Does the Republican Party have the guts necessary to win the midterms?

In an election, as in a trial, the outcome depends less on a weighing up of all the issues and more on which issues the electorate focuses on.  Succeed in getting the electorate to focus on the most positive achievement of one's own party, and on the most loathsome feature of the opposition, and coast to victory.  Not necessarily in that order, and not necessarily of equal value.

As to President Trump's greatest accomplishment, the economy, economic growth, and the jobs figures lead the pack by a mile.

As to the loathsomeness of the Dems, their increasingly unhinged stands on immigration are equally clearly in first place.

Trump won the nomination and the presidency on the voters' belief that this guy, at last, was someone who meant what he said on immigration.  He, and the Republican Party, can hold the House and the Senate if they focus the electorate's attention on the Dems' immigration lunacy, and then, secondarily, on the president's amazing economic results.

On immigration, the Dems' agenda has become a smorgasbord of electoral emetics that only needs to be served up to American voters to produce a collective gag that will be heard round the country.

I think back to Lee Atwater in 1988, who single-handedly turned the Bush campaign around with a masterful TV ad.  Magnificent political advocacy, which drew attention away from Bush's deficiencies and redirected it to the odiousness of the Dems.

The same brass knuckles approach Atwater used beckons again, on the Dems' suicidal positions of abolishing ICE; open borders for criminals, terrorists, and drug-dealers; and sanctuary cities.  All positions despised by 75% of the electorate. 

America's now hard left party is locked into these positions, and they're not just the Dems' "fringe."  See the California Dems' executive committee's endorsement of the lunatic Kevin de León over incumbent Dianne Feinstein.  See New York senator Gillibrand's mandatory metamorphosis from moderate to open borders whacko.

This is who the Democratic Party is.  The case must be made that a vote for any so-called "moderate Dem" is a vote for the party's destructive national agenda on immigration – an agenda despised by large majorities.

Atwater-like ads on all this stuff could open huge wounds on the electoral support for the Ds' "blue wave" dreams across the country.  

Montages of tattooed MS-13 members, hordes of shrieking demonstrators waving "Abolish ICE" and "No Borders" placards come to mind.  Superimposed on the determined face of the president who's been struggling to stop it all, stirring music in the background.  The Dems' compulsive wrist-slitting on immigration presents limitless theatrical and communicative possibilities.

Not to forget the gift that gives and gives, leftist harridan-in-chief and all-around advocate of violence, Maxine Waters.  But Waters is only the seasoning.  The Dems' irresistible impulse to suicide on immigration is the main course.

Is the Republican Party working on this rich and diverse material now?  If not, why not?

But: I'm haunted by, among other things, McCain's statement early in the 2008 race that Obama's associations (Jeremiah Wright, Bill Ayers, and the rest) would be off limits.  I knew then that he would lose big.  And that he didn't deserve to win.

Will Bushie-McCain niceness prevail again, or this time, does the Republican Party want to win?

Will the Republican Party imprint the Dems' immigration madness on the forehead of every Democratic congressional and senatorial candidate?  Have they learned anything from the president's 2016 triumph?

It's hard to see how a mixture of the amazing list of President Trump's economic accomplishments, achieved under the constant fire of hysterical abuse, together with unceasing blunt reminders of the Dems' suicidal immigration policies, could fail.

As ever with Republicans, whether this campaign approach unfolds is a question of insight, desire, and guts.  I'm not sure the Republican Party has any of these, let alone all three.

Image by Fibonacci Blue, via Wikimedia Commons.

In an election, as in a trial, the outcome depends less on a weighing up of all the issues and more on which issues the electorate focuses on.  Succeed in getting the electorate to focus on the most positive achievement of one's own party, and on the most loathsome feature of the opposition, and coast to victory.  Not necessarily in that order, and not necessarily of equal value.

As to President Trump's greatest accomplishment, the economy, economic growth, and the jobs figures lead the pack by a mile.

As to the loathsomeness of the Dems, their increasingly unhinged stands on immigration are equally clearly in first place.

Trump won the nomination and the presidency on the voters' belief that this guy, at last, was someone who meant what he said on immigration.  He, and the Republican Party, can hold the House and the Senate if they focus the electorate's attention on the Dems' immigration lunacy, and then, secondarily, on the president's amazing economic results.

On immigration, the Dems' agenda has become a smorgasbord of electoral emetics that only needs to be served up to American voters to produce a collective gag that will be heard round the country.

I think back to Lee Atwater in 1988, who single-handedly turned the Bush campaign around with a masterful TV ad.  Magnificent political advocacy, which drew attention away from Bush's deficiencies and redirected it to the odiousness of the Dems.

The same brass knuckles approach Atwater used beckons again, on the Dems' suicidal positions of abolishing ICE; open borders for criminals, terrorists, and drug-dealers; and sanctuary cities.  All positions despised by 75% of the electorate. 

America's now hard left party is locked into these positions, and they're not just the Dems' "fringe."  See the California Dems' executive committee's endorsement of the lunatic Kevin de León over incumbent Dianne Feinstein.  See New York senator Gillibrand's mandatory metamorphosis from moderate to open borders whacko.

This is who the Democratic Party is.  The case must be made that a vote for any so-called "moderate Dem" is a vote for the party's destructive national agenda on immigration – an agenda despised by large majorities.

Atwater-like ads on all this stuff could open huge wounds on the electoral support for the Ds' "blue wave" dreams across the country.  

Montages of tattooed MS-13 members, hordes of shrieking demonstrators waving "Abolish ICE" and "No Borders" placards come to mind.  Superimposed on the determined face of the president who's been struggling to stop it all, stirring music in the background.  The Dems' compulsive wrist-slitting on immigration presents limitless theatrical and communicative possibilities.

Not to forget the gift that gives and gives, leftist harridan-in-chief and all-around advocate of violence, Maxine Waters.  But Waters is only the seasoning.  The Dems' irresistible impulse to suicide on immigration is the main course.

Is the Republican Party working on this rich and diverse material now?  If not, why not?

But: I'm haunted by, among other things, McCain's statement early in the 2008 race that Obama's associations (Jeremiah Wright, Bill Ayers, and the rest) would be off limits.  I knew then that he would lose big.  And that he didn't deserve to win.

Will Bushie-McCain niceness prevail again, or this time, does the Republican Party want to win?

Will the Republican Party imprint the Dems' immigration madness on the forehead of every Democratic congressional and senatorial candidate?  Have they learned anything from the president's 2016 triumph?

It's hard to see how a mixture of the amazing list of President Trump's economic accomplishments, achieved under the constant fire of hysterical abuse, together with unceasing blunt reminders of the Dems' suicidal immigration policies, could fail.

As ever with Republicans, whether this campaign approach unfolds is a question of insight, desire, and guts.  I'm not sure the Republican Party has any of these, let alone all three.

Image by Fibonacci Blue, via Wikimedia Commons.