Can loudmouth illegals champ Vicente Fox answer a few questions about wrecking a Mexican water supply?

Former president Vicente Fox has got to be the most obnoxious guy in Mexico.

Loudly championing illegal aliens in the USA and hurling insults and abuse (including the F-word) at President Trump and his voters, he's positioned himself as Mister Virtue-Signaler on globalism, trade, and immigration and lots of other politically correct stuff.

Now maybe he can answer some questions.

The New York Times has come out with a long piece about how Coca-Cola FEMSA, a company he ran, set up a bottling plant that drained the water supply in Chiapas, Mexico.  Chiapas is a major shipper of illegal immigrants to the U.S.  The bottling plant left San Cristóbal de las Casas without adequate water.  Instead of electing officials committed to fixing that, the locals drank the Coke instead of the water, leading to a rash of diabetes cases.  Probably a human thing, but it wasn't good for them, and it's sad they didn't have the social capital to fix it.

The Times writes:

Potable water is increasingly scarce in San Cristóbal de las Casas, a picturesque mountain town in the southeastern state of Chiapas where some neighborhoods have running water just a few times a week, and many households are forced to buy extra water from tanker trucks.

So, many residents drink Coca-Cola, which is produced by a local bottling plant, can be easier to find than bottled water and is almost as cheap.

In a country that is among the world's top consumers of sugary drinks, Chiapas is a champion: Residents of San Cristóbal and the lush highlands that envelop the city drink on average more than two liters, or more than half a gallon, of soda a day.

The effect on public health has been devastating.  The mortality rate from diabetes in Chiapas increased 30 percent between 2013 and 2016, and the disease is now the second-leading cause of death in the state after heart disease, claiming more than 3,000 lives every year.

It kind of reads like an activist piece where only one side of things is really reported, and it's a somewhat suspicious premise, given that the Times reported that the diabetes mortality rate shot up 30% only from 2013 to 2016 (did it use those three years to spike up a less bad broader trend?), but it's possibly a reflection of the cumulative effect of residents drinking Coca-Cola instead of bottled water.  I remain suspicious of the suddenness of the number, if it were entirely the result of Coca Cola, because if it were, it seems likely that the upward slope would have gone more gradually as the most diabetes-prone succumbed first.  The other thing is, they've been drinking Coca Cola for a long, long while.  Why didn't more die earlier?  The Times doesn't say.

That said, the Times makes a pretty good case that it was a sweetheart crony capitalist deal with a powerful billionaire-led group over the other local entrepreneurs that depleted the water supply, meaning it wasn't all that free-market a transaction – just more mismanagement of resources by cronied up governments, which ought to be on the spot for it and somehow aren't.  The article says they're big polluters, too, which remains unchecked.  Worse still, the Coca-Cola plant didn't seem to be contributing anything other than 400 jobs to the community.  The taxes all went to Mexico City.  And it seems nobody is doing much to fix the situation, other than some public relations stuff.  Meanwhile, the locals use Coca-Cola in their indigenous religious ceremonies and feed it to their babies, which doesn't sound as though they have a good idea about what their interests are. 

So who was running FEMSA as its chief executive around the time that plant would have gone up?  Well, Vicente Fox.

The guy who advocates shipping illegals to the U.S. and screams racism at Americans who don't like it is the same guy who wrecked the Chiapas water supply to turn a profit.  The Mexican locals got diabetes from it, they come up here illegally for treatment, and all is hunky-dory from the Vicente Fox point of view.

The story highlights something that really needs to be brought up in the illegal immigration debate: the lousy failures of the governments that ship illegals, something they are rarely ever on the spot for, not the way ordinary Americans are.  Why isn't Fox answering some questions about this, given his record of illegal alien advocacy and wealthy lifestyle?

Someone needs to put him on the spot for doing such deeds through his business career.  We all know he was a bad president, but apparently, the wreckage started early.  No wonder millions of Mexicans fled the country to El Norte.  Now he's jumped on the pot sales bandwagon, apparently to promote marijuana use and legalization, something else he's been a loudmouth on.

Can someone ask him about that?  This guy has a record of foisting toxic things on Mexicans and expecting us to pick up the bill.  How about a few questions for this hypocrite with such an awful record of harmful products – whether pot; Coke; or, worst of all, Mexican government?

