiring of released inmates and resources for black-led anti-violence efforts.

"I’d would rather see my people marching on the expressways than dying in the streets," Livingston tweeted Sunday.

You can "repurpose" a school all you want but what business in their right mind would move to a shooting gallery? The "demands" of protesters for investment and jobs all hinge on the streets being relatively safe and given the problems with police in recent years, that isn't likely to happen anytime soon.

In the past few months, protesters have shut down busy Lake Shore Drive, and the Dan Ryan Expressway. Rather than arrest the lot of them, the police have tried to reroute traffic or create a single lane for cars to get by.

These efforts met with limited success and the cops ended up simply shutting down the highways.

But O'Hare is a very sensitive transportation hub for the city and it is doubtful protesters will get all the way there. And while the protesters have remained peaceful, if push comes to shove - and the Chicago police are not known for their gentleness toward protesters - there may be a violent confrontation.

Protesters billing themselves as "anti-violence" will march along the Kennedy Expressway in Chicago to O'Hare airport where they say they plan to shut the facility down.

Chicago police have offered the protesters alternatives, but it looks like some kind of confrontation is inevitable.

USA Today:

Any disruption could cause major headaches for travelers headed home from holiday weekends. Major David Byrd, spokesman for the Illinois State Police, said authorities will not allow the protest to interrupt traffic.

Byrd said authorities had offered protesters alternative venues for the march, adding that he hoped no arrests would need to be made. But he provided no details on how marchers would be stopped.

"We are prepared for all contingencies," he said.

Livingston has a list of demands ranging from Mayor Rahm Emanuel's resignation to repurposing closed schools for businesses and other uses that stabilize neighborhoods.

He also wants economic investment on the South and West sides "commensurate" with spending on the North Side and downtown, legislation to encourage hiring of released inmates and resources for black-led anti-violence efforts.

"I’d would rather see my people marching on the expressways than dying in the streets," Livingston tweeted Sunday.

You can "repurpose" a school all you want but what business in their right mind would move to a shooting gallery? The "demands" of protesters for investment and jobs all hinge on the streets being relatively safe and given the problems with police in recent years, that isn't likely to happen anytime soon.

In the past few months, protesters have shut down busy Lake Shore Drive, and the Dan Ryan Expressway. Rather than arrest the lot of them, the police have tried to reroute traffic or create a single lane for cars to get by.

These efforts met with limited success and the cops ended up simply shutting down the highways.

But O'Hare is a very sensitive transportation hub for the city and it is doubtful protesters will get all the way there. And while the protesters have remained peaceful, if push comes to shove - and the Chicago police are not known for their gentleness toward protesters - there may be a violent confrontation.