Dem IT aide Awan will get no jail time

Imran Awan, the former I.T. aide to Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and many other Democratic congressmen, will not serve time in jail for federal bank fraud charges.

The prosecutors in their sentencing memo didn't recommend prison for the Pakistani national who some believe hacked the personal computer emails of the congressmen he served.

Fox News:

During a hearing Tuesday in Washington, U.S. District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan sentenced Awan to three months of supervised release plus time served.  Chutkan, who cited "unfounded allegations" against Awan, also did not impose a fine.

Awan, who pleaded guilty in July to making a false statement on a loan application, delivered an emotional statement vowing: "I promise you this second chance will not go to waste."

The prosecution, in a recent sentencing memorandum, did not advocate jail time for Awan.

Federal guidelines recommended a sentence of zero to six months in jail, followed by two to five years of supervised release.  Prosecutors said they did not oppose a noncustodial sentence.

The case had generated great interest from conservatives, who suggested Awan could have been involved in a cyber breach operation.  Awan, who was arrested last summer at Dulles International Airport before trying to board a flight to Pakistan, worked as a technology employee to top Democrats, including Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

But prosecutors said during July's plea hearing that they investigated allegations of misconduct by Awan while on the job in Congress and said they "uncovered no evidence" that Awan "violated federal law with respect to the House computer systems."

Awan admitted in July's plea deal to working to obtain home equity lines of credit from the Congressional Federal Credit Union in December 2016 by giving false information about a property.  As part of the deal, the prosecution dropped fraud charges against Awan's wife, Hina Alvi.

Awan skated because of a lack of cooperation from Wasserman Schultz with the investigation into hacking by Awan and his family.  Of course the prosecution found "no evidence" that Awan hacked House computer systems.  Awan was careful to smash hard drives found in his home by the FBI.  And Wasserman Schultz was very helpful to Awan in constantly looking to limit or shut down the hacking probe.

There is no doubt that Awan is a crook and a fraudster.  But might he have been a spy for Pakistani intelligence?  We'll never know, because it was to everyone's advantage to bury this embarrassing case.

Imran Awan, the former I.T. aide to Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz and many other Democratic congressmen, will not serve time in jail for federal bank fraud charges.

The prosecutors in their sentencing memo didn't recommend prison for the Pakistani national who some believe hacked the personal computer emails of the congressmen he served.

Fox News:

During a hearing Tuesday in Washington, U.S. District Judge Tanya S. Chutkan sentenced Awan to three months of supervised release plus time served.  Chutkan, who cited "unfounded allegations" against Awan, also did not impose a fine.

Awan, who pleaded guilty in July to making a false statement on a loan application, delivered an emotional statement vowing: "I promise you this second chance will not go to waste."

The prosecution, in a recent sentencing memorandum, did not advocate jail time for Awan.

Federal guidelines recommended a sentence of zero to six months in jail, followed by two to five years of supervised release.  Prosecutors said they did not oppose a noncustodial sentence.

The case had generated great interest from conservatives, who suggested Awan could have been involved in a cyber breach operation.  Awan, who was arrested last summer at Dulles International Airport before trying to board a flight to Pakistan, worked as a technology employee to top Democrats, including Florida Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz.

But prosecutors said during July's plea hearing that they investigated allegations of misconduct by Awan while on the job in Congress and said they "uncovered no evidence" that Awan "violated federal law with respect to the House computer systems."

Awan admitted in July's plea deal to working to obtain home equity lines of credit from the Congressional Federal Credit Union in December 2016 by giving false information about a property.  As part of the deal, the prosecution dropped fraud charges against Awan's wife, Hina Alvi.

Awan skated because of a lack of cooperation from Wasserman Schultz with the investigation into hacking by Awan and his family.  Of course the prosecution found "no evidence" that Awan hacked House computer systems.  Awan was careful to smash hard drives found in his home by the FBI.  And Wasserman Schultz was very helpful to Awan in constantly looking to limit or shut down the hacking probe.

There is no doubt that Awan is a crook and a fraudster.  But might he have been a spy for Pakistani intelligence?  We'll never know, because it was to everyone's advantage to bury this embarrassing case.