Image credit: Gage Skidmore via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0.

Former president Vicente Fox has got to be the most obnoxious guy in Mexico.

Loudly championing illegal aliens in the USA and hurling insults and abuse (including the F-word) at President Trump and his voters, he's positioned himself as Mister Virtue-Signaler on globalism, trade, and immigration and lots of other politically correct stuff.

Now maybe he can answer some questions.

The New York Times has come out with a long piece about how Coca-Cola FEMSA, a company he ran, set up a bottling plant that drained the water supply in Chiapas, Mexico.  Chiapas is a major shipper of illegal immigrants to the U.S.  The bottling plant left San Cristóbal de las Casas without adequate water.  Instead of electing officials committed to fixing that, the locals drank the Coke instead of the water, leading to a rash of diabetes cases.  Probably a human thing, but it wasn't good for them, and it's sad they didn't have the social capital to fix it.

The Times writes:

Potable water is increasingly scarce in San Cristóbal de las Casas, a picturesque mountain town in the southeastern state of Chiapas where some neighborhoods have running water just a few times a week, and many households are forced to buy extra water from tanker trucks.

So, many residents drink Coca-Cola, which is produced by a local bottling plant, can be easier to find than bottled water and is almost as cheap.

In a country that is among the world's top consumers of sugary drinks, Chiapas is a champion: Residents of San Cristóbal and the lush highlands that envelop the city drink on average more than two liters, or more than half a gallon, of soda a day.

The effect on public health has been devastating.  The mortality rate from diabetes in Chiapas increased 30 percent between 2013 and 2016, and the disease is now the second-leading cause of death in the state after heart disease, claiming more than 3,000 lives every year.

It kind of reads like an activist piece where only one side of things is really reported, and it's a somewhat suspicious premise, given that the Times reported that the diabetes mortality rate shot up 30% only from 2013 to 2016 (did it use those three years to spike up a less bad broader trend?), but it's possibly a reflection of the cumulative effect of residents drinking Coca-Cola instead of bottled water.  I remain suspicious of the suddenness of the number, if it were entirely the result of Coca Cola, because if it were, it seems likely that the upward slope would have gone more gradually as the most diabetes-prone succumbed first.  The other thing is, they've been drinking Coca Cola for a long, long while.  Why didn't more die earlier?  The Times doesn't say.

That said, the Times makes a pretty good case that it was a sweetheart crony capitalist deal with a powerful billionaire-led group over the other local entrepreneurs that depleted the water supply, meaning it wasn't all that free-market a transaction – just more mismanagement of resources by cronied up governments, which ought to be on the spot for it and somehow aren't.  The article says they're big polluters, too, which remains unchecked.  Worse still, the Coca-Cola plant didn't seem to be contributing anything other than 400 jobs to the community.  The taxes all went to Mexico City.  And it seems nobody is doing much to fix the situation, other than some public relations stuff.  Meanwhile, the locals use Coca-Cola in their indigenous religious ceremonies and feed it to their babies, which doesn't sound as though they have a good idea about what their interests are. 

So who was running FEMSA as its chief executive around the time that plant would have gone up?  Well, Vicente Fox.

The guy who advocates shipping illegals to the U.S. and screams racism at Americans who don't like it is the same guy who wrecked the Chiapas water supply to turn a profit.  The Mexican locals got diabetes from it, they come up here illegally for treatment, and all is hunky-dory from the Vicente Fox point of view.

The story highlights something that really needs to be brought up in the illegal immigration debate: the lousy failures of the governments that ship illegals, something they are rarely ever on the spot for, not the way ordinary Americans are.  Why isn't Fox answering some questions about this, given his record of illegal alien advocacy and wealthy lifestyle?

Someone needs to put him on the spot for doing such deeds through his business career.  We all know he was a bad president, but apparently, the wreckage started early.  No wonder millions of Mexicans fled the country to El Norte.  Now he's jumped on the pot sales bandwagon, apparently to promote marijuana use and legalization, something else he's been a loudmouth on.

Can someone ask him about that?  This guy has a record of foisting toxic things on Mexicans and expecting us to pick up the bill.  How about a few questions for this hypocrite with such an awful record of harmful products – whether pot; Coke; or, worst of all, Mexican government?

Image credit: Gage Skidmore via Flickr, CC BY-SA 2.0.