Security clearance was stripped from Pentagon analyst who questioned lavish contracts for Stefan Halper

Where is the media and Democrat outrage over the loss of security clearance for the Pentagon analyst who had the temerity to question the large sums of money being paid to Stefan Halper, the informant who played a key role in apparently setting up George Papadopoulos and Carter Page for use in claiming justification for a FISA warrant to spy on the Trump campaign?  Remember Halper?  He was the guy that the media mostly refused to name.

Clarice Feldman:

Stefan Halper, the dual U.S.-U.K. citizen who reached out to Trump campaign aides George Papadopoulos and Carter Page, is the international man of mystery when it comes to the origins of the FBI counterintelligence probe of the Trump campaign and presidency.  From public records, we know he was receiving hundreds of thousands of dollars a year from the federal government national security apparatus.

From the payment statements, the Department of Defense's Office of Net Assessment appears to have been the contract award-maker.  We still do not know what he was paid for, though there are several instances seeming to indicate that he was trying to engage low-level Trump campaign staff in suspicious actions. ...

On the other hand, the Office of Net Assessment and its head seem to have been generous to Chelsea Clinton's best friend, whose contract was heavily promoted by Hillary Clinton, as the Daily Caller reported last year.

It certainly looks as though Halper is Connected, with a capital C.  He is the son-in-law of CIA legend Ray Cline.  Pity poor Adam Lovinger, the Pentagon analyst who apparently did not realize that it was taboo to shed any light on him.

Rowan Scarborough of the Washington Times reports:

Adam Lovinger, a 12-year strategist in the Pentagon's Office of Net Assessment, complained to his bosses about Halper contracts in the fall of 2016, his attorney, Sean M. Bigley, told The Washington Times.

On May 1, 2017, his superiors yanked his security clearance and relegated him to clerical chores.

Mr. Bigley filed a complaint July 18 with the Pentagon's senior ethics official, charging that Mr. Lovinger's superiors misused the security clearance process to punish him.  He said his client complained about excessive "sweetheart" deals for Mr. Halper and for a "best friend" of Chelsea Clinton.

"As it turns out, one of the two contractors Mr. Lovinger explicitly warned his ONA superiors about misusing in 2016 was none other than Mr. Halper," Mr. Bigley wrote in his ethics complaint, which called the contracts "cronyism and corruption."

Mr. Lovinger filed a whistleblower reprisal complaint in May with the Defense Department inspector general against James Baker, director of the Office of Net Assessment. The complaint also singles out Washington Headquarters Services, a Pentagon support agency that awarded the Halper contracts totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars.

This may be another ticking time bomb for the Deep Staters:

Mr. Bigley told The Times that the inspector general's criminal investigative division has interviewed Mr. Lovinger about Office of Net Assessment contracting.

I don't expect any outrage from Democrats, CNN, MSNBC, The New York Times, or any of the other enablers.

At the moment, Halper's whereabouts are unknown.  That could mean all sorts of things, many of them mutually contradictory.  Halper may be a thread that, when pulled, unravels something big.  Based on the treatment of Lovinger, that appears to be the case.

Where is the media and Democrat outrage over the loss of security clearance for the Pentagon analyst who had the temerity to question the large sums of money being paid to Stefan Halper, the informant who played a key role in apparently setting up George Papadopoulos and Carter Page for use in claiming justification for a FISA warrant to spy on the Trump campaign?  Remember Halper?  He was the guy that the media mostly refused to name.

Clarice Feldman:

Stefan Halper, the dual U.S.-U.K. citizen who reached out to Trump campaign aides George Papadopoulos and Carter Page, is the international man of mystery when it comes to the origins of the FBI counterintelligence probe of the Trump campaign and presidency.  From public records, we know he was receiving hundreds of thousands of dollars a year from the federal government national security apparatus.

From the payment statements, the Department of Defense's Office of Net Assessment appears to have been the contract award-maker.  We still do not know what he was paid for, though there are several instances seeming to indicate that he was trying to engage low-level Trump campaign staff in suspicious actions. ...

On the other hand, the Office of Net Assessment and its head seem to have been generous to Chelsea Clinton's best friend, whose contract was heavily promoted by Hillary Clinton, as the Daily Caller reported last year.

It certainly looks as though Halper is Connected, with a capital C.  He is the son-in-law of CIA legend Ray Cline.  Pity poor Adam Lovinger, the Pentagon analyst who apparently did not realize that it was taboo to shed any light on him.

Rowan Scarborough of the Washington Times reports:

Adam Lovinger, a 12-year strategist in the Pentagon's Office of Net Assessment, complained to his bosses about Halper contracts in the fall of 2016, his attorney, Sean M. Bigley, told The Washington Times.

On May 1, 2017, his superiors yanked his security clearance and relegated him to clerical chores.

Mr. Bigley filed a complaint July 18 with the Pentagon's senior ethics official, charging that Mr. Lovinger's superiors misused the security clearance process to punish him.  He said his client complained about excessive "sweetheart" deals for Mr. Halper and for a "best friend" of Chelsea Clinton.

"As it turns out, one of the two contractors Mr. Lovinger explicitly warned his ONA superiors about misusing in 2016 was none other than Mr. Halper," Mr. Bigley wrote in his ethics complaint, which called the contracts "cronyism and corruption."

Mr. Lovinger filed a whistleblower reprisal complaint in May with the Defense Department inspector general against James Baker, director of the Office of Net Assessment. The complaint also singles out Washington Headquarters Services, a Pentagon support agency that awarded the Halper contracts totaling hundreds of thousands of dollars.

This may be another ticking time bomb for the Deep Staters:

Mr. Bigley told The Times that the inspector general's criminal investigative division has interviewed Mr. Lovinger about Office of Net Assessment contracting.

I don't expect any outrage from Democrats, CNN, MSNBC, The New York Times, or any of the other enablers.

At the moment, Halper's whereabouts are unknown.  That could mean all sorts of things, many of them mutually contradictory.  Halper may be a thread that, when pulled, unravels something big.  Based on the treatment of Lovinger, that appears to be the case.