Add condoms to the shortages in Cuba

In the early 1990s, I heard Professor Juan Clark say there were more abortions than births in Cuba.  I couldn't believe it, but it's true.

This week, Cuban blogger Yoanni Sanchez provided an update on the situation in Cuba, and especially the shortage of condoms:

Despite decades of declining funding for the health system, broad access to medical care and the legalization of abortion have been vital in providing assistance to many Cuban women.

Many Cubans rely on abortion as a form of birth control.  The health risks of repeated abortions include cervical complications and even infertility.

According to official records, in 2016 there were 85,445 abortions performed in Cuban hospitals, or about 41.9 terminations per 100 pregnancies.

"Qué barbarida" – the Cuban expression of total shock.

It's not surprising that there are shortages of condoms.  In fact, there are shortages of everything unless you can go to special tourist stores where you have to pay in dollars, euros, or a foreign-currency credit card.  Sadly, most Cubans are not allowed to go in those stores.

The massive use of abortion is further evidence of the regime's moral corruption.  They see babies as mouths to feed, or more trouble for a regime that never has enough supply of anything.

The other problem is the aging of the Cuban population:

A depressed birth rate means two things: The population grows at a reduced pace, and the overall population is older.

Cuba is already seeing its population growth start to plateau.  Plus, a large percentage of the population falls into the 40-to-60 age bracket, which means that in a few years the younger generation will need to support a large number of retirees.

In fact, by 2021 more people in Cuba are expected to leave the work force than to join it; by 2026 more Cubans will die than be born; and by 2050 the number of people in Cuba over age 60 will reach 3.5 million, or 36% of the population, according to figures cited by the British ambassador to Cuba, Tim Cole.

What a legacy of communism in Cuba – an aging population, young women with four abortions, and tourists with dollars who can buy condoms while the locals with pesos can't.  What a horrific revolution, is all I can say.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.

In the early 1990s, I heard Professor Juan Clark say there were more abortions than births in Cuba.  I couldn't believe it, but it's true.

This week, Cuban blogger Yoanni Sanchez provided an update on the situation in Cuba, and especially the shortage of condoms:

Despite decades of declining funding for the health system, broad access to medical care and the legalization of abortion have been vital in providing assistance to many Cuban women.

Many Cubans rely on abortion as a form of birth control.  The health risks of repeated abortions include cervical complications and even infertility.

According to official records, in 2016 there were 85,445 abortions performed in Cuban hospitals, or about 41.9 terminations per 100 pregnancies.

"Qué barbarida" – the Cuban expression of total shock.

It's not surprising that there are shortages of condoms.  In fact, there are shortages of everything unless you can go to special tourist stores where you have to pay in dollars, euros, or a foreign-currency credit card.  Sadly, most Cubans are not allowed to go in those stores.

The massive use of abortion is further evidence of the regime's moral corruption.  They see babies as mouths to feed, or more trouble for a regime that never has enough supply of anything.

The other problem is the aging of the Cuban population:

A depressed birth rate means two things: The population grows at a reduced pace, and the overall population is older.

Cuba is already seeing its population growth start to plateau.  Plus, a large percentage of the population falls into the 40-to-60 age bracket, which means that in a few years the younger generation will need to support a large number of retirees.

In fact, by 2021 more people in Cuba are expected to leave the work force than to join it; by 2026 more Cubans will die than be born; and by 2050 the number of people in Cuba over age 60 will reach 3.5 million, or 36% of the population, according to figures cited by the British ambassador to Cuba, Tim Cole.

What a legacy of communism in Cuba – an aging population, young women with four abortions, and tourists with dollars who can buy condoms while the locals with pesos can't.  What a horrific revolution, is all I can say.

PS: You can listen to my show (Canto Talk) and follow me on Twitter.