Thanks to Michael Cohen guilty plea, midterms are now a national referendum on impeachment

The Trump-haters' project to unseat a duly elected president of the United States now has a specific (and phony) "high crime and misdemeanor" on which to launch impeachment.  An impeachment vote is all but certain if Democrats succeed in capturing a majority in the House of Representatives.  

As Steve McCann points out, Michael Cohen's guilty plea contained specific language that has acted as chum, driving Trump-haters into an impeachment frenzy:


Michael Cohen (photo credit: Iowapolitics.com via Flickr).

 

Within the language describing the campaign law violations was the following:

... in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for public office.

While Donald Trump was not named, there was little doubt that the reference was to the payments made by Michael Cohen to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougall on Trump's behalf.

Within a matter of minutes, the always vigilant mainstream media began immediately calling Trump a criminal and beating the drums for impeachment.  The justification: if Cohen was guilty of breaking the law so, therefore, was Donald Trump. 

Tip O'Neill, former speaker of the House, famously stated, with specific reference to congressional elections, "All politics is local," meaning that voters normally pay attention to the specific candidates they choose among on their ballot and vote for the person, not the party platform.  As a former constituent of O'Neill, I experienced the way he acted in accord with this dictum.  At the moments he was leading the opposition to President Reagan (while actively working with him to achieve compromise legislation – this a period in which #Resistance would have been regarded as unpatriotic and radical), he took a lot of time to talk with his voters, even me.  He came back to the district a lot and made no secret of the location of his house (on Russell Street in Cambridge) or of the barbershop where he got his hair cut, and he would ask about neighbors he knew when a constituent spoke with him.  I experienced this level of attention from him.

But things have changed.  Just as any possible Democrat speaker likely would be unwilling to work with President Trump on compromise legislation, the era of #Resistance means that the sole important issue facing voters in the midterms is whether or not they want the country to spend 2019 and 2020 mainly on the process of impeaching President Trump in the House and trying to convict him in the Senate.

I say bring it on.  Voters who are not crazed with Trump Derangement Syndrome want to keep the economy growing, wages rising, and America getting better trade deals.  Every Republican candidate for the House needs to demand that his opponent make a specific pledge to voters on impeachment.  Those who waffle can be castigated as leaving the door open to a national trauma that will endanger all of the gains since President Trump took office.

The Trump-haters' project to unseat a duly elected president of the United States now has a specific (and phony) "high crime and misdemeanor" on which to launch impeachment.  An impeachment vote is all but certain if Democrats succeed in capturing a majority in the House of Representatives.  

As Steve McCann points out, Michael Cohen's guilty plea contained specific language that has acted as chum, driving Trump-haters into an impeachment frenzy:


Michael Cohen (photo credit: Iowapolitics.com via Flickr).

 

Within the language describing the campaign law violations was the following:

... in coordination and at the direction of a candidate for public office.

While Donald Trump was not named, there was little doubt that the reference was to the payments made by Michael Cohen to Stormy Daniels and Karen McDougall on Trump's behalf.

Within a matter of minutes, the always vigilant mainstream media began immediately calling Trump a criminal and beating the drums for impeachment.  The justification: if Cohen was guilty of breaking the law so, therefore, was Donald Trump. 

Tip O'Neill, former speaker of the House, famously stated, with specific reference to congressional elections, "All politics is local," meaning that voters normally pay attention to the specific candidates they choose among on their ballot and vote for the person, not the party platform.  As a former constituent of O'Neill, I experienced the way he acted in accord with this dictum.  At the moments he was leading the opposition to President Reagan (while actively working with him to achieve compromise legislation – this a period in which #Resistance would have been regarded as unpatriotic and radical), he took a lot of time to talk with his voters, even me.  He came back to the district a lot and made no secret of the location of his house (on Russell Street in Cambridge) or of the barbershop where he got his hair cut, and he would ask about neighbors he knew when a constituent spoke with him.  I experienced this level of attention from him.

But things have changed.  Just as any possible Democrat speaker likely would be unwilling to work with President Trump on compromise legislation, the era of #Resistance means that the sole important issue facing voters in the midterms is whether or not they want the country to spend 2019 and 2020 mainly on the process of impeaching President Trump in the House and trying to convict him in the Senate.

I say bring it on.  Voters who are not crazed with Trump Derangement Syndrome want to keep the economy growing, wages rising, and America getting better trade deals.  Every Republican candidate for the House needs to demand that his opponent make a specific pledge to voters on impeachment.  Those who waffle can be castigated as leaving the door open to a national trauma that will endanger all of the gains since President Trump took office.