Manchin to Schumer on SCOTUS vote: 'Kiss my you know what'

Despite blood curdling threats from Democrats that they'll "go to the mattresses" to keep Brett Kavanaugh from taking a seat on the Supreme Court, the truth is that they are far from united on the issue of opposing Trump's pick. In fact, it appears that, at least, two or three Democratic senators representing states won by Trump in the 2016 election, may bolt their party and vote for Kavanaugh anyway.

The Hill:

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin (W.Va.) had strong words for Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer’s (D-N.Y.) efforts to unify the party against President Trump’s Supreme Court pick.

Manchin suggested to Politico that Schumer does not have any influence over whether or not he supports Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“I’ll be 71 years old in August, you’re going to whip me? Kiss my you know what,” Manchin told Politico, referring to whipping votes among the party caucus.

Schumer has spoken out harshly against Kavanaugh and vowed to oppose him “with everything I’ve got.” Democrats will need at least two GOP votes, in addition to all Democrats, to block the nomination.

But Democrats up for reelection in Trump states are not guaranteed votes against the confirmation, and many have signaled that Schumer’s efforts may not be enough to convince them to vote against the nominee.

“My decision won’t have anything to do with Chuck Schumer,” Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) told Politico. Donnelly, in addition to Manchin and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) all voted in support of Neil Gorsuch.

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) told Politico that Schumer “knows better” than to try to pressure her to vote a certain way.

Add to that list Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota. All four Democratic senators are in very tough re-election fights and the wrong vote on Trump's SCOTUS nominee could mean the difference between victory and defeat.

The Republicans have been universal in their praise for Kavanaugh - even RINOs Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski. If all 51 Republicans vote "yes," Democrats can scream about a return to slavery or the end of women's rights, or the death of gay people all they want. It will do them no good.

And it's likely that if the GOP is united on the issue, those four Democrats plus perhaps one or two others would vote for Kavanaugh as well.

 

Despite blood curdling threats from Democrats that they'll "go to the mattresses" to keep Brett Kavanaugh from taking a seat on the Supreme Court, the truth is that they are far from united on the issue of opposing Trump's pick. In fact, it appears that, at least, two or three Democratic senators representing states won by Trump in the 2016 election, may bolt their party and vote for Kavanaugh anyway.

The Hill:

Democratic Sen. Joe Manchin (W.Va.) had strong words for Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer’s (D-N.Y.) efforts to unify the party against President Trump’s Supreme Court pick.

Manchin suggested to Politico that Schumer does not have any influence over whether or not he supports Brett Kavanaugh’s nomination.

“I’ll be 71 years old in August, you’re going to whip me? Kiss my you know what,” Manchin told Politico, referring to whipping votes among the party caucus.

Schumer has spoken out harshly against Kavanaugh and vowed to oppose him “with everything I’ve got.” Democrats will need at least two GOP votes, in addition to all Democrats, to block the nomination.

But Democrats up for reelection in Trump states are not guaranteed votes against the confirmation, and many have signaled that Schumer’s efforts may not be enough to convince them to vote against the nominee.

“My decision won’t have anything to do with Chuck Schumer,” Sen. Joe Donnelly (D-Ind.) told Politico. Donnelly, in addition to Manchin and Sen. Heidi Heitkamp (D-N.D.) all voted in support of Neil Gorsuch.

Sen. Claire McCaskill (D-Mo.) told Politico that Schumer “knows better” than to try to pressure her to vote a certain way.

Add to that list Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota. All four Democratic senators are in very tough re-election fights and the wrong vote on Trump's SCOTUS nominee could mean the difference between victory and defeat.

The Republicans have been universal in their praise for Kavanaugh - even RINOs Susan Collins and Lisa Murkowski. If all 51 Republicans vote "yes," Democrats can scream about a return to slavery or the end of women's rights, or the death of gay people all they want. It will do them no good.

And it's likely that if the GOP is united on the issue, those four Democrats plus perhaps one or two others would vote for Kavanaugh as well.