Wikipedia caves, permits a tiny mention of Sarah Jeong's famous tweets

Leftists really don't want you to know what Sarah Jeong tweeted out on Twitter over a three-year stretch from 2013 to 2015 – the stuff about canceling white people, being cruel to old white men for the joy of it, planning for the extinction of the white race, shooting cops, hating men, despising the New York Times editorial staff, the things she really thought before she decided to get "respectable" and move on as an editorial writer at the New York Times.  All those things she has since said white people made her do.  The things that would turn no heads at the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender, which she once edited.

So they did what they do best, in the old Stalin-erases-purged-members-of-the-Politburo-from-pictures tradition, erasing news or discussion of all those world-famous tweets from Jeong's Wikipedia page, forbidding them from even being repeated, despite the indisputable factuality of their existence.  Daily Caller has a report:

New York Times editorial board member Sarah Jeong's Wikipedia page includes no mention of her racist tweets that resurfaced after her new position with the newspaper was announced, apparently because activist editors for the free online encyclopedia won't allow any mention of her tweets.

There has been a lot of debate amongst Wikipedia writers and editors about whether or not mention of her racist tweets should be included on her page.

One edit request in favor of adding a section about her tweets said:

Sarah Jeong is infamous for her racists tweets on twitter, most of the people who know her name will know her by her tweets. Because of this, I think it is misleading to not say a single line about her racist tweets and simply label her as "an American journalist specializing in law and technology topics".

So in other words, instead of just laying out the facts and trying to report them as neutrally as possible, they decided to turn their site into a public relations sheet for the repackaging of Jeong as just another writer with a fancy résumé.  Never mind that little tweet detail.

Apparently, that's caused some problems, because they've now got a weak-tea mention of the existence of the tweets (the one thing that has made her very, very famous) at the bottom of her Wiki page, putting it one step above a self-input LinkedIn page.

What I can see from her Wikipedia page right now is this in the last paragraph:

In August 2018, Jeong was hired by The New York Times to join its editorial board as lead writer on technology, commencing in September.  The hiring sparked a strongly negative reaction in conservative media and social media, which highlighted derogatory tweets about white people that Jeong had posted mostly in 2013 and 2014.  Critics characterized her tweets as being racist; Jeong said that the posts were "counter-trolling" in reaction to harassment she had experienced, and that she regretted adopting that tactic.  The Times stated that it had reviewed her social media history before hiring her, and that it did not condone the posts.

A cave is a cave, despite this weak, slanted write-up.  Apparently, they wanted to retain their reputation as the place to go to get caught up on multi-dimensional news items.  Perhaps they wanted to maintain their reputation for facts and neutral reporting.  Or perhaps they've realized they've got competition.  Maybe they feared Jeong writing negatively about them from her new perch at the New York Times editorial tech post and wanted to stay out of her spotlight.  Perhaps they didn't want to be mistaken for LinkedIn.

What we know now is that Sarah Jeong has some powerful allies on the internet, even at Wikipedia, and they are out there, just waiting for someone not to notice.

Image credit: Wikipedia, with alterations by Monica ShowalterCC BY-SA 3.0.

Leftists really don't want you to know what Sarah Jeong tweeted out on Twitter over a three-year stretch from 2013 to 2015 – the stuff about canceling white people, being cruel to old white men for the joy of it, planning for the extinction of the white race, shooting cops, hating men, despising the New York Times editorial staff, the things she really thought before she decided to get "respectable" and move on as an editorial writer at the New York Times.  All those things she has since said white people made her do.  The things that would turn no heads at the Harvard Journal of Law & Gender, which she once edited.

So they did what they do best, in the old Stalin-erases-purged-members-of-the-Politburo-from-pictures tradition, erasing news or discussion of all those world-famous tweets from Jeong's Wikipedia page, forbidding them from even being repeated, despite the indisputable factuality of their existence.  Daily Caller has a report:

New York Times editorial board member Sarah Jeong's Wikipedia page includes no mention of her racist tweets that resurfaced after her new position with the newspaper was announced, apparently because activist editors for the free online encyclopedia won't allow any mention of her tweets.

There has been a lot of debate amongst Wikipedia writers and editors about whether or not mention of her racist tweets should be included on her page.

One edit request in favor of adding a section about her tweets said:

Sarah Jeong is infamous for her racists tweets on twitter, most of the people who know her name will know her by her tweets. Because of this, I think it is misleading to not say a single line about her racist tweets and simply label her as "an American journalist specializing in law and technology topics".

So in other words, instead of just laying out the facts and trying to report them as neutrally as possible, they decided to turn their site into a public relations sheet for the repackaging of Jeong as just another writer with a fancy résumé.  Never mind that little tweet detail.

Apparently, that's caused some problems, because they've now got a weak-tea mention of the existence of the tweets (the one thing that has made her very, very famous) at the bottom of her Wiki page, putting it one step above a self-input LinkedIn page.

What I can see from her Wikipedia page right now is this in the last paragraph:

In August 2018, Jeong was hired by The New York Times to join its editorial board as lead writer on technology, commencing in September.  The hiring sparked a strongly negative reaction in conservative media and social media, which highlighted derogatory tweets about white people that Jeong had posted mostly in 2013 and 2014.  Critics characterized her tweets as being racist; Jeong said that the posts were "counter-trolling" in reaction to harassment she had experienced, and that she regretted adopting that tactic.  The Times stated that it had reviewed her social media history before hiring her, and that it did not condone the posts.

A cave is a cave, despite this weak, slanted write-up.  Apparently, they wanted to retain their reputation as the place to go to get caught up on multi-dimensional news items.  Perhaps they wanted to maintain their reputation for facts and neutral reporting.  Or perhaps they've realized they've got competition.  Maybe they feared Jeong writing negatively about them from her new perch at the New York Times editorial tech post and wanted to stay out of her spotlight.  Perhaps they didn't want to be mistaken for LinkedIn.

What we know now is that Sarah Jeong has some powerful allies on the internet, even at Wikipedia, and they are out there, just waiting for someone not to notice.

Image credit: Wikipedia, with alterations by Monica ShowalterCC BY-SA 3.0.