Democrat love-in for John McCain another symptom of Trump Derangement Syndrome

This will probably get me in trouble, but the overblown tributes to John McCain are getting tiresome.  Some of the praise is being used as cover to hit President Trump, who has accomplished far more in a year and a half in public office than McCain did in thirty-six.  It is amusing how Democrats and their corrupt media allies (who despised McCain when he dared get in the way of their beloved Obama's ascension), are now elevating him to divine status.

Look: McCain was a military hero, but not a political one.  I honor his military service.

He also had serious character issues.  After cheating for years on his first wife (she was in a car accident that left her disfigured), McCain decided to divorce her and marry his 24-year-old mistress, who just happened to be a wealthy beer heiress who could help him launch his political career.  Soon thereafter, he was involved in the Keating 5 financial scandal, where he improperly intervened on behalf of a wealthy donor who was the target of a regulatory investigation.

McCain's 2008 campaign was a disaster.  He refused to hit Obama where he was most vulnerable: his association with terrorists like Bill Ayers, fraudsters like Tony Rezko (from whom Obama purchased his home in a shady deal), and racists like Jeremiah Wright.  He also paused his campaign during the financial crises and had a deer-in-the-headlights look about him whenever he was asked about economic policy.  Further, as much as I like many things about Sarah Palin, she was not ready for prime time – he failed to properly vet her.

I also have a big issue with him killing the repeal of the Unaffordable Care Act (likely out of spite to President Trump) and not stepping down from the Senate when he could no longer perform his duties.

I admire John McCain's service to his country, in Vietnam and later in politics, but hero-worshiping him for purposes of hitting President Trump is just wrong.

Image: Gage Skidmore via Flickr.

This will probably get me in trouble, but the overblown tributes to John McCain are getting tiresome.  Some of the praise is being used as cover to hit President Trump, who has accomplished far more in a year and a half in public office than McCain did in thirty-six.  It is amusing how Democrats and their corrupt media allies (who despised McCain when he dared get in the way of their beloved Obama's ascension), are now elevating him to divine status.

Look: McCain was a military hero, but not a political one.  I honor his military service.

He also had serious character issues.  After cheating for years on his first wife (she was in a car accident that left her disfigured), McCain decided to divorce her and marry his 24-year-old mistress, who just happened to be a wealthy beer heiress who could help him launch his political career.  Soon thereafter, he was involved in the Keating 5 financial scandal, where he improperly intervened on behalf of a wealthy donor who was the target of a regulatory investigation.

McCain's 2008 campaign was a disaster.  He refused to hit Obama where he was most vulnerable: his association with terrorists like Bill Ayers, fraudsters like Tony Rezko (from whom Obama purchased his home in a shady deal), and racists like Jeremiah Wright.  He also paused his campaign during the financial crises and had a deer-in-the-headlights look about him whenever he was asked about economic policy.  Further, as much as I like many things about Sarah Palin, she was not ready for prime time – he failed to properly vet her.

I also have a big issue with him killing the repeal of the Unaffordable Care Act (likely out of spite to President Trump) and not stepping down from the Senate when he could no longer perform his duties.

I admire John McCain's service to his country, in Vietnam and later in politics, but hero-worshiping him for purposes of hitting President Trump is just wrong.

Image: Gage Skidmore via Flickr.